Posts Tagged ‘Psychological Articles’

HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE: Tasting Notes or Testing Notes? The Nose Knows by BoomerYearbook.com

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

With wine-the nose knows

With wine-the nose knows

By Boomeryearbook.com

Strawberries, cherries, leather, coffee, cinnamon, mushrooms…I thought wine was made from grapes. How do all these other aromas and flavors come into this? Such descriptions are known in the wine arena as tasting notes, and although they can be confusing they are designed to provide valuable information about a wine’s characteristics. To an amateur, those who use such terms appear to be speaking to a select group of initiated oenophiles or simply poking fun at you. Perhaps they are trying to impress you with their knowledge of the great complexities of wine or to give you a bit of vertigo.

Although it is daunting to try to perceive all the aromas/flavors depicted in some columnists tasting notes, take heart. Tasting notes really do provide a wealth of information (OK there are those who wax a bit too poetic and describe flavors such as quince, wisteria, and sawgrass …perfumes/flavors not all of us can relate to as easily as, for example, red berries). By and large, these descriptions are not all pompous displays of how many fruits, spices and flowers the reviewer knows. Most notes, whether well written, completely accurate or not, can help you understand how a wine will taste.

How? You say? First, as bizarre as it might seem, it is not just an illusion that many aromas and flavors are present in the wine. Yes, really present.

First let’s clarify the role of smell in tasting. It is indispensable. Humans perceive only four tastes: sweet, salty, bitter, and sour. Humans perceive thousands of smells…detect, identify, differentiate them. Think of eating when you have a stuffed nose. The tastes are almost non-existent. Smells color those four flavors and give us nuances and a repertoire of flavors we easily recognize ( Mmm, I smell chocolate, bacon, roast turkey..).

No, it is not with smoke and mirrors that these aromas and flavors permeate the juice of fermented grapes. How is this possible? The answer is natural law. Wine is made from grapes…we all know that. But did you realize that wine is alive? Yes alive because it contains yeasts, which are living organisms. All living organisms change over time and conditions. The same is true for wine. As the grapes ferment and then age, many molecules develop. Here’s the great scientific fact: the same molecules that make strawberries smell and taste like strawberries can be present in some wines. So when you smell cherries, leather, coffee, nutmeg…in wine, yes, you really do smell those fruits flowers and spices. Tasting notes are supposed to help you identify and therefore appreciate the multiple and seemingly unrelated tastes and smells that rush at you when you taste wine.

With the help of tasting notes and lots of practice, you begin to sense the aromas and tastes together and recognize each flavor as it unfolds in layers. The aromas are manifestations of the characteristics of the specific grape(s) and the wine made with it. Each grape varietal exhibits specific aromas called Primary aromas. Many, or even most wines are a blend of several grape varietals, each with its own set of primary aromas. This is why lots of practice tasting is key. The aromas that result from the vinifying process are called secondary aromas and they indicate the wine’s origin and style. As a wine ages and oxidizes it gains tertiary aromas. Here’s where the fun really gets rolling. Tasting regularly becomes a mind puzzle as well as a sensual pleasure. Even in the early steps you recognize, but can’t name lots of aromas / flavors…just can’t put your finger on it. Memories come rushing from your mouth and nose to your brain faster than you can say Marcel Proust.

Most of what you will taste is revealed in repeated sniffing. As you start to sense more and more aromas, you will also notice that you taste these flavors in layers that develop in your mouth. After swallowing, exhale through the nose and observe the persistent aromas. This is called retro olfaction and it gives you the rounding out of the flavors.
Count the seconds the wine flavors last in your mouth. The longer the duration, the better the wine.

Mmmm. Enjoy the road.

Heard it Through the Grapevine: Tasting Notes or Testing Notesis part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Boomers Conquering Insomnia: Things to Play With After Midnight by BoomerYearbook.com

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

Boomer Yearbook

An inability to sleep can lead to a number of physical discomforts over time and eventually cause an emotional and physical lowering of resistance to disease. Sleep is the natural cure for so many disorders and the lack of it can make us stressed and exhausted very quickly. Aging baby boomers are in a particularly vulnerable group regarding sleep disorders and insomnia can be difficult to eradicate if it has been a long term problem.

One of the first things a typical sufferer of insomnia might do is resort to a sleeping pill. Aging baby boomers are among the worst offenders for dipping into old medication for a new disorder and will invariably try treating insomnia with a sleeping medication prescribed for an entirely different ailment in the past.

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A better way forward is to undergo a physical examination first, to see if there is any physical cause behind the inability to sleep through the night. Frequent trips to the bathroom in the night can be a typical sleep interrupter and might often be the forerunner of Diabetes, so a physical check up will help to put the mind at rest and might even be all that is needed to alleviate any underlying worry about physical health.

If there is no physical reason for the insomnia, the logical conclusion is that there is an emotional problem; perhaps a problem that is subconscious. The sufferer may actually be aware of why he or she is unable to sleep but at a loss to know how to overcome the problem.

On the list of things to play with when sleep eludes us is the television, but in fact watching a TV program can be over-stimulating, resulting in more sleep hours lost. A book is a better choice. Drinking coffee or tea before bed with a high caffeine content is always a bad idea: hot milk has a more calming effect, or a caffeine free herb tea is equally soothing. For baby boomers who tend to sit in a chair too long each day, some gentle exercise can help to stretch hours spent in sleep.

Organizing a healthy sleep routine is a good way to start when trying to cure insomniacs. Early rising one day and laying in bed until ten the following morning can upset the balance of rest and activity. Baby boomers who get out of bed by eight thirty each morning and endeavour to be in bed before midnight enjoy a better sleeping pattern. Try to fit social events around sleeping hours, rather that the other way around: as aging boomers are less able to cope with a broken routine. Cut out napping and go for a gentle walk instead.

Boomer Insomnia

Make a note of the sleeping pattern and the hours spent awake. If no improvement is noted over a few weeks, it is best to seek psychological advice rather than continue to suffer from lack of sleep, as there may be an underlying emotional problem best dealt with professionally.

The Psychological Article on Conquering Insomnia: Things to Play With After Midnight is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Criticizing Others: How to Quit by BoomerYearbook.com

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

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Psychological Articles by Boomeryearbook.com

Some baby boomers that spent a lifetime perfecting their ability to do their job well; perform as an efficient parent and stay in shape successfully enough to perform competitive sports reasonably well, have a propensity to criticize others who might not be as adept: so many of us enjoy the malicious satisfaction of pointing out other peoples’ shortcomings. Even worse, some of us gossip unkindly with so called friends about someone else’s inability to achieve, uncaring whether our thoughtlessness will hurt or offend.

In a way, this behavior sets us up for failure. Nobody can perform perfectly all the time and someone who has habitually criticized others will surely be a target for ridicule when their turn comes around; it always does. Psychological articles from the school of Positive Psychology teach us that this behavioral pattern is nothing more than personal insecurity – the drawing of attention to someone else’s defects in order to cover our own inadequacies.

For baby boomers with an active social life, the opportunities for criticism are almost limitless. Anyone with this kind of habit can find fault in abundance with so many ‘victims’ to choose from. However, the long reaching consequences of this kind of behavior include being marginalized by the people who take offence along the way. As they say, you cannot fool all of the people all of the time! Eventually, people exchange views and the culprit is targeted, usually by a group, and told to mend his or her ways and quick!

How do you stop? Where do you start? Taking an honest look at your inner self is a good beginning. Why does it matter to you if someone likes to wear ill matching clothes or drive a car that is too large or spend too much time in the bar? If their choices are not affecting you, why comment on them? Are you a critical person? Be truthful and give yourself the honest answers, because if you cannot perform this self analysis, there is little hope for improvement.

Once you have admitted that you have a habit, the way forward is obviously to break the chain of events that lead you to make spiteful and hurtful observations on a regular basis. Seeking the understanding of when you began to behave this way is sometimes a revealing and helpful analysis when seeking ways to change the format. Perhaps it was a reaction to being criticized in a personal manner which led you to hit back? Whatever the reason, the future has to bring permanent amendment.

Baby boomers have a huge capacity for enjoyment but this zest for life can be compromised by the one person in the group who offends everyone with an incessant zeal for knocking everyone else’s confidence. The decision to stop can be life changing and also life enhancing. The process of stopping might take a while, especially for baby boomers who have perfected the art of criticism over a lifetime of losing friends and social opportunities. Psychological articles deal with the process of identifying the triggers for criticism and advise how to change behavioral patterns that link to criticizing others.

The Psychological Article on Criticizing Others: How to Quit is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Letting Go of Stress and Resentment: Chilling Out by BoomerYearbook.com

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

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Psychological Articles by Boomeryearbook.com

For those lucky characters that are so laid back they are almost comatose, feelings of being ‘strung out’ and ‘tensed up’ are alien and outside their ability to comprehend efficiently. They get out of bed with a smile in the mornings, determined to enjoy their day no matter what happens around them. The boiler has burst? Oh good! A great opportunity to wear the new waders you got for Christmas! The car won’t start? Fantastic! Another day off! Baby boomers who go through their entire lives with an optimistic grin on their faces annoy the heck out of the rest of us, right? There is a happy middle ground, however, where we can all inject a little sunshine into our personality to make us good company and nice to be around.

Psychological articles on Positive Psychology have taught us that stress comes in large and the more popular travel sized package that is easier to deal with. When stress builds to a point where we can no longer tolerate it, our own boiler bursts and we go through what is commonly referred to as a ‘nervous breakdown’, where emotions take over and we are no longer in control of them. Letting go of excessive stress is imperative to achieve any peace or worthwhile enjoyment in later life.

Many baby boomers and others of retirement age, have contained stress for a great part of their life. While you are busy struggling with the corporate ladder and striving to achieve to make sure nobody takes your position from you, as well as battling with all the strain of bringing up children, stress sits neatly outside our range of vision. Often, as the welcome relief of retirement looms, stress crystallizes into an all consuming emotion; almost as if the mind says, “Okay, you can let go now…!” It can be disturbing and upsetting, especially for baby boomers, at a time when they think their lives will be clear sailing from now on…

There are psychological articles that deal with the serious and disturbing effects of having a nervous collapse and provide advice for sufferers on where to seek the professional care required for such illnesses. For those of us who are fortunate enough to be able to deal with stress levels that are within the limitations of our skill set, ‘chilling out’ is what is required!

Interestingly, the gift of overcoming excessive stress levels is often in a person’s ability to ‘shake off’ negativity. The ability to say “So..!?” and “Do I look like I care” – are all seemingly negative and unsympathetic responses to a problem but in fact they are healthy and successful ways to avoid becoming over involved in a situation that might otherwise topple personal confidence; raising stress levels and making the problem, in a way – bigger.

Baby boomers have less difficulty than some other generations in adopting a ‘couldn’t care less’ attitude and in some ways the trick is to care a little, rather than not at all!

The Psychological Article on Letting Go of Stress and Resentment: Chilling Out is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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How to Diffuse the Prickly Emotions Present in the Aging Baby Boomer or Elderly Loved One by BoomerYearbook.com

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

Diffuse Prickly Emotions in Baby Boomers or Elderly Loved Ones

Diffuse Prickly Emotions in Baby Boomers or Elderly Loved Ones


By Boomeryearbook.com

Age brings a plethora of aches, pains, intense emotions and feelings of isolation and loneliness most people could do without. Getting old is scary for anyone to look in the mirror and no longer recognize the tired reflection. Some aging baby boomers cope beautifully with old age and gracefully slip into a twilight phase with smiles on their faces; others find the transition into being a senior citizen impossible to deal with.

For aging baby boomers whose acceptance of older age is less than whole hearted, objections to what is happening to their bodies and minds as a result of the onset of elderly problems surface in a number of ways. These objections can materialize as moodiness or irritability, a propensity to be overly critical of others, contrariness, jealousy, attention seeking, and other anti social behavior patterns.

Dealing with someone who is displaying these unfortunate behavioral difficulties can be a trial. It is not a good idea to be over accepting of aging behavior when it is presenting disruption for the rest of the family. However, the situation involves chastising an aging baby boomer or senior and so must be approached carefully.

Always talk to an older person about this kind of problem privately and never in front of children or teenagers. Try to arrange a situation where you are being sociable yet in a quiet atmosphere, perhaps make some coffee and have a chat rather than conduct a lecture. Older people hate being criticized at the best of times and remember baby boomers are used to being in control. Be as diplomatic as you can but be resolved to say what you intended to say and do not be de-railed by heated denials or objections.

Gently explain that you are aware of how difficult it must be and how well your aging loved one has coped with these problems so far but some adjustments to behavior are necessary if everyone is to live together in harmony in the future. Baby boomers are intelligent and intuitive and will know exactly what is being said without it having to be broadcast over a loud speaker. A tactful and affectionate talk about what the problems are and how they might be resolved should be adequate to let the person know their behavior must change.

It is important that everyone makes an effort to be considerate of the aging person’s emotions. Although it is not strictly fair to allow one person more margin than another in terms of how to behave, older people might already be struggling to deal with elderly problems such as arthritis, poor eyesight, painful joints, and restrictive movements. Such complaints understandably cause fractiousness.

The most important aspect of dealing with an older person’s emotions is always to make your affections clearly visible. Never raise your voice to an elderly person and insist that nobody else in the family does either. After such discussions have taken place, allow the person some space and privacy to sulk if they wish; they will come around in their own time!

How to Diffuse the Prickly Emotions Present in Old Age is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Lack of Trust: How to Start Trusting Again

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

by BoomerYearbook.com

Lack of trust can kill any relationship. If a partner has cheated in the past or has a habit of lying then the inability to trust them is understandable. In fact in such cases the entire relationship may have to be re-evaluated. However, if one of the partners constantly doubts the other’s fidelity without having any justified reason to do so, then lack of trust is not just unfair to the other person but can also have disastrous consequences for the relationship.

If you find yourself constantly questioning your partner’s affections and motives, have a habit of cross checking their claims and statements with a third person, spy on them for no reason and have frequent arguments over your mistrusting nature, then you may be suffering from a chronic lack of trust. You are probably aware that your lack of trust has nothing to do with your partner; it’s like a bad habit, which has become a part of your personality. But the problem is that your habit probably hurts your partner more than you realize and before you know your relationship will start falling apart right in front of your eyes.

Causes of lack of trust

Your habit of mistrusting people who profess to love you could have its roots in your past. The following are some of the most common causes of this problem:

Emotional hurt—If in any of your previous relationships your partner cheated on you and you felt deeply hurt by the betrayal, it is possible that you moved on to the next relationship, without resolving your feelings. In such a case you might constantly compare your present partner with your ex and use your “lack of trust” as a defense mechanism against heartbreak.

History of betrayal- If you have been too naive and trusting in the past, it’s possible a lot of people may have taken you for a ride. This may have forced you to move to the other extreme of mistrusting anyone who tries to come close to you.

Childhood trauma- The experiences we go through as children play a huge role in shaping our personalities. If as a child you witnessed a parent’s infidelity or a bitter divorce, chances are that you will grow up into a person with a deep mistrust for people who profess to love you.

Conditioning- If a child is brought up by a single parent who was at receiving end of betrayal by his her partner; it’s possible that the parent might have unconsciously passed on generalized negative beliefs about the opposite sex to the child.

Low self esteem- A person suffering from low self-esteem might feel that they do not deserve the attention, care, and concern of anyone. They therefore have problems trusting the positive, healthy, and loving behavior of people around them and their negative self-talk forces them to look for an ulterior motive behind the most sincere actions.

How to start trusting again

If you can identify with any of these problems and want to learn to trust people again, without the constant fear of being taken advantage of, you need to let go of the past and make a fresh start. Practicing positive affirmations is one of the simplest ways to unlearn the old and learn a new way of living.

Positive Affirmations:

Your beliefs are a result of your repeated past experiences which cause conditioned patterns and perceptions. Positive affirmations involve persistently exposing yourself to new ideas, till your mind absorbs them as new internalized belief systems. The following affirmations will help you unlearn old patterns and accept new ideas about life and yourself.

Stand in front of a mirror and repeat each affirmation at least 30-40 times daily. A better idea would be to focus on one affirmation for a week and then move to the next one.

“I love and accept myself the way I am”

“I deserve to love and to be loved”

“It’s safe for me to love people and allow them to love me”

“I feel safe and trust the process of life to bring me the best, because that’s what I deserve”

“I let go of the past and welcome the future with open arms”

Practice these affirmations till they become a part of your new belief system.

When you refuse to trust people you stop life from bringing forth the possibilities of love and happiness that could be in store for you. When you live in fear of being let down, you miss the opportunity to love and feel loved. Give life a chance, after all it’s better to find love and lose it than live without knowing how beautiful love is.

Want more tips on overcoming mistrust and learning how to open yourself to the possibilities of love and happiness? Have a comment or question you’d like to share? Come join others at Boomer Yearbook for simple and effective coaching tips and strategies.

www.boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.

How to quit being a compulsive shopper

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

Psychological Articles by BoomerYearbook.com

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems: Compulsive Shopping

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems: Compulsive Shopping

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems

By Boomeryearbook.com

If you have a ‘shop till you drop’ attitude then you definitely need advice, as the compulsive shopping obsession is one of the major elderly problems and might easily land you in hard to resolve long term financial troubles. Psychological articles tell us that shopping addictions are quite common in modern times as many of us struggle to fight anxiety and stress by collecting beautiful, but unnecessary, new things that once bought, might never be used.

Psychological articles tell us that the number of female victims of this elderly problem is higher than males, as women indulge in this deceptively harmless activity to fight off loneliness, dissatisfaction with present life, stress, anxiety and depression. But to put it very honestly, compulsive shopping is not the solution to any of these elderly problems as it worsens psychological states by adding to debts and expenses; especially for “out of control” habitual credit card users.

However, if compulsive shopping is one of your elderly problems, take heart, as psychological articles tell us that with motivation and determination it is quite possible to rid yourself of this elderly problem. Just like any other addiction – such as alcoholism or gambling -the obvious solutions to compulsive shopping might appear difficult to act upon initially but with proper help and resolve, they are effectively combated in the long run.

Compulsive shopping elderly problems can be prevented if you find a reasonably strong diversion, something that would effectively keep you busy enough to stop you from thinking about spending money on not-needed stuff. For instance, try indulging yourself in a hobby or connecting with a card or book group to relieve stress, loneliness, or anxiety, or sign up for an interesting class that will challenge your mind, boost self esteem, and deter you from mindlessly grazing shopping malls.

Another idea to help limit unnecessary purchases it to create a reasonable shopping list of required items to help keep you focused and prevent purchasing unneeded, less useful items. It will keep you on track without making you spend more than you should. Additionally, paying by cash or check, and not using a credit card, is an effective strategy to help reduce the compulsive shopping urge.

One very important warning to help curtail the elderly problem of compulsive shopping is to avoid watching advertisements, TV shopping channels, and discount warehouse ads as they are too tempting for excessive shoppers. Also, a great idea is to leave your wallet at home while you go out for a nice walk, thus reducing the impulse to purchase and limiting your stroll to window shopping only. Another tip to help deal with this elderly problem is to avoid shopping or visiting shopping malls while you are visiting friends, as psychological articles warn us that usually people spend more money when shopping outside their home community.

It is important for all those with the elderly problems of compulsive shopping to sort out the causes behind their compulsive shopping addiction, as knowledge is power and the first step in controlling this behavior. Moreover, one has to make a conscious decision to control shopping urges in order to find a positive solution to this problem.

If you feel that your shopping compulsion has spiraled out of control, please consult a professional therapist or counselor. Psychological articles tell us that NPL or Neuro-Linguistic Programming is an effective treatment as it tackles the problem from the grass root level, that is, the mind, and that hypnotherapy or self-hypnosis can also be very helpful in stopping the elderly problem of compulsive shopping.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Baby Boomers Update Guide to Obsessive Compulsive Disorder by BoomerYearbook.com

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

This series of articles from Boomer Yearbook explores the frightening and varied behavioral patterns that occur through obsession; the dangers of leaving an obsession untreated and the coaching solutions available: Boomer Yearbook’s Guide and Coaching Strategy for the baby boomer generation.

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems
By Boomeryearbook.com

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Only a few decades ago, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder was unheard of. Anyone displaying the kind of symptoms we see today in a sufferer of this distressing disorder would be labeled as simply ‘weird’ or freaky’. Elderly baby boomers would not have heard of ‘OCD’ as we know it during their youth, nor would they have known anyone suffering with the symptoms, probably because someone in the grip of OCD would have been embarrassed and would have hidden symptoms.

What are the symptoms, exactly?

Psychological articles show us that OCD presents through strange rituals practiced by the sufferer to cope with feelings that they are threatened in some way. This threat might be in the form of fear that their family will abandon them; fear that their partner will leave; fear that their children love someone else more than them; irrational pessimism that they are going to come to some harm at the hands of even people they love: baby boomers suffering with OCD might have a tendency to arrange ornaments on a shelf exactly the same distance apart, or possibly “hoard” things such as refusing to throw out newspapers or collecting objects.

Other rituals might involve checking that doors and windows are locked before leaving the house, six; seven; eight; up to thirty or even forty or so times, never satisfied that they have properly locked each area of the house until someone finally ‘rescues’ them by assuring them everything is securely locked and safe. Oddly, this reassurance is usually accepted, no matter who is doing the assuring, and the sufferer seems almost relieved to be able to walk away from the task they are obsessed with, probably exhausted and happy to hand the responsibility of the locked windows and doors to another person.

OCD might also compel someone to dust or polish each area of their house six or seven times, each time with a different cloth, and in sequence. The sequence must not be interrupted – if it is, the person has to start all over again with the first cloth, then the second, and so on…

Psychological articles tell us that frequent and ritualistic hand washing and the need to count possessions are also symptoms of OCD and many sufferers spend days on end, re-washing laundry in an endless quest to re-clean and re-stack perfectly clean and neatly piled clothes and bed linen. For baby boomers with OCD, cupboards must be stacked just so; closets must have hangers facing the right direction and all hangers must be color-co-ordinated with the items in the closet. Curiously, washing must be “pegged” with color-matched plastic pegs and the washing spaced correctly…
What happens if the ritual is upset?

OCD sufferers are invariably quite happy to re-start a ritual; therefore the possibility of being interrupted is not so upsetting as one might think, although there are exceptions.
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is socially embarrassing so often sufferers will keep their problem secret, enabling the condition to worsen considerably before professional help is finally sought.
The causes of OCD are suspected to be hereditary via the maternal link, or the result of a lack of Serotonin in the brain. Other theories explore the possibility of natural physical changes causing an imbalance that triggers the condition but no actual cause is definitively verified.

For baby boomers who suspect they have some or all of the symptoms of OCD, counseling should be sought to combat the symptoms or at least to reduce them. Research from psychological articles ascertains that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) might also be a solution to treating the disorder by introducing alternative ideas and thought processes. The bottom line is if you or a loved one suffer from this disorder, help is available: there is no need to suffer in silence.

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The Psychological Article on Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Modern Man and His Challenge to Please Everyone by BoomerYearbook.com

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

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Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems
by Boomeryearbook.com

This series of articles from Boomer Yearbook explores the fascinating and varied behavioral patterns that occur when families are affected by outside events, or by the impact of the modern World; the challenges faced by men of the new age and the hurdles that must be addressed: Boomer Yearbook’s Guide and Coaching Strategy for the baby boomer generation.

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Baby boomers had it good in many respects. Life in the mid twentieth century was nothing if not straightforward and relatively affluent. Family life was fairly conventional and boomers’ dads went to work to earn the money to support Stay At Home Mom and the kids. In the modern environment, fragmentation has produced multiple roles for modern men and women.

Women are no longer content to read up on new recipes and allow the man to make all the major decisions that affect her and her children. Women in modern society work ambitiously within their chosen careers and sometimes achieve better success than their male colleagues. Children are valued but sometimes come second to their mother’s ambition to succeed. Her partner must therefore necessarily take on a greater responsibility at home to support her schedule. Elderly baby boomers sometimes view this arrangement as unworkable and often attempt to divert working mothers to stay at home more.

Psychological articles from the schools of Attachment, Object Relations, and Positive Psychology support that men in the twenty first century are expected to achieve spectacularly in a number of areas that include being a practical, hands-on father, a supportive husband to a working mother, a source of pride to the baby boomers who are his own parents and a reliable provider.

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In the forties and fifties, university entrance was considered to be highly expensive and reserved for the ultra intelligent. In our egalitarian society, almost 10% of the American population hold a Master’s Degree or higher and every citizen is deemed to deserve the opportunity to attend university: the onus is on modern parents to provide the means. Baby boomers more often than not chose to send their kids to college and university but were not as likely to be pressured into doing so. As more pressure is applied for men to comply with the criteria imposed by society, more areas within which to fail are presented. This causes greater stress levels, along with an even higher incidence of failed marriages.

Attaining a college degree does not necessarily guarantee employment, as the job market has been severely compromised by the failing economy in the past few years. Even more responsibility weighs on the shoulders of modern man as he struggles to keep his job and juggle his home life, anxious that should he lose his job, the likelihood of his finding another are slimmer than they have been for twenty years. With the cost of living at an all time high, he certainly has his hands full trying to make ends meet.

Baby boomers with an ear to the ground and a sense of perception appreciate that career and family life are not as simple as they once were and provide moral support to sons and grandsons caught within complicated and pressured modern lifestyles. Psychological articles cover the subject of modern stress triggers and cite marital problems; career pressure and financial worries among the top contenders for causing undue anxiety and distress in men today.

The Psychological Article on Modern Man and His Challenge to Please Everyone is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Juggling Roles: Modern Man’s Keeping a Career and Being There for Family by BoomerYearbook.com

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

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Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems
by Boomeryearbook.com

This series of articles from Boomer Yearbook explores the fascinating and varied behavioral patterns that occur when families are affected by outside events, or by the impact of the modern World; the challenges faced by men of the new age and the hurdles that must be addressed: Boomer Yearbook’s Guide and Coaching Strategy for the baby boomer generation.

The older generation of male baby boomers were hard working, responsible fathers and figures who drew respect from their families, especially their sons. As these sons lived in a modern environment, their values and expectations changed to embrace unorthodox, sometimes fragmented family structures that might include step children and second or even third wives.

Baby boomers representing the elderly part of the community enjoyed a relatively straightforward structure within the family unit. In a family where the mother and father have been together since their twenties, there is a level of financial security achieved in later life; whereas there might be financial hardship caused by multiple alimony payments and child support obligations for modern men with a series of broken relationships behind them.

Escalating costs make it imperative that men earn more in order to pay more. The problem is pandemic in that children are produced from one relationship, which breaks up: more children are produced within subsequent partnerships as the man might move on to link up with a childless woman who expresses a need to have a baby and so on…Men in general have become somewhat prolific when it comes to producing multiple families and the price is financial insecurity.

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A career is all important to a man with heavy responsibilities both old and new. As men feel pressured to perform at work, their home life might suffer considerable neglect. Men often spend a great deal of time racing from one obligation to another at breakneck speed to satisfy needs in all areas of their lives. Eventually, stress can take hold and psychological articles from the schools of Attachment, Object Relations, and Positive Psychology clearly outline how the pressures of being professionally and personally successful can lead to feelings of failure; guilt at not achieving; depression and emotional illness.

Men will sometimes experience a totally different lifestyle with different partners. A man might enjoy a traditional relationship with his first wife who is a Stay At Home Mother; happy to give up her career to raise the children, similar to the baby boomers’ marriage his own parents had. Should the marriage break up and the man takes a second wife, he could easily find his second experience quite different and be expected to take an equal role with home responsibilities. So here he finds a conflict of roles, as he still has contact with his first family and must somehow make his two roles compatible. Baby boomers look on as interested spectators in such situations.

Psychological articles note that a man will often feel obliged to have the children of his multiple relationships exist in a friendly, parallel environment: their acceptance of their respective home situations helps their father to feel less guilty and less threatened by feelings of having ‘abandoned’ his children. In fact, children faced with younger half brothers and sisters quite often readily accept their new status but encounter conflicting loyalties as a result of their mother’s resentment of the step children, even going so far as to ‘hide’ their affections for their father’s other children from their mother.

The Psychological Article on Juggling Roles: Keeping a Career and Being There for Family is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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