Posts Tagged ‘optical illusions’

Online Optical Illusion: Café Wall Illusion

Wednesday, March 25th, 2009

Psychological Articles Explaining Online Optical Illusions

By Boomeryearbook.com

Café Wall Illusion is a classical online optical illusion; reported in 1979 by Professor Richard L. Gregory and Priscilla Heard of The University of Bristol, England. They derived this pattern from a pile of white and black ceramic tiles on the front wall of a café at St Michael’s Hill, Bristol. Later, this pattern became a very popular online optical illusion. This online optical illusion is another example of the limitations in the human optical system, leading the brain to form deceptive impressions.

cafe-wall-illusion_online-optical-image-n

In this optical illusion, your see rows of alternate black and white blocks with gray borders. What do you perceive about the horizontal lines in this online optical illusiononline optical illusion are parallel and straight. Don’t believe us? Measure it yourself by placing a ruler against each line.

Explanation of Café Wall online optical illusion

There are various explanations for the Café Wall online optical illusion. Psychological articles give a neuropsychological explanation suggesting that this online optical illusion results from limitations in the balancing act of the inhibitory and excitatory neurons in the brain. Psychological articles inform us that inhibitory neurons dim down perceived bright areas while excitatory neurons brighten perceived dark areas. Hence, in this online optical illusion, the areas in which white is prominent, become dimmed, and the areas surrounded by dark areas are brightened.

Moreover, the limitation in the reaction between the two neurons projects slopes on the straight line. The slopes are in opposite directions according to the dimmed and brightened areas. Hence, you see the straight lines in this online optical illusion to be wavy.

The Café Wall online optical illusion works on the principle of contrast. Along with numerous other online optical illusions explained in Boomer Yearbook that also result from the effect of contrast on the perception of the visual stimulus.

This Psychological Article on Online Optical Illusions is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of out of the box suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems and keep our brains young. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Ambiguous Online Optical Illusions

Wednesday, March 25th, 2009

Psychological Articles Explaining Online Optical Illusions

By Boomeryearbook.com

The Web is a storehouse of a plethora of online optical illusions. These online optical illusions can be categorized into various groups; with Ambiguous online optical illusion being one classification. In ambiguous illusions, the foreground and the background are the main factors that create the deceptive illusion.

Swiss artist Sandro Del-Prete is credited for the creation of some really cool paintings, such as “The Message of Love from the Dolphins”, “Folded Chess Set”, and ‘St. George The Dragon Slayer”. These paintings have become popular online optical illusions that have mesmerized many Web surfers. The online optical illusion “St. George the Dragon Slayer” is a portrait of St. George: Check out the following figure.

st-george-the-dragon-slayer_online-optical-illusion-k
Sandro Del-Prete

If you look carefully at this online optical illusion, you can also see the less obvious fight between St. George and the dragon. Can’t see it? Let me give you a hint. Look at St. George’s hair to see St. George on a horse fighting the dragon.

“St. George The Dragon Slayer” is a wonderful example of an ambiguous online optical illusions; as it shows that an ambiguous online optical illusion is a combination of two actual comprehensible images. It creates an illusion because the human eye focuses on one particular visual element and brings it to the foreground. The other elements act as the background. The brain perceives the image in the foreground while the background acts merely as a complement to the foreground image. By changing the viewer’s focus of sight, (i.e., telling the viewer where to look) you can shift the foreground and the background in ambiguous online optical illusions to see the background image. However, you cannot see both images at the same time. This is where online optical illusions come in.

Sandro Del-Prete has not only created this wonderful painting, “St George The Dragon Slayer”, but the painting is also an online optical illusion that has mesmerized, tricked and amazed human eyes.

This Psychological Article on Online Optical Illusions is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of out of the box suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems and keep our brains young. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Optical Illusions: Perception, Observation, and Imagination

Wednesday, December 24th, 2008

by BoomerYearbook.com

At some point in our lives, all of us have encountered the phenomenon of optical illusions and many of us have wondered exactly what is it that causes these varying perceptions. In 1992, Matthew Luckiesh in his book “Visual Illusions: Their Causes, Characteristics and Applications”, illuminated three main causative factors in optical illusions; perception, imagination, and observation. While most of us possess an imagination, some of us are blessed with being able to imagine in intricate multifaceted dimensional ways whereas others are more concrete and conservative imaginers. Aside from the powers of imagination, individuals also are unique in their abilities to observe and perceive. As Luckiesh said, “only part of what is perceived comes through the senses from the object. The remainder always comes from within.”

Thus if an individual were to take a look at the four above pictures, they would “see” these objects from their unique viewpoint of subjective Imagination, Observation and Perception.

It’s a neat little exercise that you can try with your friends. It doesn’t mean you should try and analyze their answers. It’s meant to be a fun exercise just to show that a picture is truly worth a thousand words, and there is a great deal of grey area when we talk about “objective” perception.

Now if these pictures were put in front of me for example and I had to use my imagination; this is what I would have come up with.

In picture one I would imagine this as being a music stand to hold sheet music. The arrow would be just as it seems a simple arrow. Bet you can guess right off the top I don’t have a vivid imagination. With the second picture, I would have to say the writing gives away the picture but you had to admit it looks more like a tree than a bush, while at least to me. I really had to study picture three to determine that it looked like a birds head. Number four was intriguing in that it had no beginning or an end.

Now if we move on to the observation part of this exercise how many can honestly say they noticed the background. If you were to place your hand over the picture do you really think you would recall the background colors? Interestingly some people would whereas others won’t.

From my personal subjective point of view, I found the pictures mundane and unexciting. Can you guess that I am not an artist or architect, and alas, not even a particularly creative imaginer? However, when comparing notes with my co-worker, she was able to create wonderful three dimensional possibilities and could study the pictures for the smallest of clues. Ah, but she is a gestalt psychologist and told me that the reason I could not see a beginning or end to picture number four is that our minds create a “completeness” and fill in perceptual blanks. Personally, I found picture number four to be most interesting…Hmm. Wonder what that says about me?

Carrying out an exercise such as I have outlined here is for entertainment purposes only. It can be fascinating to hear the perceptions from a group of friends than just singly looking at the illusions.

If there were anything to be learned from this exercise of comparing viewpoints on optical illusions it’s to recognize just how differently individuals perceive any situation. It’s always interesting to note how several people can look at one situation yet all take something different from its context.

You could even go a step further with this exercise and ask each person to make up a story about the picture. Then you will be in for some real fun. Or if you are the more scholarly type, you can read more on the psychological study of perception or the philosophical understanding of epistemology (study of human knowledge), or you can join boomer yearbook and hear what others have to say.


www.boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.

How Normal is your Brain???

Wednesday, November 5th, 2008

 

 

If your brain works normally this is neat.

This is another example of an amazing illusion!!! The last sentence is so true.

If your eyes follow the movement of the rotating pink dot, the dots will remain only one color, pink.

How Normal is your Brain

 

However if you stare at the black ” + ” in the center, the moving dot turns to green.

Now, concentrate on the black ” + ” in the center of the picture. After a short period, all the pink dots will slowly disappear, and you will only see only a single green dot rotating.

It’s amazing how our brain works. There really is no green dot, and the pink ones really don’t disappear. This should be proof enough; we don’t always see what we think we see.

Want to continue to challenge your brain? Check out www.boomeryearbook.com for more amazing brain teasers and optical illusions.

Pyramids

Saturday, November 1st, 2008

Who is Who?

Saturday, November 1st, 2008

If your daughter’s brother is Tony’s uncle and

Tony is the only son of Martha,

what is your relationship with Martha?

[polldaddy poll=1002899]

Is She Looking at You?

Saturday, November 1st, 2008

Three Men in a Hotel

Saturday, November 1st, 2008

Three men decided to split the cost of a hotel room. The hotel manager gave them a price of $30. The men split the bill evenly, each paying $10, and retired to their room.

However, the manager realized that it was a Wednesday night, which meant the hotel had a special: rooms were only $25. He had overcharged them $5!

He promptly called the bellboy, gave him five one-dollar bills and told him to return it to the men. When the bellboy explained the situation to the men, they were so pleased at the honesty of the establishment that they promptly tipped the bellboy $2 of the $5 he had returned and each kept $1 for himself.

The Problem: Each of the three men ended up paying $9 (their original $10, minus $1 back) totalling $27, plus $2 for the bellboy makes $29. Where did the extra dollar go?

Solution:

The faulty reasoning lies in the addition at the end. 3 x $9 does equal $27, but the $2 tip is included in that $27, so it makes no sense to add the $2 to $27 to make $29. They paid $25 for the hotel room, $2 for the tip ($27), and then got $1 back each to make the original $30.

You were on my mind

Saturday, November 1st, 2008

Take a very close look at this image!

Looks like something on this man’s mind…

The Man in the Coffee Beans

Saturday, November 1st, 2008

The “illusion” is that this is just a picture of coffee beans; but it is not. Can you find a man’s face among the beans? Some say that if you find the man in 3 seconds or less, the right half of your brain may be more well developed than most.

PS: This is not a trick. A man’s face is really hidden among the beans.