Posts Tagged ‘Online Optical Illusions’

Spinning Girl Genius Test

Tuesday, May 19th, 2009

Spinning Girl Genius Test

Spinning Girl Genius Test

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and collection of original Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Effect of After-Image and Online Optical Illusion

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

Pscyhological Article on After Image Effects in Online Optical Illusions

Pscyhological Article on After Image Effects in Online Optical Illusions

Psychological Article Explaining After-Image in Online Optical Illusions


By Boomeryearbook.com

Online optical illusions result from varying artificially constructed factors as well as resulting from imperfections in the optical system. One of these features that contributes to the development of online optical illusions is the after-image effect. Psychological articles explain the ‘After image’ as the effects wherein the eyes continue seeing an object even after you have stopped looking at the object. The after-image effect enables the formation of many magical online optical illusions.

The formation of American flag is a popular online optical illusion incorporating the after-image effect. Take a look at the above picture.

It may be really surprising to find that yes, this online optical illusion will create the American Flag. We’ll show you how this happens utilizing after-images to create the red white and blue impression of the American flag.

Where is the American Flag?

The American flag is right here, in this online optical illusion. Fix your sight at the border between the yellow box and the strips in this image for about 20 seconds. If you still do not see the American flag, shift your vision to a white surface. You will find the American flag there, with red and white strips and white stars in a blue rectangle. It appears as an after-image of the original flag. Ok, baby boomers. We think you’ll agree this is a really a cool online optical illusion and we’re happy to use this psychological article to explain how this works.

Why did the color changed in the after-image?

In this online optical illusion, the colors change from cyan to red, black to white, and yellow to blue. According to psychological articles, the photoreceptive cells in the retina become less responsive to a particular color as you stare at it for a period of time. When the after-image is formed, the object is projected in the complementary color of the original color. In the current online optical illusion, red, white, and blue are the complementary colors of cyan, black, and yellow respectively. Hence, you see the American flag in the after-image.

Boomer Yearbook has brought you many other online optical illusions such as The “Face of Jesus” and ” Bird and Cage”, online optical illusions based on the after-image effect.

This Psychological Article on Online Optical Illusions is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of out of the ordinary suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems and keep our brains young. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Online Optical Illusion Due to Retinal Rivalry

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

Psychological Article Explaining Online Optical Illusion of Retinal Rivalry

Psychological Article Explaining Online Optical Illusion of Retinal Rivalry

Psychological Article Explaining Online Optical Illusions

By Boomeryearbook.com

The human eyes are very complex in both their structure and function. This complexity often leads to the creation of optical illusions, including online optical illusions. The retinas of the two eyes act as two independent monocular fields. These fields try to gain supremacy over each other. There are numerous online optical illusions based on this rivalry between an individual’s two eyes.

Online optical illusions formed based on this rivalry are more apparent when there are two or more objects of different colors in the visual field. The focus of the eyes keeps fluctuating from one color to another due to the rivalry of the retinas. As a result of this fluctuation, the brain perceives a kind of movement from one color to another and sees static elements of different colors in motion. Many online optical illusions incorporate this feature to stun the human eye; such as the above online optical illusion example.

What do you notice in this online optical illusion? At first glance, you will see that the circles made of white, blue, and red colors appear to revolve. Now, take a closer look at each element independently. They are actually static elements. The movement of the circle in this online optical illusion is just a visual trick.

The trick to making this online optical illusion appear to be moving lies in the rivalry between the two retinas of the eyes. The focus keeps fluctuating from one color to another due to the rivalry creating a motion from one color to another; thus making the circles appear to revolve. Additionally, the contrast of the yellow and gray backgrounds also aids in producing the revolving effect in this online optical illusion.

It is easy to incorporate this visual feature in numerous online optical illusions. The scope of what you can create is endless. You can use this feature to make the motion of the illusion appear to move center to outward or to make wavy online optical illusions. Now that you know the trick. Enjoy!

This Psychological Article on Online Optical Illusions is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of out of the ordinary suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems and keep our brains young. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Online Optical Illusion: Muller-Lyer Illusion

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

Online Optical Illusion of Muller-Lyer

Online Optical Illusion of Muller-Lyer

Psychological Article Explaining The Role of Perspective in Online Optical Illusions


By Boomeryearbook.com

“Seeing is believing.” Do you think that what ever you see is worth believing? Think again. There are a large number of online optical illusions that show what you see and not you think you see are not a one to one perfect match. The Muller-Lyer illusion is one such online optical illusion. This online optical illusion works on the principle of perspective. Psychological articles suggest that brain perceives an object at a farther point to be bigger than an object that is at a nearer point due to the effect of perspective.

In Muller-Lyer online optical illusion, the eye is deceived into thinking there is a difference from the original length of two lines when arrows are added pointing in different directions.

Which of the line two lines in this online optical illusion is longer? The second line with the outward arrow flaps definitely looks longer. However, the two lines are identical in length. Don’t believe us? Take a ruler to ascertain the lengths of both lines for yourself.

There are three main causes for the trick in this online optical illusion.

• The visual angle or the “perspective” gets smaller with distance. Therefore, the brain automatically perceives objects at farther distances to be bigger.

• We are familiar with lines that have inward flaps, such as corner of a building, which are relatively the nearest points of the overall object. Similarly, lines with outward flaps are found at the longer distance, as the farthest corner of a room. The brain perceives both the lines in this online optical illusion in relation to prior perceptions.

• In this online optical illusion, the brain perceives the line with outward flaps to be at a farther point as compared to the line with inward flaps. Consequently, the brain perceives the line with outward flaps to be longer.

Based on the principle of “perspective”, the deception of this online optical illusion is not limited to only the lines; as the visual deception may be any object or figure. Hence, many artists have used the principle of “perspective” to create various online optical illusions.

This Psychological Article on Online Optical Illusions is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of out of the ordinary suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems and keep our brains young. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Online Optical Illusion: Hermann Grid

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

By Boomeryearbook.com

Contrast is an important element that contributes to the formation of online optical illusions. The Hermann Grid is one of the most popular optical illusions that is based on the element of contrast. In the Hermann Grid, the effect of contrast produces an illusion of a new color apart from the original colors forming the grid.

Psychological Article explaining Hermann Grid Online Optical Illusion

Psychological Article explaining Hermann Grid Online Optical Illusion

Look at this online optical illusion and try to count the number of colors in the grid. How many colors do you see? You will see two colors distinctly; white and black. Do you also see gray colors at each of the intersections?

Now focus your sight at each intersection. Do you still see the gray colors? Surprisingly, the gray colors have vanished. The gray colors that appear at the intersections are not really present there. They are actually illusions.

What is the Scientific Reason of Hermann Grid online optical illusion?

The gray colors in this online optical illusion are due to the adjustment of brightness of an image on the eye’s retinal cells. The near-center of the retina has the highest resolution vision while the periphery has lower resolution vision. In the periphery of the retina, the brightness of the image is reduced significantly producing the graying effect in online optical illusions.

Explaining Hermann Grid Online Optical Illusion

In the Hermann Grid online optical illusion, when you focus your sight exactly at the intersections, the image falls at the near-center of the retina. Hence, you see the exact color, which is white. You also see the white colors between the black squares as exactly the same because the brightness is balanced between the white and the black areas. However, when you do not look at the intersections, but at the image as a whole, (the Gestalt of the image) the image of the intersections fall to the periphery of the eye’s retina. This results in a decrease in the brightness of the area. Hence, you see gray colors at the intersections in this online optical illusion. Fascinating, isn’t it?

This Psychological Article on Online Optical Illusions is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of out of the ordinary suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems and keep our brains young. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Online optical illusion: Visual interpretation

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

Online Optical Illusions: Visual Interpretation

Online Optical Illusions: Visual Interpretation

By Boomeryearbook.com

The Web is full of online optical illusions that occur due to human imperfections in interpretation of visual data. The human eye collects the visual data of an object. The nervous system then interprets these data. The eye can be frequently deceived and may not always record the exact data, which results in optical illusions, including online optical illusions. However, even when the eye records the exact data, the brain may not be able to interpret the data. This also leads to online optical illusions.

When an individual sees an object, the brain compares it with its nearest element or adjoining element. The brain then makes an interpretation of the object in relationship with its adjoining element. This factor often leads to misinterpretation of the visual element, and to online optical illusions, as shown in the figure.

In this online optical illusion, can you recognize the bigger element? The element in red looks much bigger than the element in orange. Is the element in red actually bigger than the element in orange? The answer is No. The elements in this online optical illusion are actually identical in size. If you don’t believe it try comparing the corresponding edge.

Why do the elements in this online optical illusion look different in size?

The answer lies in how the brain interprets this image. The eye sees both elements properly. However, when the brain interprets this online optical illusion, it compares the long edge of the red element to the adjoining short edge of the orange element. Accordingly, the brain interprets the red element to be bigger than the orange element in thus creating an online optical illusion, and a feature frequently seen in many other online optical illusions.

Do you think that the color might have enhanced the effect? You can find out very easily. Create a similar online optical illusion without any color. Then you will discover the role of color in aiding this online optical illusion trick.

This Psychological Article on Online Optical Illusions is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of out of the ordinary suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems and keep our brains young. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Online Optical Illusion Based on Size

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

Psychological Articles Explaining Online Optical Illusions

By Boomeryearbook.com

In the wide range of online optical illusions available on the Web, many of them are based on the relative size of the visual elements in a visual frame. The perception of the visual elements is not an independent action. We perceive a visual element in connection with other visual elements. The same is true for online optical illusions. Psychological and Neuropsychological articles suggest that an object appears larger when placed with smaller objects and vice versa. This phenomenon has been incorporated into online optical illusions and has fun, amazing effects.

Comparison of Two Circles

Comparisons of geometrical figures are very popular online optical illusions found on the Web.

Figure 1 shows an online optical illusion that compares two circles surrounded by circles of different size.

Figure 1

Figure 1

In this online optical illusion, black circles of smaller sizes surround one white circle while bigger black circles surround another circle. When we look at this online optical illusion, the white circle surrounded by smaller back circles looks bigger than the circle surrounded by bigger black circles. But, are you sure that the size of these white circles are different? You will be surprised to know that these circles are actually same in size. Is it hard to believe? Then, draw a diameter of each of these circles and measure the length. You will find that your eyes are deceiving you. The truth is they are the same size.

The same effect holds true in other geometrical figures as well.

Comparison of two lines

Figure 2 shows an online optical illusion with two vertical lines of same size. However, when you look at this image, your brain perceives the vertical line on the right to be longer. It is due to the smaller space within the two horizontal lines as compared to that of the vertical line in the left.

Figure 2

Figure 2

This visual effect is used in many online optical illusions to trick the human eye. You can also easily create an online optical illusion of your own using this visual effect.

This Psychological Article on Online Optical Illusions is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of out of the ordinary suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems and keep our brains young. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Online Optical Illusions and Visual Effects

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

Pscyhological Article Explaining Visual Effects in Online Optical Illusions

Pscyhological Article Explaining Visual Effects in Online Optical Illusions

By Boomeryearbook.com

As cited in Boomer Yearbook’s ongoing series of psychological articles explaining online optical illusions visual elements play a very important role in both creating and understanding the mechanisms behind online optical illusion tricks. These visual elements, when placed systematically in relationship to each other, can produce many effective online optical illusions. When the human eye looks at a visual element, it collects the visual data of the surrounding elements as well. The brain, also, interprets the particular visual element in relationship with the surrounding elements. In addition to the surrounding elements, the background also aids in producing very effective online optical illusions.

An example of a common online optical illusion that follows this principle of visual elements is the double-sided checkerboard.

In this online optical illusion, when you look at the lower half, you will see a checkerboard on the ground. On the other hand, you will see a floating checkerboard when you see the upper half; and it becomes an online optical illusion if you look at the full image.

How do you explain this online optical illusion?

• First, let us consider the lower half of this online optical illusion. You notice the seven white dots and the background then you relate it with prior visual data stored in your brain. You perceive this image in relationship with some objects placed on the edge of a plane surface. The background, which looks like some solid material on the ground, also aids in your perception that the checkerboard is on the ground and the white dots are placed on it.

• Second, in the upper half of this online optical illusion, the six black arcs are placed as if they are on the edge of a shelf. Moreover, the sky as background projects the checkerboard as floating in the air.

• When viewed as a whole image, you are unable to understand the number of sides of the checkerboard in this online optical illusion.

You can find a wide range of online optical illusions incorporating this trick. To unravel this kind of online optical illusions, all you have to do is separate each visual element and look at them independently. Do you think that this online optical illusion will have the same effect if the background was the same? We at Boomer Yearbook hope you’ll experiment and let us know.

The Psychological Article on Online Optical Illusions is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of out of the ordinary suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Online Optical Illusion: Experience and Perception

Monday, March 23rd, 2009

By Boomeryearbook.com

To a very great extent, our visual sense is not “objective” in that there is not a perfect one to one ratio between what we see and how we make sense of what we see. In fact, oftentimes our brain interprets what our eyes perceive based not solely on the visual stimuli we are looking at but on our cognitions and experiences.
(http://boomeryearbook.com/blog/2009/03/15/psychological-article-types-of-online-optical-illusions/)

Many online optical illusions capitalize on this common miscommunication between our eyes and our brains, and use it to create online optical illusions; especially of the Cognitive type. Thus, when looking at an online optical illusion, the human brain takes in the visual stimuli and then connects it to past cognitions and experiences, matching the stimuli to our cultural and experiential “Gestalt”, In other words, perceiving the online optical illusion in the context of what is familiar and previously stored in our brains as meaningfully recognizable.

One of the classical online optical illusions that illustrates this example is the “Message of Love from the Dolphins” by Swiss artist Sandro Del-Prete.

message-of-love-from-dolphins

Hmmm. What do you see? Well, before jumping to judgmental conclusions about this online optical illusion, it’s important to know that psychological articles inform us that adults see something very different than does the typical child.

If you are an adult, you will probably see two individuals in an intimate position in this online optical illusion. That is all right. Most adults will see the same. It is because you have prior knowledge of what lovemaking is. However, I have to disappoint you. In fact, this image is not of two individuals in an intimate position.

Psychological articles advise us to perform this little experiment. Ask some small children with no knowledge of lovemaking to tell you what they see in this online optical illusion. Will they perceive the image as adults do? Psychological articles tell us the answer is no. In fact, they see nine dolphins in a bottle on this online optical illusion. You may be surprised but it is true. Take another good look to this online optical illusion to find the nine dolphins.

Have you found the nine dolphins in this online optical illusion? If not, let me suggest that you concentrate on the black spots within the picture that you perceived to be human figures.

When you look at this online optical illusion, you perceived the image in connection with your prior knowledge that is within your realm of familiar experiences.

However, for a kid, this online optical illusion is just a school of dolphins in a bottle because they do not have any knowledge about the intimate position.

Don’t believe us at Boomer Yearbook? Check it out for yourself.

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological Articles based-Informational Social Network Website for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join now to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and discover the many ways this website for baby boomers can contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness.

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Online Optical Illusion: The Hidden Tiger

Monday, March 23rd, 2009

By Boomeryearbook.com

Do you believe the statement “The first impression is the last impression” is true? Think again. There are various online optical illusions that will prove this quote wrong. When individuals look at an image, they try to perceive it in relationship to something that is most closely related to something they have experienced before. Psychological articles tell us that banking on this nature, creators of online optical illusions have created various illusions to play trick on the viewers.

The ‘The Hidden Tiger’ is one of those online optical illusions that tricks the human eye based on the way the human organizes visual sensory input.

hidden-tiger-optical-illusion1

What is your first impression of this online optical illusion? Your first impression may be that it is a picture of a tiger in the woods. You will also see the trees and the grasses. This is where our first impression can prove to be deceptive or incomplete.

Take another look. Do you see anything else? To be more precise, do you see ‘The Hidden Tiger’ in this online optical illusion? Take a closer look and try to find ‘The Hidden Tiger.’

If you still cannot find ‘The Hidden Tiger’, look closely at the tiger’s stripes. Can you now see the ‘The Hidden Tiger’ in this online optical illusion?. Most probably yes. Are you wondering how you missed it in the first trial? Well, you are far from alone and there is nothing to worry about. The majority of people looking at this oonline optical illusion tend to see the “whole” of the big tiger, not the hidden tiger as the way we perceive something is based on matching the perception of the new stimuli and generalizing it to something familiar of which we have stored prior knowledge.

Taking a first look at this online optical illusion of ‘The Hidden Tiger’ demonstrates that first impressions are seldom true; they are more accurately based on past perceptions and not just current stimuli. Thus the human brain’s way of generalizing sensory information provides the source of online optical illusion tricks, and encourages us to take a closer look at what we see in the world around us.

So, after “reframing” how you look at this online optical illusion, do you still believe the statement “The first impression is the last impression” is true? We at Boomer Yearbook would love to encourage you to look again.

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological Articles based-Informational Social Network Website for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join now to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and discover the many ways this website for baby boomers can contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness.

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