Posts Tagged ‘baby boomers’

Baby Boomers Guide to Anger: Why Me? The Second Stage of Grief

Sunday, September 20th, 2009

Kubler Ross Stages of Grief

Kubler Ross Stages of Grief


Elderly Problems by Boomeryearbook.com

Baby boomers in the second stage of grieving can be hard to put up with. The second stage in the process can be confrontational moodiness, unreasonable demanding and downright rude behavior. The grieving process is a roller coaster of emotions from start to finish and often leaves a fall out of broken friendships as grieving baby boomers blame everyone in the world for being left without a much loved partner; from the doctors to the medication to the incompetence of the funeral director. What they are really doing is hurting so badly they cannot cope and anger can sometimes be a way of dealing with the pain.

Some second stage grieving behavior comes with an alarming propensity to cry in rivers. Although some manage to contain public tears and reserve their weeping for bedtime, others weep copiously until friends and family despair of when the crying might finally come to a stop. Some baby boomers find others’ tears embarrassing and hard to witness but in fact the crying process is healing and should not be interfered with unnecessarily, unless the person happens to be suffering from some illness which might be aggravated by constant tears.

The angry second stage of grieving can prolong for many months and sometimes people who are close to the grieving person can become so accustomed to being treated badly, the end of this uncomfortable part of the grieving process goes by unnoticed. It is quite common for grieving baby boomers to lose friends in this prickly stage of grief and people can hardly be blamed for wishing to avoid someone who criticizes and picks fault at every opportunity. If you have patience, however, the sunny and affectionate person you once knew will emerge on the other side of stage two grieving.

The second stage of grieving is deeply emotional and during the moments when the grieving person needs his (or her) friends and family the most, it is often at this stage that they must survive alone, as they might have alienated those closest to them. Angry confrontation is not a scenario most people voluntarily put up with. Baby boomers in the depths of grief might even ask the question: why me? Why couldn’t it happen to you instead? You don’t love your husband (or wife) as much as I loved mine. Why couldn’t it happen to you? It is hurtful and the next hour or the next day, an apology might reasonably be expected but it rarely comes: the person is too deeply involved in their own pain to notice anyone else’s.

 

Friends could certainly not be blamed for turning away from someone who is being so unreasonable. However, at this point it might be a good idea to ask yourself how you would behave if it was you who had suffered the loss and remind yourself that one day it will be your turn to go through the grieving process and your turn to be angry.

The Psychological Article on Anger: Why Me? The Second Stage of Grief is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

 

 

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

 

 

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Baby Boomers Guide to Overcoming the Fear of Living Alone

Saturday, September 19th, 2009

Kubler Ross: Stages of Grief

Kubler Ross: Stages of Grief


Elderly Problems by Boomeryearbook.com

The fear of living alone is something that everyone experiences at some stage. For some, it is a recurring childhood nightmare which begins with grieving at being left too long to cry as a small child and crystallizes later in life when one finally loses one’s life partner or companion. Baby boomers are usually of an age where living alone is something they have had to come to terms with throughout certain changes in their lives.

The worst experience of having to live alone is undoubtedly the transition that is necessary following bereavement. There are many stages in life where single living is something of an excitement: everyone enjoys the freedom of single life and the escape from parental supervision when departing for college, or taking up residence in your first independently owned home! For baby boomers grieving for a deceased partner, however, living alone can be something scary and unpalatable in the extreme.

The solution to conquering the fear of living alone is not to take the all too obvious step of moving in with other people. This can sometimes be a less than successful idea due to the fact that the grieving process can require familiar surroundings, peace and quiet, and the company of familiar friends. All of these elements might be missing from a scenario where someone else’s routine must be considered on a daily basis and someone else’s house rules made priority.

A frequent problem with facing life alone is the shock; especially for those who have actively nursed an ailing life partner through a serious illness prior to death. At these times, the last person you think of is yourself and the problem of living alone can sometimes be cast aside until it is finally on top of you. The process of grief can play cruel games with a person’s ability to be independent at this vulnerable time and someone who might be supposed to be capable and self sufficient might suddenly fall to pieces when faced with the dual effort of grieving and also surviving alone.

For baby boomers with a wide circle of friends, the transition from being in a long term relationship to sudden widowhood can be made easier by gentle socializing and visiting. For those who have always depended solely on their life partner for company, the process is more difficult and might involve having to change social habits to attain a degree of contentment.

The fear of living alone is often a bogey man who disappears once the first unfamiliar way of life is tackled. Taking the step toward buying a new home can sometimes be the answer: for others the prospect of parting with the home they shared with a loved one for so long is hard to bear. Baby boomers who live in a close community are more likely to conquer the fear of living alone than someone who has become habitually socially isolated.

Living alone need not be a drama but the issue must be addressed sympathetically by friends and family to achieve peace of mind for the bereaved.

The Psychological Article on Overcoming the Fear of Living Alone is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Baby Boomers Guide to Grief and Mourning

Saturday, September 19th, 2009

Kubler Ross: Stages of Grieving

Kubler Ross: Stages of Grieving



Elderly Problems By Boomeryearbook.com

There are five distinct stages of grief to go through after losing a long term partner. The five stages include: Denial (it has not happened); Anger (why has this happened to me); Bargaining (if I can have him/her back, I will do this or that…); Depression (the loss sets in along with feelings of despair) and finally Acceptance, which entails not just putting up with grief but embracing the future. These stages apply to everyone who has suffered a loss, including baby boomers.

Denial is the worst part of the process as the bereaved person cannot cope with the death of the person they have loved for so long and continues to love in death as if they are still living. The period of denial can continue for many days, weeks or even months. Denial is often accompanied by the inability to cry and until this sad stage is addressed, the grieving process remains in gridlock.

The second stage is anger at the loss and this stage can set entire families at war as they try to come to terms with their personal loss. When a person dies, the death touches each member of the family and the emotions that run high can result in angry confrontation between a bereaved spouse and the children in the family, or between sisters and brothers. Baby boomers who have suffered a bereavement can be highly emotional and the second angry stage of grieving is particularly explosive and difficult to get through. However, the second stage of the process contributes in some way to allowing a little steam to escape which helps diffuse the situation.

Bargaining, of course, never works. Some baby boomers are practiced traders and the bargaining process that is subconsciously tried during the grieving process is a particularly pointless exercise. Nothing can bring back your dead partner but the pointless bargaining somehow focuses the permanence of death.

Depression can take many forms but usually during bereavement it is typified by staying in bed late, refusing to be drawn into meaningful conversation, refusing to talk about the deceased, not getting dressed during the day, drinking to excess, smoking to excess, being generally listless and unmotivated. The depression stage requires help and support from friends and family and each case is different. Should the depression stage continue for a significant period, professional help should be sought.

Acceptance, although welcome is often itself taken in stages. An acceptance of the death need not necessarily be an acceptance of moving forward and care should be taken at this point to observe the bereaved person from a tactful distance, providing practical help where needed and perhaps putting a few social opportunities in place to encourage new friendships. Baby boomers are usually sociable anyway and at this stage in the grieving process, mourning can take a secondary role to making the effort to move on.

Dying is something we all have to do. Grieving is something we all have to do but care and patience can certainly help us through the worst stages.

The Psychological Article on Grieving and Mourning for Baby Boomers is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

 
Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Elderly Problems: Overcoming Grief and Loss in Later Life

Saturday, September 19th, 2009

Kubler Ross: Stages of Grief

Kubler Ross: Stages of Grief

By Boomeryearbook.com

Grief and loss is hard for anyone. For people who have lived most of their lives with their partner, it is incredibly difficult; for people who re-married late in life and subsequently lost their partner through illness and death, it can seem just as hard as they feel they had too little time with their partner. Widows who are baby boomers and also widowers might require special help to overcome grief and get back on the road to emotionally healthy living as early as possible.

As always, when addressing the problem of grief and loss, time is the key to healing the pain. Baby boomers with a history of affection with a lifelong partner might face a life change that they might not necessarily be prepared for. At these times it is important to recognize and acknowledge that a period of reflection is helpful.

When dealing with grief and loss, friends and family who are close to the bereaved sometimes press for an immediate change of environment to help accelerate the healing process. While suggestions are nearly always made with the bereaved person’s best interests at heart, it is not always beneficial to pull the person away from familiar surroundings and the comfort of warm memories.

Each grieving person is different and reacts differently to loss, in the same way as we all react differently to love, pain, or fear. The best way to approach a grieving friend or relative is probably to try to make a sensible assessment of individual need. For some, this is impossible as they were close to the deceased themselves: grieving daughters and sons are often the last people who can provide practical help in the grieving process as they are themselves grieving.

For baby boomers facing the heartbreak of bereavement and loss, it is often a solitary road to recovery. The grieving process is certainly painful but for some who rush through it, the results can be disastrous and lead to further emotional damage.

Immediately following a death in the family it is always sensible to ‘step back’ from a grieving widow or widower to an extent. That is not to say you should barricade the door and bar all visitors! A little gentle social interaction is a good thing at this time but there are a few social guidelines to follow when visiting a bereaved person:

1. Do not avoid the subject of death. Trying to ignore it will give the impression of reducing its importance.

2. Do not outstay your welcome. Grief requires substantial weeping and the crying process is important. Some baby boomers are uncomfortable with public tears, so remember to call in briefly but try to limit your stay to an hour.

3. Put the grieving person first. If you have problems of your own save them for another time. Keep the conversation gentle and chatty without being too carefree.

4. Do not make insistent invitations to social gatherings. If the person refuses, leave it and ask again the next time. Allow the person to make up their own mind about when they are ready to be sociable again.

The Psychological Article on Overcoming Grief and Loss in Later Life is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

 
Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

 

 

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Sex and the Widow

Saturday, September 19th, 2009

Alleviating Sexual Elderly Problems

Dear Boomer. Is your sex life normal?

By Boomeryearbook.com

Baby boomer men and women who have enjoyed a lengthy marriage and then suddenly lose their partners can enjoy mature relationships with new partners over many years before they finally throw in the sexual towel and hang up the condoms.

Taking your life in your hands can be scary when it comes to dating new people in maturity but it need not be an unpleasant experience. What on earth would be the point of torturing yourself through an agonizing evening of discomfort when the object of the exercise is to enjoy the moment?

For many baby boomer widows in a position to enjoy a sexual relationship with new people, the problem is not one of enthusiasm but of physical embarrassment coupled with the fear of what people might think and say. It is true that many baby boomer widows live in close communities where starting dating again might be viewed with prurient interest by friends and neighbors. However, that does not mean you should stop doing it!

Immediately following bereavement, many widows experience bizarre sexual fantasies that might include sex with the local postman, sex with a close friend or even group sex. These fantasies usually have to do with an assurance of being ‘alive’ rather than a genuine sexual urge and usually these feelings pass and are replaced by an appetite for a more appropriate sexual relationship.

Some widows deliberately seek out younger men for a variety of reasons: younger men are viewed as being less likely to demand a long term commitment and they can provide a greater physical excitement and fulfilment. Other widows are engulfed by memories and find it difficult to move on to a physical relationship with a man who is not their husband; even feeling guilty, as if they are being disloyal or unfaithful in some way to their deceased partner.

Women who decide to return to dating after bereavement sometimes do so under pressure from friends who think she has ‘grieved for long enough’. The grieving process is different for everyone and most baby boomer widows are old enough to decide independently on whether they are ready to start a physical relationship again.

For widows considering a return to a sexual relationship, it is advisable to remember that the rules have changed somewhat over the past thirty years. Always use a condom to protect against sexually transmitted diseases, always let a good friend know where you are and who you are with and let your date know that your friend knows where you are, pay your own bill and for the first few dates, limit your alcohol intake to a glass of wine so you can drive yourself home should you want to leave early.

Try not to involve family early in a relationship to avoid being judged when the relationship ends and a new one begins: nobody likes to think Mom is turning rampant and most children imagine their mothers are exempt from sexual urges, no matter how old she is!

The Psychological Article on Sex and The Widow is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.
Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!
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Baby Boomers living a Tao-centered “sickness free” life

Friday, September 18th, 2009

Baby Boomers Tao guide to alleviating elderly problems

Baby Boomers Tao guide to alleviating elderly problems


By Boomeryearbook.com

The Tao Te Ching is a sacred text containing eighty one verses that were dictated by a self-realized man, Lao Tzu. Lao Tzu lived approximately five hundred years before the birth of Jesus – the Tao Te Ching is the most widely translated body of text after the Bible and its eighty one verses are believed to be the ultimate commentary on living a harmonious life by observing nature – this seems to be exactly what the doctor prescribed for the Seventy-six million baby boomers.

The 71st verse: Knowing ignorance is strength. Ignoring knowledge is sickness. Only when we are sick of our sickness shall we cease to be sick. The sage is not sick but is sick of sickness; this is the secret of health – a Wayne Dyer translation

Lao Tzu is teaching us that sickness simply implies that there is some imbalance in the mind or body. He is telling us that all sickness, mental and physical, stems from not being in tune with the great Tao (or the great Way) – in simpler terms, something about ‘you’ is not in agreement with the ways of nature. Even the slightest presence of a cough, cold, fever or fatigue indicates that there is surely a mental equivalent of that in the form of bad thinking habits - anger, fear, hatred, jealousy or guilt – a movement away from the pure compassion, love, acceptance and patience of the great Tao.

Taoist sages have rightly concluded that fear, hatred, doubt, impatience, greed or any other “ego-based” thoughts always end up creating some ‘dis-ease’ (hyphenated) in the mind or body. Thus, for optimum health, baby boomers will need to weed out such thoughts and to stay centered in the natural well-being of the great Tao by planting seeds of compassion, mercy, patience, well being and empathy. As a great mystic once said, “Don’t think of illness, think of health. Don’t think of thorns, think of flowers. Don’t think of ugliness, misery, think of beauty and joy”.

Practicing the Tao

Contrary to what baby boomers may think, the truth is that it’s never too late to make healthy changes in our lives. Start with cultivating a “happy mind” by refusing to entertain negative thoughts and feelings. Start to perceive a sneeze, an ache, a slight pain or any other form of minor discomfort as the body’s request to allow it to return to its natural healthy state by taking some time off, relaxing or simply going for a walk. A “happy mind” would naturally trust and follow the body’s messages knowing fully well that a body that’s often heard; never falls sick.

Baby Boomers will benefit from taking a good look at their habits, engagements and pursuits from a Tao perspective – ask yourself if these thoughts, habits or pursuits could be a cause of any mental and physical dis-ease (both now and in the future)? If the answer is yes, then simply make it a point that you will not continue to ignore this – after all ignoring knowledge is sickness and knowing ignorance is strength. We baby boomers simply have to take gradual and steady steps everyday towards weeding out negative and impure thoughts/habits/engagements from our lives and planting in seeds of compassion, sharing, peace and empathy.

When Sathya Sai Baba, a God-realized man in India, received multiple fractures to his hipbone; a disciple asked him how he could remain happy and blissful in such an apparent painful physical state. His reply was:

“People today need to learn to give up body attachments and experience their divinity within. Pain is a natural phenomenon. But suffering is a “choice”. I do not suffer, as I am not (just) the body”.

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Baby Boomers Guide to the Toxic Antidote

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Psychological Articles: How to Rid Yourself from Toxic People

Psychological Articles: How to Rid Yourself from Toxic People

Psychological Articles by Boomeryearbook.com

The toxic antidote is sought by the unhappy victims of toxic friendships and relationships all over the World. Psychological articles subject the unhappy condition of toxicity in depth and depressing detail, with all kinds of theories researched and commented upon to find a solution to the unhappiness of toxicity; its causes and the reason it flourishes even within a content and happy environment.

Everyone has gloomy friends; the kind of pal who shows up late without an apology and proceeds to complain about their day before they have even said hello; the ghastly kind of person who tells you how bad you look when you have a cold and then assures you that he or she had far worse symptoms when they had the same cold before passing it on to you! These creatures are the wet blankets on the picnic of life; the gloomy cloud of despondency in an otherwise sunny afternoon. Psychological articles come nowhere near to describing the kind of grey mist such purveyors of depression can cast over a happy disposition.

The antidote to such behavior is actually happiness in large quantities and spread about with as much enthusiasm as possible. Psychological articles go down all kinds of avenues to find the answer to dealing with toxic people and their poisonous attitudes. The subject is somewhat over researched and all manner of complicated formulas are suggested for arming yourself against toxic effects. The simple solution, barely touched upon by professionals in psychological articles, is sunny cheer distributed in the face of negativity and misery.

Those who are affected by the symptoms of toxic negativity described in psychological articles tend to have a healthy resolve which equips them to enjoy pessimism and gloom. They are unhappy people anyway and have a talent for looking on the dark side of a situation and not allowing cheer or laughter to penetrate their cosy, critical outlook. They just don’t want to be drawn into a happier place and will not thank you for trying! Psychological articles which argue whether an antidote for toxicity exists agree that sufferers are happy victims of depression.

So why do we persist in seeking an antidote to toxic gloom and sadness? All the psychological articles that dedicate thousands of words to the pursuit of the antidote to eternal gloom never expound on the advantages of tolerance and patience when dealing with sufferers of the symptoms of toxicity.

Toxic people gravitate to positive attitudes like flies to honey, possibly because this exposure to optimism feeds their critical reserve, giving them one more thing to grumble about. Such people thrive on conflict and objection, so presenting them with a refusal to argue or be drawn into a combative situation dilutes the effect they have on more sociable members of the community.

The Psychological Article on The Toxic Antidote is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Baby Boomers Competing in the Workplace

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Baby Boomers excel in the workplace

Baby Boomers excel in the workplace

 

 


Psychological Articles by Boomeryearbook.com

Psychological articles that are written about age gaps and the problems encountered by members of each age group tend to make their recommendations to the older part of the equation, making the presumption that the younger person will not make an effort to change to improve their relationship with an older person.

Possibly this assessment is correct and the younger generation has no interest in promoting a healthy interaction with the older of the species. Psychological articles seldom address problems of this nature from the youngster’s point of view so it is left to Grandpa to iron out any difficulties and find a common ground.

Older people carry a definite risk of being discarded as non-productive once they reach a certain age. Psychological articles point out, perhaps rather too often, that as the human brain ‘ages’, the ability to take on new concepts becomes limited. Younger generations will stride into new ideas and take on new skills without the slightest difficulty, although perhaps they might not execute them as efficiently. The older generation requires considerably more time to learn something new with any confidence.

In the job market, the older generation have only one advantage and that is experience. The younger model might be adept at modern applications and quick to pick up new policies but the older employee has a wealth of knowledge and years of past experience to call on. Psychological articles that explore the usefulness of older people in the workplace stress that there is no substitute for age when it comes to a steady business head. Many employers, however, are arguably reluctant to consider older applicants due to the risk of frequent absences due to ill health. Yet Psychological articles and research on the statistics of employee absences highlight that more absences occur due to maternity and family commitments than sick days taken by older employees.

The older member of the team tends always to be more reliable and in fact because older employees are expected to take time off, they don’t. It’s the result of being victims of prejudice that makes us super dependable role models. Psychological articles on work related absences emphasize that the older generation takes significantly fewer days as sick leave and is more likely to take on responsibility and be receptive to learning new skills.

When the older generation enters into competition with the younger generation, the results can be surprising. In numerous psychological articles and research that covers aptitude and the application of logic, the older generation take the blue ribbon every time. Why? They have a better grounding in basic skills such as mental arithmetic, which the younger set just cannot cope with after being shackled to a calculator since kindergarten and they are more focused on the job in hand, having fewer distractions such as young children to worry about and a hot social life to maintain.

This Psychological Article on Competing with the Younger Generations is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Setting Boundaries With Your Grandchildren

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Rude grandchildren: setting boundaries

Rude grandchildren: setting boundaries

Elderly Problems by Boomeryearbook.com

Ageing can introduce certain elderly problems that cause difficulties when trying to bridge the age gap, especially when baby boomers or elderly grandparents are living in the same home with several generations.

The problems are obvious. A seventy-year-old who likes to nap in the afternoon is not going to take kindly to being dynamited out of a sound sleep by the latest offering from “Guns and Roses”. Elderly problems begin with small grumblings but can constitute real suffering if ignored and left to escalate in a boisterous atmosphere ill suited to an aging boomer or elderly person.

Elderly people who live with their younger relatives are often labeled as self centred and their elderly problems are often looked upon as attention-seeking nonsense. However, self preservation is often life’s way of protecting us from the kind of stress that might otherwise make us deeply miserable. An elderly relative who recognizes their own difficulties and the way to keep them under control might very well ask that certain boundaries are set, especially with regard to the way younger people behave within earshot.

Such boundaries are often regarded as being unreasonable and even part of a regime of ‘nagging’ but retaining an environment of peace and tranquillity can effectively reduce the effects of elderly problems and encourage harmony with the family unit.

A number of practical considerations should be met when dealing with your children and grandchildren. For example, younger people zoom up and down stairs in seconds but people with elderly problems are not so supple and might also be suffering from poor eyesight or inadequate balance. A few boundaries can make all the difference to going up and down stairs with confidence, such as ensuring that the stairs are always properly lit and that debris is never left where it can cause the person to trip and fall.

The interests and hobbies of the younger generation are usually at variance with those of an aging baby boomer or elderly relative but not necessarily less noisy or intrusive. There is nothing more aggravating than trying to listen to your favourite TV program against a background of Grandpa’s wartime favorites on the piano! Although the tastes and pastimes of the generations might be opposite, there could be a happy middle ground for all, providing everyone is willing to compromise and be considerate.

Elderly problems need not interfere drastically with the generation gap as long as sensible boundaries are set and everyone understands exactly what they are. Don’t be afraid to set those boundaries as they are the cement that holds the generations of the family together, enabling them to live in harmony.

The Psychological Article on How to Set Boundaries with your Children and Grandchildren is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Baby Boomers Guide: How to Survive Dysfunctional Behavior in Children

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers: Dysfunctional Children

Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers: Dysfunctional Children


Psychological Article by Boomeryearbook.com

Baby boomers are getting to that age where patience might be wearing ever so slightly thin when it comes to dealing with dysfunctional behaviour in others and that includes children.

The old favorite, ‘You wouldn’t be allowed to get away with that when I was a kid’ somehow sits uncomfortably on baby boomer shoulders, considering that as kids, baby boomers tended to get away with most things! There are limits, however, to what even the most placid boomer will put up with and obnoxious behaviour in children is probably one of them.

Children usually misbehave for a reason and that reason is usually to be found somewhere within the parenting skills of the primary adult. Baby boomers are smart and intuitive and although sometimes unable to find the solution, they can usually spot the problem from miles off! If the child you are dealing with happens to be a grandchild, there is a hurdle to get over from the outset, as Mom is very likely to object to your taking Junior’s table manners into your own hands so you will have to try making small improvements at first.

Baby boomers are by nature fun to be with (older boomers will no doubt remember the sixties!) There is no need to yell at a kid who is obviously unhappy to begin with. Exercise a little baby boomer intelligence and seek a gentler plan of action. Children can behave like the devil incarnate in situations where you might feel embarrassed by public displays of tantrum but there is no substitute for calm at these times.

Screaming tempers are very difficult to sustain in the face of absolute calm and a stony determination not to respond angrily. Take a deep breath and you’ll find yourself able to communicate affectionately with the child, ignoring your private desire to scream even louder than they. If you still can, kneel beside the child so that your face is on a level with theirs; there is nothing scarier than having a large adult towering over you when you are trying to have your best public screaming fit.

Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers: Temper Tantrums in Children

Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers: Temper Tantrums in Children

When the child understands that you are not going to shout and scream and in fact, join in with the hysteria game, it is likely in most cases that calm will be restored. This is not the time to begin extracting apologies; just walk away and address the cause of the problem thirty minutes later, perhaps. By that time the child will have recovered some measure of quiet and be easier to approach.

Baby boomers are the older generation nowadays but there is no need to behave like an elderly despot: a calmer attitude is more productive.

The Psychological Article on The Baby Boomers Guide to How to Survive Dysfunctional Behaviour in Children
is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological coaching articles and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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