Archive for the ‘Psychological Articles’ Category

How to quit being a compulsive shopper

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

Psychological Articles by BoomerYearbook.com

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems: Compulsive Shopping

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems: Compulsive Shopping

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems

By Boomeryearbook.com

If you have a ‘shop till you drop’ attitude then you definitely need advice, as the compulsive shopping obsession is one of the major elderly problems and might easily land you in hard to resolve long term financial troubles. Psychological articles tell us that shopping addictions are quite common in modern times as many of us struggle to fight anxiety and stress by collecting beautiful, but unnecessary, new things that once bought, might never be used.

Psychological articles tell us that the number of female victims of this elderly problem is higher than males, as women indulge in this deceptively harmless activity to fight off loneliness, dissatisfaction with present life, stress, anxiety and depression. But to put it very honestly, compulsive shopping is not the solution to any of these elderly problems as it worsens psychological states by adding to debts and expenses; especially for “out of control” habitual credit card users.

However, if compulsive shopping is one of your elderly problems, take heart, as psychological articles tell us that with motivation and determination it is quite possible to rid yourself of this elderly problem. Just like any other addiction – such as alcoholism or gambling -the obvious solutions to compulsive shopping might appear difficult to act upon initially but with proper help and resolve, they are effectively combated in the long run.

Compulsive shopping elderly problems can be prevented if you find a reasonably strong diversion, something that would effectively keep you busy enough to stop you from thinking about spending money on not-needed stuff. For instance, try indulging yourself in a hobby or connecting with a card or book group to relieve stress, loneliness, or anxiety, or sign up for an interesting class that will challenge your mind, boost self esteem, and deter you from mindlessly grazing shopping malls.

Another idea to help limit unnecessary purchases it to create a reasonable shopping list of required items to help keep you focused and prevent purchasing unneeded, less useful items. It will keep you on track without making you spend more than you should. Additionally, paying by cash or check, and not using a credit card, is an effective strategy to help reduce the compulsive shopping urge.

One very important warning to help curtail the elderly problem of compulsive shopping is to avoid watching advertisements, TV shopping channels, and discount warehouse ads as they are too tempting for excessive shoppers. Also, a great idea is to leave your wallet at home while you go out for a nice walk, thus reducing the impulse to purchase and limiting your stroll to window shopping only. Another tip to help deal with this elderly problem is to avoid shopping or visiting shopping malls while you are visiting friends, as psychological articles warn us that usually people spend more money when shopping outside their home community.

It is important for all those with the elderly problems of compulsive shopping to sort out the causes behind their compulsive shopping addiction, as knowledge is power and the first step in controlling this behavior. Moreover, one has to make a conscious decision to control shopping urges in order to find a positive solution to this problem.

If you feel that your shopping compulsion has spiraled out of control, please consult a professional therapist or counselor. Psychological articles tell us that NPL or Neuro-Linguistic Programming is an effective treatment as it tackles the problem from the grass root level, that is, the mind, and that hypnotherapy or self-hypnosis can also be very helpful in stopping the elderly problem of compulsive shopping.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Re-living the Nightmare: Flashbacks and Why They Occur in Older Age

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

Post Traumatic Combat Flashbacks

Post Traumatic Combat Flashbacks

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems by Boomeryearbook.com

Life events that occur can include happy experiences but also things we would all rather forget. Being part of or even witnessing a traumatic event can affect us throughout our lives, recurring to haunt us when we are at our most vulnerable. Baby boomers who are old enough to have war experiences, for instance, might find they are distressed by flashbacks in older age, despite being trouble free for decades.

Some aging baby boomers find that upsetting events that occurred in childhood, such as the death of a parent, returns with vivid imagery in later life. Some of the events that scar human beings might be the death of a beloved pet or an act of cruelty. A child’s phobia can have a long reaching and permanent effect causing elderly problems in later life, despite being kept at arm’s length throughout many years immediately following the event that caused the problem.

There are many psychological disorders that could be the result of serious emotional damage in early life or a traumatic event that has not been properly addressed. Flashbacks are often the warning signs that all is not well. Sometimes they are simply the result of feeling vulnerable following the death of a friend or partner; occasionally, the cause is more serious and will require professional counseling to overcome the problem.

Flashbacks might take the form of fleeting images, seemingly unconnected with the task at hand. Alternatively, they may recur only when the sufferer is indulging in a particular and perhaps mundane activity, such as sweeping leaves or washing the car. The study of psychological connections made by the mind is a precise science and one that is rarely achieved with any success by unqualified parties, however interested and well meaning they might be.

Flashbacks might take the form of quite pleasing and apparently harmless memories or they might be a nightmarish and lengthy experience not easily put aside or dismissed as daydreams. During early adulthood, when the pressure of a busy family and working life exhausts on a daily basis, flashbacks might occur rarely if at all. As baby boomers progress into retirement, however, the incidence of bereavement and emotional upheaval might be more intrusive and lead to flashbacks becoming more intense; less manageable. Increased spare time might also allow for deeper introspection and result in flashbacks increasing in frequency.

Behind most flashback experiences, there is a psychological reaction to a previous experience lurking. For many people, flashbacks continue until the day they die and are accepted as part of life’s strange tapestry. Others find flashback incidents too disturbing to ignore and eventually seek professional psychological help to deal with them.

Recurrent Nightmare of Trauma

Recurrent Nightmare of Trauma

Aging baby boomers experiences of flashbacks and their subsequent journey to eradicate them can be both enriching and enlightening, providing care is taken to consult with a qualified practitioner in psychology. Many psychological articles have documented that Somatic Experiencing Therapy or Cognitive Behavioral therapy can alleviate this elderly problem and is oftentimes a feature of a treatment program when dealing with flashbacks.

The Psychological Article on Re-living the Nightmare: Flashbacks and Why They Occur in Older Age is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Baby Boomers guide to dissolving the fear of death: How Taoism can help alleviate this elderly problem

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

Overcoming Fear of Death through the Tao of Letting Go

Overcoming Fear of Death through the Tao of Letting Go



By Boomeryearbook.com

The Tao Te Ching is a sacred text containing eighty one verses that were dictated by a self-realized man, Lao Tzu. Lao Tzu lived approximately five hundred years before the birth of Jesus – the Tao Te Ching is the most widely translated body of text after the Bible and its eighty one verses are believed to be the ultimate commentary on living a harmonious life by observing nature – this seems to be exactly what the doctor prescribed for the Seventy-six million baby boomers .

The 74th verse: If you realize that all things change, there is nothing you will try to hold on to. If you aren’t afraid of dying, there is nothing you can’t achieve. Trying to control the future is like trying to take the master carpenter’s place. When you handle the master carpenter’s tools, chances are that you’ll cut your hand.

Now that more are more of us baby boomers are beginning to and retire and grow older, we find ourselves thinking about death more than we used to. Death seems to be one of the biggest questions that life has to offer. According to Lao Tzu, death is where time, space and everything materialistic ceases to hold any meaning. What dies is our outer identity leaving behind the nameless, formless and indestructible essence of who we really are. Lao Tzu advises us to re-connect and operate from that nameless and formless place that lies beneath the layers of personality and identity. Once we identify with that part of ourselves, the fear of death will automatically dissolve.

Baby boomers will find the 74th verse of the Tao Te Ching interesting as it urges us to cease looking for permanence and security in our external lives. The very nature of physical life is that of constant change – accepting that as a fact brings harmony and peace – holding on to something or someone external for safety and security breeds fear, insecurity, doubt, greed and possessiveness. This is as true for the body as it’s true for everything else that we own.

The Tao teaches us that our very essence is part of an infinite and inexhaustible source – although it’s not physical, the physical world is born and renewed from it. That source is unchanging – even though our “ever-changing” physical world came from it. According to Lao Tzu, that source is the only true permanent reality there is – even though the illusionary physical world came from it.

Meditation for baby boomers to overcome the fear of death: While still alive, practice dying. During meditation simply allow your awareness to move beyond the physical body and the physical world for a few minutes. Contemplate and find comfort in leaving behind and being without the physical shell and all its trappings. Become an observer of how you tend to get caught up in the world of “ten thousand things”. Becoming a silent and compassionate observer of your physical life is the key in dissolving the fear of death and reconnecting with the infinite and everlasting Self (capital S).

Here is an excerpt from the book Communion with God by Neale Donald Walsch that sums up this thought beautifully:

Which snowflake is the most magnificent? Is it possible that they are all magnificent – and that, celebrating their magnificence together they create an awesome display? Then they melt into each other, and into the Oneness. Yet they never go away. They never disappear. They never cease to be. Simply they change form. And not just once, but several times: from solid to liquid, from liquid to vapor, from the seen to the unseen, to rise again, and then again to return in new displays of breathtaking beauty and wonder. This is life, nourishing life.

Baby Boomers Understanding the Tao – bending is living is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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A few thoughts for Boomers on dealing with death (and life)

Saturday, September 26th, 2009

 

byb-death-danger-dreamstime_85916651

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems

by Boomeryearbook.com

A great mystic once said, “A man who is afraid of death will be afraid of life also, because life brings death. If you are afraid of the enemy and you close your door, the friend will also be prohibited.”

Baby boomers are plagued with a number of fears – fear of isolation, fear of not having enough money, fear of change, fear of old age and the fear of losing the lime light are just to name a few. But the root of all these fears is definitely the fear of death. All other fears seem to be just by-products of the fear of death.

The basic idea here is that even though we boomers intellectually know that we are going to die someday; very few of us truly believe it. The reason I say that is because, had we truly believed it; we would be living life very differently.

The bitter truth is that we live a sleepwalker’s existence by doing things automatically without thinking about whether it’s really essential or not – we do things and say things in certain ways just because its how we have always done it. Thinking about death breaks the shackles of this sleepwalker’s existence and forces us to think of the essentials.

The Buddhists recommend imagining a little bird on your shoulder that asks the question, “Is today the day? Am I ready and doing all that I need to do by being the person I ought to be today?” this little practice will not only eliminate the fear of death, but it will also eliminate the fear of life – somehow remembering death tends to cleanse our life by reminding us of what’s really important and freeing us from all that’s not important.

Understanding death is essential in understanding life. Embracing death equals embracing life. Leaning to die equals learning to live. This thought is summed up beautifully by the Lebanese poet, Khalil Gibran,

“You would know the secret of death. But how shall you find it unless you seek it in the heart of life? The owl whose night-bound eyes are blind unto the day cannot unveil the mystery of light. If you would indeed behold the spirit of death, open your heart wide unto the body of life. For life and death are one, even as the river and the sea are one.”

It is futile for boomers to try to trick themselves into believing that we are not going to grow old and die. Wanting to be young again simply means that one is not in awe of the wisdom that comes with being old. Instead of wanting to be young again, isn’t it a better idea to relish in the wisdom that comes with old age. After all growing old isn’t simply about white hair and wrinkly skin; it’s about a mental, emotional and spiritual transcendence of everything that’s not important – it’s about moving away from the fear of death to an understanding of life and death; and then to live a better life based on that understanding.

Positive Psychology Map

Positive Psychology Map

Remeber to practice Positive Psychology and ask yourself “Is today the day, little bird… is it today?”

The Psychological Article on A few thoughts for Boomers on dealing with death (and life) is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Baby Boomers Guide to the Toxic Antidote

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Psychological Articles: How to Rid Yourself from Toxic People

Psychological Articles: How to Rid Yourself from Toxic People

Psychological Articles by Boomeryearbook.com

The toxic antidote is sought by the unhappy victims of toxic friendships and relationships all over the World. Psychological articles subject the unhappy condition of toxicity in depth and depressing detail, with all kinds of theories researched and commented upon to find a solution to the unhappiness of toxicity; its causes and the reason it flourishes even within a content and happy environment.

Everyone has gloomy friends; the kind of pal who shows up late without an apology and proceeds to complain about their day before they have even said hello; the ghastly kind of person who tells you how bad you look when you have a cold and then assures you that he or she had far worse symptoms when they had the same cold before passing it on to you! These creatures are the wet blankets on the picnic of life; the gloomy cloud of despondency in an otherwise sunny afternoon. Psychological articles come nowhere near to describing the kind of grey mist such purveyors of depression can cast over a happy disposition.

The antidote to such behavior is actually happiness in large quantities and spread about with as much enthusiasm as possible. Psychological articles go down all kinds of avenues to find the answer to dealing with toxic people and their poisonous attitudes. The subject is somewhat over researched and all manner of complicated formulas are suggested for arming yourself against toxic effects. The simple solution, barely touched upon by professionals in psychological articles, is sunny cheer distributed in the face of negativity and misery.

Those who are affected by the symptoms of toxic negativity described in psychological articles tend to have a healthy resolve which equips them to enjoy pessimism and gloom. They are unhappy people anyway and have a talent for looking on the dark side of a situation and not allowing cheer or laughter to penetrate their cosy, critical outlook. They just don’t want to be drawn into a happier place and will not thank you for trying! Psychological articles which argue whether an antidote for toxicity exists agree that sufferers are happy victims of depression.

So why do we persist in seeking an antidote to toxic gloom and sadness? All the psychological articles that dedicate thousands of words to the pursuit of the antidote to eternal gloom never expound on the advantages of tolerance and patience when dealing with sufferers of the symptoms of toxicity.

Toxic people gravitate to positive attitudes like flies to honey, possibly because this exposure to optimism feeds their critical reserve, giving them one more thing to grumble about. Such people thrive on conflict and objection, so presenting them with a refusal to argue or be drawn into a combative situation dilutes the effect they have on more sociable members of the community.

The Psychological Article on The Toxic Antidote is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Sexuality for Baby Boomers

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Boomers: Not too old for sex

Boomers: Not too old for sex

By Boomeryearbook.com

The acknowledgement that sexual activity takes place between members of the baby boomer generation usually draws comments like, “Ew, gross…” or “Must we have this discussion…?” from younger friends and members of the family.

Well, get over it kids because guess what…? Baby boomers enjoy a sexual relationship as much as and sometimes a whole lot more than anyone else. And coming from a generation of sexual rebels, many of them are a lot better at it than some of their younger successors in the bedroom department.

The late fifties and sixties saw the sexual revolution that produced rock and roll and free love. The baby boomers who were around seventeen or eighteen when Woodstock shook the world are now in their late eighties and probably still rocking a trailer somewhere as we speak!

Sexual freedom is not something a person grows out of. Someone who enjoyed a liberated and active sex life in their early twenties is probably not going to have changed his or her habits much to comply with someone else’s idea of how elderly ladies and gentlemen should conduct themselves.

Baby boomers have an ingrained ability to do the exact thing they want to do at the exact moment they choose to do it and sometimes sexual activity between older partners is remarkably frequent considering that many of their physical capabilities have been compromised by aching joints and worn out muscles.

Occasionally, however, people who have spent the best part of thirty or forty years with a long term companion or spouse suddenly find themselves alone and exploring the possibilities of finding another sexual partner, not only to gratify physical needs but also to provide social activity and companionship. Women tend to find the transition from long term wife, mother and grandmother to prospective girlfriend significantly easier than baby boomer men who have been widowed or recently divorced. Considering that women mature earlier than men and display a greater resilience to grief, this is hardly surprising.

Aging boomers living within a family structure sometimes find their re-emergence into a new social life. If your grandmother or grandfather is trying to find someone to spend time with, a little understanding would not go amiss. Older people can find a new social life tiring and more than a little embarrassing when it must be played out before an audience of interested family members, giggling behind closed doors at the prospect of Grandpa getting his jollies with the widow around the corner.

Try to remember that to Grandpa, this is an important and serious matter. It is important to Grandpa that he does not humiliate himself before junior members of the family and that he retains his dignity. You might also remember that one day it will be your turn to remodel your life in older age and you might need a little love and understanding too.

Sexuality in middle and older age carries a freedom not experienced by younger members of society. As teenagers, the agonies of sexual experimentation impede enjoyment and later, producing children necessarily restricts access to sexual liberation. The aging baby boomer can enjoy greater sexual relaxation and possible greater pleasure as a result. Now there’s something to think about…

The Psychological Article on Sexuality for Baby Boomers is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Losing Your Looks – How to Cope with Wrinkles

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

the wrinkles of time

the wrinkles of time



By Boomeryearbook.com

Hopefully, everybody gets older. As you lurch into your twilight years and notice your ankles are swollen, your joints hurt and you can pinch more than an inch from your waist, the choice is either to face up to the problems you will be experiencing as an aging baby boomer or lie down and die right now and forego living the next twenty (if you’re lucky) or so years.

Well obviously very few (unless they are exceptionally depressed) will choose the latter option. Everybody mourns the loss of youth to a degree, although very few would choose to live their early years over again. Imagine all those late nights walking the floor with the baby; all those agonizing first dates to go through again; going to the dentist again! Aargh! Baby boomers have a comfortable outlook on life most of the time and view their situation with a pragmatic attitude. Sometimes, though, it’s nice to dream about the days when we all had hourglass figures and perfect skin and a fantastic row of white, even teeth.

‘Looks aren’t everything’, we are told, usually by people who are still thirty six and gorgeous. Baby boomers are now in the stages of middle age or older age and experiencing the aches and pains that so often accompany advancing years. The days when they could ride a bicycle down to the store or dance till dawn are fewer and fewer and they find themselves facing a life that is less active and filled with a number of annoyances, not the least of which is fading looks.

That being said, fading looks need not necessarily constitute a bad thing. Women certainly lose the sheen on the hair as it turns to grey but there are some extremely elegant aging boomers or elderly ladies out there, some of whom knock socks off younger models for chic. Women can cruise into their nineties and still display a sharp interest in clothes, cosmetics and the latest beauty treatments and baby boomers show every sign of following the traditions of such women through the generations.

Men are a little less concerned with their looks but it seems to be a question of those that are, really are and those that are not, could not care less. The occasional hair transplant will cause a ripple in the local golf club but the same guy might wear his sandal with black socks and not care what anyone else thinks if he is comfortable!

There is something to be said for growing old gracefully and allowing small changes to take part in your life rather than overturn it. Lower heels are a comfortable transition for tired legs: we remember the joy of stilettos but that doesn’t mean we would buy another pair!

Whether baby boomers are the type to allow their lives to be capsized by the prospect of losing their looks or not, they have to deal with it somehow or resort to surgical intervention to keep the wolves of time from baying at the door.

The Psychological Article on Losing Your Looks – How to Cope with Wrinkles is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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The Realms of Narcissistic Fantasy

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Narcissistic Fantasy

Narcissistic Fantasy

Psychological Articles by Boomeryearbook.com

As we get older, and baby boomers are certainly doing that, we tend to experience regret for the things we always wanted to and never did; the places we wanted to travel to yet never saw; the people we always wanted to meet but never met.

Some baby boomers reaching an age where they spend more time looking back than forward indulge in a dangerous fantasy where they pretend to have seen things they never saw and to have met people they never met. We all know and love these sometimes less than loveable characters, who claim to have done all kinds of things that are impossible.

Usually, such fantasies are harmless and come under the heading of ‘Shaggy Dog Stories’ – on a par with the fisherman’s tales of ‘The One That Got Away.’ Sometimes, however, the fantasy becomes too credible, too close to the truth and overlaps with reality. When the dreamer is exposed, he becomes angry and overwrought because he really believes his fantasy to be real.

Such fantasies begin to become a nuisance in certain situations. When people start to believe themselves attractive to others, when in fact they are merely passing acquaintances, the resulting behavior can be intrusive and unwelcome. Baby boomers tend to be advancing in age and are sometimes ill equipped to deal with unwelcome attentions.

The trick is to know when a fantasy world is something of a mild indulgence and when it is escalating out of all proportion to reality. Baby boomers tend to socialize quite actively with other members of their generation so have the opportunity to be exposed to harmless ‘bull’ and also to the more harmful dreamed up scenarios that are embarrassing and only lead to further tall stories, especially if they involve the reputations of other people.

Just about everyone has heard silly older men expounding about their conquests in their younger days, stretching the truth about how many girlfriends they had and how if they were thirty years younger…and so on. Such stories can cause deep emotional harm when they are expanded to include fantasy behavior, indulged in with a real lady that everybody knows would never dream of acting in such a fashion.

On these occasions, a dilemma has to be faced. Often, the dreamer does not intend to bully or hurt anyone and sees himself (or herself) as a real contender with control over the listener; someone who can put a stop to the fantasy whenever he chooses. Unfortunately, a great deal of damage can be done before such people are finally dealt with.

Baby boomers in general are grounded characters with a firm grip on reality but there are always exceptions to the rule. The best way to deal with people caught in a fantasy world is to gently remove interest from their conversation and walk away. No confrontation is necessary. The disappearance of an audience soon fixes the problem and underlines to the dreamer that his fantasies are unwelcome in polite company.

The Psychological Article on The Realms of Narcissistic Fantasy is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Cosmetic Surgery for Baby Boomers

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Should Boomers Go Under the Knife?

Should Boomers Go Under the Knife?


By Boomeryearbook.com

Cosmetic enhancements have come a long way in recent decades and in certain parts of the World, cosmetic intervention is a way of life entered into along with getting glasses or buying a hearing aid. Those who seek the delights of face lifting, breast tightening and tummy tucks are traditionally facing the aging process. Baby boomers tend to join the ranks of the cosmetically enhanced as they approach late middle age.

The temptation to consign flab and flap to the knife is considerable. The main attraction is, of course, the ‘quick fix’ aspect of the arrangement. Baby boomers who have spent a full and enjoyable life are probably wearing the evidence of years of indulgence on their faces and bodies. Some accept the badges of age with pride and a sense of humor but others, perhaps those a little more sensitive and mindful of appearances, opt for enhancement.

Dieting and exercise can get rid of the traces of imperfection but can take a very long time to achieve a lasting effect and perhaps not even then. A quick visit to a reputable plastic surgeon can produce another ten years shelf life, providing the process has been approached sensibly and with realistic targets.

Before approaching cosmetic surgery as an option, however, it is practical to first take an assessment of general health and ask yourself whether you are fit enough to undergo what is principally an unnecessary surgical procedure. Baby boomersresorting to cosmetic surgery are often doing so because they cannot be bothered to make changes naturally.

There are a number of non-aggressive options open to those who are determined to achieve cosmetic enhancement. Botox can be trialed without lasting effects and certainly spa treatments can produce dramatic results over time and include an enormous range of cosmetic preparations to limit the appearance of age. A word of warning though: when considering spray tanning, bear in mind that wrinkles will collect extra tanning solution and you could end up looking worse instead of better.

Before approaching a cosmetic surgeon, do take all the precautions possible to ensure that you consult a reputable surgeon attached to a properly registered clinic with every possible appropriate certification. Some clinics specialize in treating baby boomers and booming seniors and will carry impressive testimonials, so make sure you read them and make careful enquiries.

There is no need to be secretive about making inquiries to have surgery. Even if you do manage to keep your intentions under wraps, the evidence of your operation will become all too apparent – otherwise there is little point in doing it, right?

Finally, approach your surgery with the attitude that you are not younger as a result of cosmetic enhancement but just improved around the edges. There is little point in taking a step that completely alters your appearance but has a detrimental effect on your emotions. Accept that the changes are cosmetic and nothing can remove the years you have lived. Why would anyone want to? Baby boomers tend to have pragmatic outlook and adapt well to circumstances. Cosmetic surgery need not be an exception to this rule.

The Psychological Article on Cosmetic Surgery for Baby Boomers is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Baby Boomers Competing in the Workplace

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Baby Boomers excel in the workplace

Baby Boomers excel in the workplace

 

 


Psychological Articles by Boomeryearbook.com

Psychological articles that are written about age gaps and the problems encountered by members of each age group tend to make their recommendations to the older part of the equation, making the presumption that the younger person will not make an effort to change to improve their relationship with an older person.

Possibly this assessment is correct and the younger generation has no interest in promoting a healthy interaction with the older of the species. Psychological articles seldom address problems of this nature from the youngster’s point of view so it is left to Grandpa to iron out any difficulties and find a common ground.

Older people carry a definite risk of being discarded as non-productive once they reach a certain age. Psychological articles point out, perhaps rather too often, that as the human brain ‘ages’, the ability to take on new concepts becomes limited. Younger generations will stride into new ideas and take on new skills without the slightest difficulty, although perhaps they might not execute them as efficiently. The older generation requires considerably more time to learn something new with any confidence.

In the job market, the older generation have only one advantage and that is experience. The younger model might be adept at modern applications and quick to pick up new policies but the older employee has a wealth of knowledge and years of past experience to call on. Psychological articles that explore the usefulness of older people in the workplace stress that there is no substitute for age when it comes to a steady business head. Many employers, however, are arguably reluctant to consider older applicants due to the risk of frequent absences due to ill health. Yet Psychological articles and research on the statistics of employee absences highlight that more absences occur due to maternity and family commitments than sick days taken by older employees.

The older member of the team tends always to be more reliable and in fact because older employees are expected to take time off, they don’t. It’s the result of being victims of prejudice that makes us super dependable role models. Psychological articles on work related absences emphasize that the older generation takes significantly fewer days as sick leave and is more likely to take on responsibility and be receptive to learning new skills.

When the older generation enters into competition with the younger generation, the results can be surprising. In numerous psychological articles and research that covers aptitude and the application of logic, the older generation take the blue ribbon every time. Why? They have a better grounding in basic skills such as mental arithmetic, which the younger set just cannot cope with after being shackled to a calculator since kindergarten and they are more focused on the job in hand, having fewer distractions such as young children to worry about and a hot social life to maintain.

This Psychological Article on Competing with the Younger Generations is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

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