Archive for the ‘Medical and Mental Health’ Category

Smoking and the Baby Boomer. Why Stop Now When the Damage is Done?

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

It's never too late for boomer to stop smoking

It's never too late for boomer to stop smoking

By Boomeryearbook.com

Smoking is a sensitive subject for smokers who have tried to give up cigarettes and failed many times. Nobody likes to admit they cannot do something and an admission to being unable to give up smoking is no different to any other human reaction to failure. Baby boomers who are veteran smokers over many years might have tried and failed on several occasions to bin the cigarettes but annoyingly end up ‘back on the cancer sticks’.

People who have never smoked struggle to understand where the attraction is in filling your airways and mouth with evil smelling smoke and then drawing it into your lungs where it can do further damage and deposit lethal tar. The fact is: when many baby boomers began smoking, it was not only acceptable to smoke; it was actually quite ‘cool’ and fashionable. Women actually took lessons on how to smoke sexily! Movie stars who smoked and could look through the smoke into the camera lens with a smouldering, sexy expression were idolized and admired, such as Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. Any woman who lights a cigarette nowadays is greeted with “Ew, must you do that in here…?”

"Glamourous" Young Boomer Woman

"Glamourous" Young Boomer Woman

In the baby boomer years, smoking was sociable and sophisticated. No cocktail party would be complete without the requisite pile of cigarettes on offer, probably presented in a novelty holder, and every coffee table in the room would be groaning under the weight of overflowing ashtrays and onyx table lighters. Now, however, polite guests go outside to smoke, in all weather…! Today, hospitality is considered to ‘not count’ where smokers are concerned.

As smokers get older, they convince themselves, incredibly, that if they are going to get cancer they will already have it so why bother giving up now? This is the addict talking, of course, and no matter what age you are when you give up the result will certainly be to improve health and prolong life. From the moment that cigarettes are cut out, health and general well being begin to recover.

For smoking addicts, giving up cigarettes means a change in lifestyle. For people who have never smoked, it is difficult to see why a smoker cannot relax on the telephone or enjoy a cup of coffee without a cigarette in their hand. Suddenly it is necessary to find something else to do with the hand that once held a cigarette. And it is quite common for a sugar addiction to follow a smoking addiction, as the addict turns to another vice for comfort.

Giving up cigarettes is a plus for everyone, including baby boomers. For seasoned smokers who have smoked for thirty or forty years, it is hard to break away from cigarettes but there are help groups everywhere, as well as clinics to provide acupuncture, hypnosis and psychotherapy to help kick the habit. One of them is sure to hold the key to smoke free lungs for the boomer in your life!

The Psychological Article on Smoking and the Baby Boomer. Why Stop Now When the Damage is Done? is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Baby Boomers guide to dissolving the fear of death: How Taoism can help alleviate this elderly problem

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

Overcoming Fear of Death through the Tao of Letting Go

Overcoming Fear of Death through the Tao of Letting Go



By Boomeryearbook.com

The Tao Te Ching is a sacred text containing eighty one verses that were dictated by a self-realized man, Lao Tzu. Lao Tzu lived approximately five hundred years before the birth of Jesus – the Tao Te Ching is the most widely translated body of text after the Bible and its eighty one verses are believed to be the ultimate commentary on living a harmonious life by observing nature – this seems to be exactly what the doctor prescribed for the Seventy-six million baby boomers .

The 74th verse: If you realize that all things change, there is nothing you will try to hold on to. If you aren’t afraid of dying, there is nothing you can’t achieve. Trying to control the future is like trying to take the master carpenter’s place. When you handle the master carpenter’s tools, chances are that you’ll cut your hand.

Now that more are more of us baby boomers are beginning to and retire and grow older, we find ourselves thinking about death more than we used to. Death seems to be one of the biggest questions that life has to offer. According to Lao Tzu, death is where time, space and everything materialistic ceases to hold any meaning. What dies is our outer identity leaving behind the nameless, formless and indestructible essence of who we really are. Lao Tzu advises us to re-connect and operate from that nameless and formless place that lies beneath the layers of personality and identity. Once we identify with that part of ourselves, the fear of death will automatically dissolve.

Baby boomers will find the 74th verse of the Tao Te Ching interesting as it urges us to cease looking for permanence and security in our external lives. The very nature of physical life is that of constant change – accepting that as a fact brings harmony and peace – holding on to something or someone external for safety and security breeds fear, insecurity, doubt, greed and possessiveness. This is as true for the body as it’s true for everything else that we own.

The Tao teaches us that our very essence is part of an infinite and inexhaustible source – although it’s not physical, the physical world is born and renewed from it. That source is unchanging – even though our “ever-changing” physical world came from it. According to Lao Tzu, that source is the only true permanent reality there is – even though the illusionary physical world came from it.

Meditation for baby boomers to overcome the fear of death: While still alive, practice dying. During meditation simply allow your awareness to move beyond the physical body and the physical world for a few minutes. Contemplate and find comfort in leaving behind and being without the physical shell and all its trappings. Become an observer of how you tend to get caught up in the world of “ten thousand things”. Becoming a silent and compassionate observer of your physical life is the key in dissolving the fear of death and reconnecting with the infinite and everlasting Self (capital S).

Here is an excerpt from the book Communion with God by Neale Donald Walsch that sums up this thought beautifully:

Which snowflake is the most magnificent? Is it possible that they are all magnificent – and that, celebrating their magnificence together they create an awesome display? Then they melt into each other, and into the Oneness. Yet they never go away. They never disappear. They never cease to be. Simply they change form. And not just once, but several times: from solid to liquid, from liquid to vapor, from the seen to the unseen, to rise again, and then again to return in new displays of breathtaking beauty and wonder. This is life, nourishing life.

Baby Boomers Understanding the Tao – bending is living is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Friday, October 16th, 2009

Psychological Artices: Obsessive Compulsive Chart

Psychological Articles: Obsessive Compulsive Chart

Psychological Articles by Boomeryearbook.com

We often hear the term obsessive compulsive bandied about to describe a variety of behaviors and often it is used jokingly to emphasize a person’s devotion to some sport, cause or activity. However, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder or OCD is a very real and painful disease. In this psychological article we will discuss the symptoms and cures for OCD.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is an Anxiety Disorder (DSM-IV) that is characterized by irrational fears. Victims develop anxious thoughts and feelings based on a foreboding or dread that some horrible thing will happen to them. Psychological articles agree that these fears are largely unfounded and exist only in the mind of the victim.

In order to deal with these irrational fears, a victim develops compulsive behavior patterns such as:

• Repeated hand washing
• Counting things
• Double checking things
• Insisting that things be in a particular order or symmetry

Psychological articles concur that even smaller, less significant behaviors such as insisting that all your canned goods face the same direction can be classified as compulsive behavior.

Many Baby Boomers enjoy the television program, “Monk” which first made OCD known among the masses. Up until the success of this TV show, many people did not know about Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. In Monk’s case, all of his friends and family are aware of his obsession. In real life though, this is not usually true.

Most psychological articles say that those who suffer from OCD will go to great lengths to hide their compulsive behavior. They don’t want to be seen as freakish or weird so they are often secretive only performing their “rituals” in private where no one can see.

How Did I Get OCD?

Some psychological articles believe that OCD is hereditary and passed on through maternal genes. If you noticed Obsessive Compulsive behaviors in your own mother or other female relative then there’s a chance that you can develop these irrational fears and obsessive behavior patterns during your lifetime.

Other studies have found that OCD occurs when insufficient amounts of the brain chemical Serotonin are produced. Still other studies in psychological articles say that this disease comes as a result of changes in your body’s chemistry and biology. There’s no definitive answer as to what actually causes OCD.

What Can You Do If You Think You May Have OCD?

The problem with OCD is that its sufferers will normally hide their symptoms from others. This makes it difficult for the victims to receive the help they need to live normal, healthy lives. Victims often downplay their obsessive behavior by referring to it as “perfectionism.” There’s no stigma attached to being a perfectionist. This is seen by most psychological articles as normal behavior requiring no medication or counseling.

But there’s a line between perfectionism and Obsessive Compulsive behavior. With OCD there is a great amount of fear and anxiety coupled with irrational thoughts that the victim cannot control. In some cases, sufferers can even display violent tendencies such as:

• Urges to harm yourself or someone else
• Aggressive and horrific impulses
• Extreme pornographic or sexual images constantly bombarding your thoughts

Because some of the behaviors can be harmful to sufferers or those around them, it is critical to obtain treatment. If you suspect that you or a loved one is a victim of OCD, then realize that your ARE a victim of a very real disease and you need help.

Baby Boomers are very independent thinkers. They are rugged individuals who have made it through a lifetime of struggles and have triumphed. They like to think of themselves as tough people. This can often cause them NOT to seek help for things like OCD.

Imagine having Cancer. Someone with cancer would not be ashamed to admit it and get treatment. OCD is no different. It, too, is a disease that has invaded your mind and body and you should not be ashamed to seek treatment for it.

There are many good medications nowadays that can greatly reduce the signs and symptoms of OCD. Counseling can also be beneficial. Psychological articles tell us that with the proper treatment, the signs and symptoms of OCD can be dramatically reduced to the point where you can live a normal, healthy life.

One of the more successful treatments recommended by psychological articles is cognitive behavior therapy. This treatment involves retraining your thought patterns and routines so that compulsive behaviors are no longer necessary.

The bottom line is, “Don’t be afraid or ashamed to admit you need help!” No matter what the situation, the very first and most important step to getting help is admitting that you need help. Push through your fears and reach out! Let others help you. Get on that pathway to better mental health today!

This Psychological Article on Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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What Is Co-Dependency?

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

CoDependency

A Psychological Article by Boomeryearbook.com

Many times, we know there’s something wrong in our lives; we just can’t identify exactly what it is. That’s the way it is with co-dependency. In this psychological article we will discuss the signs and symptoms of co-dependency.

It’s one of those psychological disorders that we hear a lot about but never even consider whether we might be afflicted with it. We don’t know what it is exactly and we don’t care because we’re certain that it’s not something we have to worry about.

It may surprise you to learn that millions of Americans suffer from co-dependency and don’t even know it. It’s actually easy to see how that could happen once you know a little about this. In this psychological article we will see why.

The first and most important reason for this is that co-dependency is a learned behavior that is passed down from one generation to the next. Since you saw this type of behavior on a regular basis in your own home, it doesn’t feel strange to you at all.

In this psychological article, it becomes clear that co-dependent people come from dysfunctional families. This is probably the second most important reason why a person can go for years with this psychological disorder and never realize it.

In a dysfunctional family, the family members have a tough time admitting that there’s anything wrong. They’re in denial. They don’t openly discuss problems or their feelings. They repress everything pretending that there’s nothing wrong.

Many times though, family members will be in such pain that they will turn to alcohol, drugs, sex or other additions in order to make themselves feel better.

This psychological article will present a few symptoms of co-dependency. Ask yourself honestly, if you or any member of your family displays these types of behavior:

1. Difficulty making decisions
2. You become hurt when people don’t recognize your efforts.
3. You feel responsible for everything all the time.
4. You make extreme efforts to hold onto a relationship because you have such a fear of abandonment.
5. You have no boundaries. You will allow anyone to do anything to you without complaining.
6. You feel guilty if you try to assert yourself.
7. You have an exaggerated need for the approval of others.
8. You’re angry a lot and may have a problem with lying or dishonesty.
9. You are drawn to people who are in trouble and need to be rescued.
10. You don’t trust anyone and have a problem allowing people to get close to you.

All psychological articles agree that Co-dependency is treatable. There are many great treatment programs out there.

Though there are a large number of self-help books on co-dependency, by its very nature, it’s a disease that you can live in denial about for many years. Therefore, it is highly recommended that you seek profession help. Psychological articles may be helpful but not a cure.

If you suffer from co-dependency then you likely haven’t let your hair down and been real with anyone for many years. All psychological articles agree that you need this type of relationship with a trained professional that you can build trust with.

Co-dependency is a disease where there’s a great deal of guilt and shame, but recognize that this is part of the illness. Refuse to let that stop you from seeking help. Studying psychological articles that confirm this can help move you forward into counseling.

You can be healthy. You can form normal, healthy relationships with people. You know you want to do that. You simply need a little push in the right direction.

This Psychological Article on Co-dependency is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of suggestions on coaching and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Keep Aspirin by your Bedside to Treat Heart Attack

Tuesday, May 19th, 2009

Preventing Heart Attack Death: Keep Aspirin by Your Bedside

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems

By Boomeryearbook.com

Yes, Aspirin saves lives! Keep it in your home always! It can no doubt tame headaches but it can also expand prevent heart disease and save your life if you are having a heart attack. The number of elderly problems of baby boomers surviving a heart attack can increase to 10,000 simply by chewing a 325 mg aspirin tablet at the first sign of chest pain or any other heart attack symptom.

Baby boomers have long been alerted to the fact that heart diseases are a major elderly problems and the thickening of blood that can precipitate an attack must be addressed. If you are unfamiliar with heart attack symptoms please remember these can include chest pain and also an intense pain in the jaw, nausea and excessive sweating. One of the insidious problems with diagnosing a heart attack is that almost all of us are familiar with the symptom of chest pain, but many of us do not realize that this elderly problem has gender specific symptoms as well as symptoms that may be misinterpreted as another elderly problem.

Keeping aspirin at your bedside can avoid a potential fatality if you are having a heart attack as keeping aspirin by your bedside can save your life if the attack occurs while you are in bed or during sleep. It is believed that 60% of baby boomers experiencing the elderly problem of a heart attack do not wake up! However, if you are one of the lucky ones and are awakened by symptoms then you can instantly take two aspirins with a glass of water to survive, or even just chew the aspirin, and call 911 to get yourself to the hospital.

Another major benefit of aspirin in alleviating an elderly problem is that continuing to take aspirin regularly after a stroke or heart attack has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of mortality or having another life threatening episode thus showing that aspirin has both acute as well as long term health benefits. Baby boomers please remember! Aspirin helps overcome elderly problems related to the heart. It prevents blood clotting by interfering with the blood platelet clot formation; making platelets less sticky and thus preventing unhealthy clotting.

Aspirin, a true wonder drug, has been marketed for the last eighty years and has helped save many lives and reduce elderly problems such as reducing prostaglandins, lowering body temperature, reducing and/or eliminating headaches, inflammation and pain.

People have strongly believed that heart diseases are more frequent among men than women. However, this is a fallacy and a heart attack can prove fatal for both genders. It is true that aspirin is not just beneficial for male baby boomers elderly problems as it is equally effective for women. Research has confirmed that this drug can lower the chances of a heart attack by twenty-five percent among women if it is taken one to six times in a week. Therefore, we hope boomers will share this information with all loved ones and help save lives.

The Psychological Article on Keeping Aspirin by Your Bedside to Save Your Life is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Baby Boomers Appear to Be Less Healthy Than Our Parents

Saturday, May 2nd, 2009

Psychological Article on Baby Boomers: Comparing Health of Boomers to Elderly Problems of older Generations

Psychological Article on Baby Boomers: Comparing Health of Boomers to Elderly Problems of older Generations

Psychological Article on Elderly Problems


By Boomeryearbook.com

Lifestyles change as do the variables that we use to gauge that change. Health is correlated to the increase or decrease of sickness, the single variable by which we judge the most important aspect of a person’s lifestyle. But sickness or health is closely related to one’s state of mind, manner of working, social and family structures. That is why psychological articles have stated that in spite of regular gym attendance, avoiding smoking or red meat and following the general prescriptions for a healthier lifestyle, baby boomers are ending up less healthy than their parents.

This is largely attested by the fact that high cholesterol, heart ailments, blood pressure and diabetes have a higher prevalence among the baby boomer age group than their parents’ generation. The prime cause lies in a number of unhealthy trends, first and foremost of which is an increasingly obese and overweight population. Such weight problems exist in two thirds of the population and causes high blood pressure, more wear and tear on joints, diabetes, and other associated problems. Despite better understanding of health problems, baby boomers are less physically active as their work is mostly sedentary in nature and we hardly ever voluntarily walk, take the stairs, or do routine physical movements. This has caused baby boomers to physically deteriorate, in spite of better access to health care.

This data presented in numerous psychological articles is more surprising considering that baby boomers are more likely to have attended college thereby being more educated than their parents. However, this has not resulted in everyone having a healthier lifestyle. This correlation has been misunderstood primarily because physical health hasn’t been linked with psychological well being. Work stress coupled with more processed food and sedentary lifestyles have been major culprits. Therefore, nagging elderly problems have become common and often develop into serious illness if not rectified early.

Another interesting factor highlighted in psychological articles contributing to elderly problems that show baby boomers to be less healthy than their parents is changing family structures and social norms, for example, a working women today doesn’t have an extended family to help raise a new born child, or any help and support in a emotional crisis. This causes stress and pressures that were previously dealt with through family support, and has reached acute proportions for boomers juggling two jobs, raising kids and helping with grandkids, and delivering on other commitments. The major effects of such a change are on the elderly problem of the emotional well being of a population that has not yet devised mechanisms to resolve such issues.

The consequences of reduced health and chronic disease will be a constant headache for policy makers in the years to come. The brighter side is that we baby boomers are well familiar with the fact that statistics can be deceptive. While psychological articles tell us that baby boomers are not as healthy as our parents were, it may well be that as diagnostic procedures become more sophisticated, baby boomers are benefiting from earlier diagnosis that were not previously detectable; thereby getting healthcare at an early stage. Moreover, life expectancy has steadily risen over the decades; seemingly discrediting the psychological articles that say today’s baby boomers are less healthy than their parents were at the same age.

It’s an interesting debate. We at BoomerYearbook belive knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Scurvy-Like Vitamin C Deficiency: The Real Culprit in Heart Attack?

Saturday, May 2nd, 2009

Psychological Article on Elderly Problems: Vitamin C and Heart Health

Psychological Article on Elderly Problems: Vitamin C and Heart Health

By Joey for Boomeryearbook.com

According to what recent psychological articles have stated, unlike most other living creatures, the human body does not manufacture collagen, Collagen is what the body needs to repair blood vessels.

Repeated episodes of stress causes arteries to expand (flushed face when you are angry or upset) and then contract. Done too frequently (frequent stress points), this leads eventually to cracked and weakened arteries.

The brain does not like cracked arteries which threaten its existence so it rushes to repair those cracks. For this, it needs copious amounts of collagen.

Since, unlike most species, humans do not manufacture their own collagen, when faced with an emergency such as an artery which is weakening, and knowing it can’t wait until the host has a few oranges etc., the body grabs a substitute from its all-purpose repair kit. The repair tool it grabs is plaque. The body repairs arterial cracks with plague. Since that plaque is then found at the site of a failed or collapsed artery, doctors were quick to decide plaque causes heart attacks. But this is not true.

In 2002, researchers at the University of North Carolina found that vitamin C deficiency “severely compromises collagen deposition and induces a type of plaque morphology that is potentially vulnerable to rupture.” In other words, the cause of most heart attacks is vitamin C deficient stress, which over over time causes arteries to become weak (repeated expansion and retraction) and then collapse. If the body had a sufficient supply of natural collagen, it could do the necessary repair work correctly instead of using plaque but since it doesn’t, it can’t.

The purpose of all this is to tell you that all adults, beginning around age 30, should begin adding Vitamin “C” to their diets on a daily basis. Since Vitamin “C” can only be absorbed at a rate of about 500 mg an hour (give or take a little), people need to take 500 mg Vitamin “C” tablets scattered through the day at least one hour apart. For most adults if taken regularly about 2,000 mg daily is fine give or take a little. But since collagen is not retained in the body, it needs to be replenished regularly. Now this:

“And here’s the shocker . . .


This Scurvy-Like Vitamin C Deficiency Could
Be the Real Cause of Heart Disease

and so on………

Yes, lack of Vitamin C is the culprit.

We at Boomer Yearbook believe knowledge is power and will continue to bring you updates on this important subject.

References:
1. New England Journal Medicine. 353:46–57, 2005
2. J Agriculture Food Chemistry 52: 6818–6823, 2004
3. Circulation 105: 1485–90, 2002

Boomer Yearbook is Infromational Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Elderly Sleeping Problems

Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

Elderly Problems: Insomnia

Elderly Problems: Insomnia

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems


By Boomeryearbook.com

According to the Encarta Dictionary, insomnia is the “inability to fall asleep or to remain asleep long enough to feel rested, especially when this is a problem that continues over time,” and unfortunately this condition of sleeplessness is one of the most frequent elderly problems. Psychological articles tell us that it often results from sleep cycle changes that occur with aging as well as various other elderly psychological, emotional, and bodily changes. Most elderly patients are very light sleepers because their sleep cycle is shorter than that of a child’s or a young adult’s. The elderly problem of disrupted sleep often derives from the elderly person’s sleep being fitful and restless and, consequently, abruptly waking many times during the course of a night.

It is important to note that insomnia is generally not an exclusive elderly problem in and of itself. Insomnia is often linked with or caused by other elderly problems such as arthritis pain, emotional stress, etc. If a patient is in any kind of pain or distress, whether it be physical or emotional, it can be hard to sleep soundly. Generally, psychological articles say that the patient’s underlying symptoms should be the first course of treatment to see if that alleviates the insomnia. If initial symptom treatment fails and there is still no improvement in sleep then a patient may consider looking to other treatments or medications for help falling and staying asleep. However, there is a risk of dependency with many medical sleep aids. In addition, it is not a good idea for elderly patients to use over the counter medications such as antihistamines for sleeping aids as they tend to have negative side effects in elderly patients, possibly even leading or exacerbating the elderly problems of confusion and delirium.

There are additional things that aging baby boomers and the elderly can do to facilitate sleep. For instance, eliminating bedroom temperature climate problems can make a tremendous improvement in alleviating insomnia, so it is advisable to check to see that the temperature in the bedroom is just right and not too hot or too cold. Another tip is to establish a regular bedtime routine; this means readying for bed and turning off the lights for sleep at the same time every night. Psychological articles refer to this as good sleep hygiene as it helps set the body’s natural biological clock, telling your body it is sleepy as it gets close to the accustomed bed time. Also, avoid the use of too much alcohol, especially around bedtime as it can disrupt your sleep cycle by first making you sleepy and then as the boost of sugar hits your system, waking you up in the middle of the night. Lastly, avoid taking daytime naps, specifically multiple daytime naps because this will also make it harder to sleep at night.

Whatever, the cause or causes of your personal insomnia, it is should not be considered a typical elderly problem. It is not a normal sign of aging so do not write it off as one. Consider all of your sources and possible causes. If you are still unable to fix the problem with some simple changes, contact your physician to see what he or she might recommend. A good night’s sleep is essential to maintain proper body functioning and that goes for every single person, young or old.

The Psychological Article on The Elderly Problem of Insomnia is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on Elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook contains Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

Elderly Problems: Working with COPD

Elderly Problems: Working with COPD

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems

By Boomeryearbook.com

Chronic bronchitis and emphysema (also known as COPD) is a serious medical condition in which both lungs are damaged by partial obstructions to the tubes that carry air to the lungs. This condition is similar to asthma in that it makes it difficult for a person to breathe properly. It is generally an elderly problem because COPD most commonly occurs either in current or former smokers, although breathing in other lung irritants or chemicals over time can also cause COPD.

It is possible for COPD to occur in younger people; however, it is usually diagnosed around middle aged or as an elderly problem. This is because it takes several years to develop or before any symptoms are noticed. Shortness of breath is the most common symptom. This disease causes the little sacs in the lungs that inflate with air to lose their shape and become floppy so that they are unable to hold air. This in turn causes the airways to become inflamed, producing more mucus than usual, clogging the airways even further.

It is not contagious and neither is it a curable elderly problem. It is a serious elderly problem because it is a leading cause of death among elderly patients. It can lead to other illnesses as well since, to a degree, it affects the immune system. In fact, according to www.medic8.com, COPD is “the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and throughout the world.”

It is imperative that people take notice of the symptoms of this elderly problem, such as a chronic cough, excess mucus production, shortness of breath that occurs especially with exercise, a wheezing sound when breathing, and chest tightness. The cough with mucus starts to occur many years before it becomes hard to breathe. It is important to note that just because you have a cough; it does not mean you have COPD. Likewise, just because you have COPD, it does not always mean you have a cough.

Since this elderly problem is non-curable, management is used to treat the symptoms rather than the disease. Goals of treatment include, relieving symptoms with as few side effects as possible to slow the progress of the disease, trying to prevent any unexpected problems or complications from developing, and trying to improve the over all quality of the patient’s health. The degree of treatment is based on how mild or severe are the individual’s symptoms. If necessary, medications will be prescribed to aid with better breathing. If handled with good remediation, this elderly problem will not prevent you from living a normal, long, and active life.

The Psychological Article on Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema
is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on Elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook contains Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Atrial Fibrillation

Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

Elderly Problems: Atrial Fibrillation

Elderly Problems: Atrial Fibrillation

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems


By Boomeryearbook.com

Atrial fibrillation is an arrhythmia of the heart, or an irregular heart beat. It can be chronic or occur in episodes. People with atrial fibrillation are five times more likely to have a stroke according to www.medic8.com. Although it can be a problem for everyone, it becomes an elderly problem because high blood pressure, heart disease, and cardiomyopathy are all contributing causes to atrial fibrillation and these causes are among other problems that are more common in the elderly. In fact, according to psychological articles and research, the likelihood of developing atrial fibrillation increases with age, especially in people over the age of sixty five.

Atrial fibrillation is usually asymptomatic; nonetheless, there sometimes are signs that one can look for such as chest pains, palpitations and shortness of breath, fatigue, lightheadedness, and fainting. Once this particular elderly problem has been diagnosed, treatment options vary. Drugs may be prescribed to slow the heart rate down. In addition, electric shock may be used to restore normal heart rhythm if medication does not work and radiofrequency ablation may also be effective if medication doesn’t work. Lastly, surgery can be used to disrupt electrical pathways that cause atrial fibrillation or used to insert a pacemaker under the skin to generate a normal heart beat.

Research informs us that if left untreated, atrial fibrillation is likely to lead to a stroke. In fact, the American Heart Association suggests that this particular heart arrhythmia not only be treated, but rather be treated aggressively. If a patient with atrial fibrillation under the age of seventy-five is at a low risk for a stroke then the common household drug of aspirin may be all that is prescribed. Otherwise, a drug called Warfin is often used to thin the blood. However, Warfin carries more risk of side effects than asprin, such as bleeding or ulcers, and thus aspirin may be the first choice for less advanced cases.

If your list of elderly problems include any of the above listed symptoms, please be sure to tell a doctor about them immediately to ensure your health and safety. As stated above, atrial fibrillation may carry no symptoms. But then again—your seemingly unrelated symptoms may be signs of even greater problems. Please be aware and take notice of what your body is telling you.

The Psychological Article on Atrial Fibrillation is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on Elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook contains Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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