Archive for the ‘Dreams’ Category

Boomer Dreams of Death and Sex: Are Dreams Telepathic Messages?

Sunday, November 1st, 2009

Behind the Boomer Dream Mask

Behind the Boomer Dream Mask

By Boomeryearbook.com

Everyone has experienced a dream or nightmare so real that confusion is experienced upon waking: Did it really happen? Where am I? As the details of the dream come back, we attribute meaning to the events that took place within the dream and wonder if there is a message to be learned.

Baby boomers might sometimes begin to experience dreams that are quite different to the dreaming experiences of early life.

As baby boomers enter the later stages of life, friends begin to take ill or even die. The process of death begins to have a greater impact on the lives of baby boomers and the circle of friends begins to shrink as the years go by. The psychological effect of losing those close to us might certainly influence what we dream about and how we interpret those dreams.

For people who have more than a passing interest in dream interpretation and who are driven to translate their dreams into tangible evidence of real events, dreaming of their own death can cause them to panic, understandably, that their own demise is around the corner and that a grisly end is in store before too long. For many, the dream might simply be the result of attending or hearing about one too many funerals but for someone with a belief in dream psycho-analysis, the reality of dreaming of preparing for death or even actually dying can be distressing.

Unlocking Dream Symbols

Unlocking Dream Symbols

The atmosphere that is prevalent within the dream is important. A dream that deals with death in a matter of fact way might simply be an indication of re-birth rather than the opposite event. The presence of darker feelings, however, might cause more worry.

Death Dreams

Death Dreams

One of the more serious side effects for aging baby boomers who are having intensely ‘real’ dream experiences is the resulting rise in blood pressure, insomnia as a result of reluctance to sleep lest the dream recur and other emotional problems causing distress and emotional upset.

Dreams that portray intense sexual activities, either as a spectator of someone else’s adventures or as a participant, are quite normal and may not mean anything at all, other than a healthy interest in sex, regardless of age. For people who have been recently bereaved, sexual dreams can be vivid and disturbing but tend to diminish in frequency over time.

For dreamers who find their night time experiences disturbing enough to seek professional dream analysis, the findings can be fascinating and revealing, not only with regard to how dreams are analysed but how our dreams can affect our physical functions.

Sleep walking and other nightmare connected or dream-state activities should be dealt with carefully and gently to avoid shock on waking. Professional psychological advice should be sought if dreams recur in a disturbing manner over time, not just for baby boomers but for any generation.

Dreams are emotional connections to our conscious state and should be treated seriously and intelligently when analysing their impact on our daily lives; but always remember-the language of dreams is symbolic, and not a one-to-one relationship with waking life.

The Psychological Article on Boomer Dreams of Death and Sex: Are Dreams Telepathic Messages? is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Baby Boomer Guide to Hypnopompic hallucination – what it is and what it isnt

Friday, September 25th, 2009

Hypnopomic Dream Image

Hypnopomic Dream Image

Psychological Article on Elderly Problems

By Boomeryearbook.com

Pscyhological articles define a hypnopompic hallucination as a vivid dreamlike hallucination that occurs as one is waking up. It is recognized as the opposite of an hypnagogic hallucination, which occurs as one is falling asleep.

(Medicinenet.com)

By the time we reach the age of being a boomer, most of us have all been through weird and scary experiences while sleeping – experiences such as seeing ghosts floating around in the room or feeling the touch of a cold, lifeless spirit. Contrary to conventional wisdom, this certainly does not mean that the person having these experiences is going crazy. Even though the experience of seeing a unicorn in your bedroom may come across as undeniably real; there is a rational and scientific explanation to these occurrences and all that one needs to do is take a step back and relax in the understanding that this is just your brain’s way of snapping out of “dream mode” and back into “waking mode”. In layman’s terms, the brain is in a state of limbo (so to speak) – it’s pulling the cord out on the dreams and plugging back into waking consciousness.

This occurrence is known as hypnopompic hallucination. This happens when one opens his/her eyes while in a dream state causing the dream images to get overlaid by the images of the bedroom – for a brief moment, this results is an amalgamation of dream and real images and since the eyes are open, the brain assumes all of this is taking place in the bedroom.

The same mechanics are at work for other sensations as well. For example, if one feels the cold touch of a dead relative or friend then that simply means the brain is beginning to overlay the weakening dream sensations with your real life kinesthetic sense. So, the sound of beating drums in the other room, the sight of flying horses and brief encounters with unknown floral scents can all be explained by hypnopompic hallucination.

This process can also work in reverse – meaning that the brain could go into “sleep mode” even while you are partially awake. The process of dreaming is a helpful (yet complicated) phenomena. Usually its purpose is to reflect and symbolize the thoughts, feelings and emotions we engage in while awake. So, for example if you jump into bed and feel as if some one has slid into bed with you then that’s a case of your brain going into dream mode while you are still awake. However, it also reflects the fact that you are not expressing yourself entirely during your waking hours. The “someone” that slides into bed with you is actually the real you which your brain interprets as separate as it switches into “dream mode” – it’s a symbolic way of being told to, ‘reconnect, express and become one with who you really are’.

It’s important to not get scared when confronted with such experiences; but rather to relish and marvel at the intricacy and power of the human brain. It’s also important to journalize your dreams and use the content of your dreams to make improvements in your waking life. No matter how your dreams make you feel; know that the power lies in deciphering the symbolism and taking action towards positive change in your waking hours.

Hypnopomic Dream Image

Hypnopomic Dream Image

The Psychological Article Baby Boomer Guide to Hypnopompic hallucination – what it is and what it isnt is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Animals in Boomers Dreams: Common Meanings

Friday, March 6th, 2009

Common Meaning of Animal Dreams

Common Meaning of Animal Dreams

By Boomeryearbook.com

We have all heard of the phrase Animal Instinct; and if we believe Darwin’s theory regarding the evolution of man, then we have to admit there is a certain animal instinct in all of us, in some more than others. Seeing animals in dreams signify different things for different people. It may be a symbol of one’s sexual nature or some primitive desire that we keep trying to push back into our subconscious.

There are different kinds of “archetypal” (Jung) interpretations of dreams associated with animals. Some of these “universal” meanings are mentioned below to help the baby boomer generation better understand the subconscious mind:

• You may see a talking animal. This manifests knowledge and wisdom beyond what is normal.
• Saving the life of an animal shows a person’s effort to overcome some inadequacy or some overwhelming experience. It may also mean that the dreamer is identifying with the traits of that certain animal.
• Animals like cockroaches, hamsters, frogs or what we can group as lab animals denote an inability to show emotions adequately. Also, that a person may be limiting himself as regard to his choices and beliefs.

Boomer Yearbook reviewed psychological articles for the baby boomer generation to answer their questions about seeing different species of animals. Here is what we at Boomer Yearbook, website for the baby boomer generation, discovered:

1. Apes show dishonesty. Apes also stand for a wild sexual nature.
2. Bats indicate lack of cleanliness and annoyance. They may also symbolize a will and effort to quit a bad habit. Also, they may signify that a person is entering into a situation blindly. There are various kinds of bats and their dream symbolism depends on which type you see. Seeing a white bat is considered a symbol of death, a black bat of private calamity, and the non scientific research views a vampire bat as symbolic that someone is attempting to suck out all your confidence or assets.
3. Bears may be symbolic of the life cycle, or of inner evaluation and judgment. They also stand for new beginnings in life. If you dream of getting attacked by a bear it is said to represent feelings of competitiveness and a measure of your ability to overcome obstacles.
4. Buffalos signify survival. A dead buffalo or one that has received injury is supposedly a warning that you must not take on any new ventures; whereas a buffalo herd shows consistency and prosperity.
5. Bulls are said to denote a rich, fulfilling and prosperous life. They also stand for strength and command. Virility, repression of sexual needs are also said to be symbolized by bulls.
6. Camels stand for the need for conservatism in life. They show the trait of holding on to emotions instead of letting go and expressing feelings. On the other hand, they have also been said to signify the ability to face adversities and be able to find solutions to problems.
7. Cats in dreams show deceit but for a person who loves cats they may signify sexuality, authority and originality. A violent cat biting you indicates irritation and a certain level of dread usually when things are not going according to plan. Chasing away a cat stands for your ability to conquer any impediment. Black cats are associated with psychic abilities and a person’s fear of testing them.
8. Dogs as one would expect, denote faithfulness, compassion and security. We of the baby boomer generation love our dogs but dreaming of aggression in a dog shows deception and a dead dog denotes the loss of a close friend. Dressing up a dog means you are trying to cover some personal flaw. A dog that bites you supposedly stands for your feelings of uncertainty in a situation.
9. Elephants stand for power, vigor and wisdom. Riding an elephant signifies your fearlessness in facing your weaknesses. Dreaming of elephants may also denote your own shy nature.
10. Deer show peace and beauty. A streak of independence within your personality is also manifested in the form of a deer in your dreams.

We at BoomerYearbook want to stress that while certain dream images may be archetypal or have a universal meaning to most, that as we’ve stated in our article,
http://boomeryearbook.com/blog/2009/01/13/how-unique-dreams-and-their-symbolism-can-be/
all dream interpretation MUST be subjective to the individual dreamer.

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological-Informational Social Networking Website for Baby Boomers and baby boomer generation! Create Boomer Yearbook Profile, Connect with old and new Baby Boomers, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join this website for baby boomers and let your opinions be heard.

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Dreams of Unknown Children

Thursday, March 5th, 2009

If you see an unknown child in your dreams ask:How old are you?

If you see an unknown child in your dreams ask: How old are you?

How old are you?

By Boomeryearbook.com

Every now and then people report dreams of a baby or a child that they have never seen before. Although it is not as common as some other symbolisms reported in dreams, it does occur. And if someone asks you, you can probably remember the age of the child, maybe even the exact age, even though you claim to have never seen that child before in waking life.

Jane Teresa Anderson wrote a psychological article on her dream site suggesting that in order to find out what the unknown baby or child might represent, begin by asking yourself “how old was the dream child”. However, she stresses not to take a long time answering this simple question but, to go with your gut instinct and give the first answer that comes to mind. According to Anderson, the age of the child represents how long ago in the past something in your life occurred that caused you to dream. She claims that if you try it, you will find it to be an “amazingly accurate indicator”.

Your next step is to ask yourself what was happening to the child in your dream. Was it hurt or lost? Did the child lose something or was the child scared? Once you find out what the child was doing, you can then ask yourself how that applies to your life. Let’s say you identified the child as scared and feeling lost. She was 6 months old. You then realize that six months ago you lost someone you cared deeply about and have been feeling lost without that person.

The preponderance of psychological articles on dream interpretation report that most dreams correlate to real life experiences or emotions. Usually they simply translate the events of the day (i.e., Freud’s Day Residue), into the symbolic imagery experienced as a dream. However, dreams can also be reflective of “unresolved” past life events. Psychological articles tell us that oftentimes, we humans try our best to suppress our conflicted or traumatic emotional responses, not wanting to face or deal with them. One side effect of this emotional denial is to have our dreams be our “alarm signal” (Gayle Delaney), as the dreaming mind will free the reigns of denial and allow or even force us to confront whatever it is that we have been trying to push out of conscious awareness.

Our best advice at Boomer Yearbook is not to fight it. See if you can figure out the root emotional cause of your dreams and what the dream represents to you. You might find yourself more at peace both in your waking and dreaming life.

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological-Informational Social Network Website for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join now to discover the many ways this website for baby boomers can contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness.

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Strangers in Your Dreams

Thursday, March 5th, 2009

Dream Strangers: Memories of Today or Past Lives?

Dream Strangers: Memories of Today or Past Lives?

By Boomeryearbook.com

It can be a disquieting thought to to think that you can dream of someone that you’ve never in your life met. But if you are out in public and in a cab, let’s say, someone has to be the cab driver. It may be that the focus of your dream is on something or someone else so your mind conjures up some complete stranger with a face you’ve never seen before.

Some people claim that there is no such thing as dreaming about a stranger—that somewhere, somehow we have seen that person somewhere before in our waking lives. These people claim that there is such a vast majority of faces on this earth that is impossible to remember every face we’ve ever seen, but somehow the mind does. There are examples of people describing their dreams of supposed strangers only to find out that it was actually someone that had seen once or more in their past. You can find some of these examples by doing a search on the web.

Yet, another strange theory—or maybe not so strange if you believe in that kind of thing—is that the strangers in your dreams are not strangers at all, but in fact, people that you knew from a past life. This theory says that if you have been reincarnated, you can still dream about or recognize people from a former life in your dreams.

What is your take on this? Have you ever experienced a dream similar to the ones described above? Do you even have your own theories as to why you dream of a complete stranger? Do you believe that the mind can create a totally new human face out of nothing? We at Boomer Yearbook believe anything is possible when it comes to our dreaming minds.

Boomeryearbook.com is a social networking website connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with psychological articles on dream interpretation, online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways this website for baby boomers, echo boomers and booming seniors, can optimize physical and emotional wellness.

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Freud’s Psychological Theories About Dreams

Thursday, March 5th, 2009

Psychological Articles on Unlocking Dreams

Psychological Articles on Unlocking Dreams

By Boomeryearbook.com

Dreams are one of the very important psychological issues; as many psychological articles tell us a dream is more than just a random compilation of the unconscious mind. In fact, psychological theorists believe that a dream actually gives us a window of insight into what the unconscious mind is really thinking and believing. Originating with Sigmund Freud, the theorists represented in these psychological articles posit that dreams are a tool to uncovering things that we have repressed or kept hidden from our waking consciousness, and thus these thoughts and feelings become conveyed to us as “alarm signals” through our nighttime reveries. In other words, to these theorists, all dreams represent something of subjective psychological importance; and oftentimes this emotional material is objectionable to the person’s conscious waking ego.

Freud’s dream theories are representative of the psychological (i.e., non random) approach to dream interpretation; as he believed that dreams are the doorway to understanding the unconscious mind. He believed the psyche had three parts: the id, the ego, and the superego. It is a bit of a complicated theory, but basically, Freud believed that dreams occur because of the ego defense theory, which is the waking ego, our conscious minds, defending our more vulnerable subconscious minds from allowing in material the conscious ego would find unpleasant and objectionable. Therefore, if the conscious mind isn’t willing to deal with conflicted or difficult waking issues, the unconscious dreaming mind will push through the conscious ego’s defenses and present the material as dream imagery.

We all need to sleep! This is certainly a well known fact. Lack of sufficient sleep is harmful to both our minds and bodies. However, lots of differing psychological articles have different opinions on the role of dreaming. For Freud, when we sleep the ego part of our mind relaxes and, therefore, the unconscious mind is able to sort of influence our conscious mind. However, he says that if this actually happened it would wake us up, so our mind had to develop a defense against awakening. He explains that the ego begins to do what he called dream work, in which the ego can disguise thought of the unconscious nature by using symbols. In his theory, the symbols do not disturb our sleep and, thus, a dream develops.

Now what does all this mean, you ask? Well, basically, it means that there are two distinct levels of dreams. There is the manifest content, which Freud says is what you remember after you awake or the part that is remembered after the ego disguised it. And then there is the latent content, the true meaning of the dream. To go a step further, Freud thought that the symbolism in dreams were of two types: personal symbolism and universal symbolism. Personal symbolism contains symbols that are relevant to the dreamer while universal symbolism contains symbols that are universally recognized as having the same meanings, (i.e., similar to Jung’s concept of archetypes we discussed in http://boomeryearbook.com/blog/2009/03/04/dream-interpretation-using-title-or-one-line-summary/

What do you think? Do you believe there is any truth behind Freud’s ego defense theory? Or do you believe that each dream is unique to each individual and that there is no such thing as a universal symbol? You will find that the debate rages on. You can generalize a universal symbol as to the possibilities of what they generally represent, but you cannot say for certain that it means the exact same thing to every dreamer.

For further information on Freud’s theory and to read the full article upon which this one was based, you can visit the following website: http://www.psychlotron.org.uk/resources/sleep/AQA_A2_sleep_theoriesofdreaming.pdf, and we hope you can share your thoughts at Boomer Yearbook.

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological-Informational Social Network Website for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join now to discover the many ways this website for boomers can contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness.

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Dreaming of Celebrities

Thursday, March 5th, 2009

How pyschological articles interpret celebrity dreams

How pyschological articles interpret celebrity dreams

By Boomeryearbook.com

Some of us have gone to bed on what seemed like a totally normal night only to dream about someone famous that we don’t even know in waking life. That’s crazy, right? Why would you dream about a celebrity when you know nothing about their lifestyle or true nature? Well, it happens and it happens more often than you might think.

There are several reasons a celebrity might appear in your dreams. Sometimes the person is there to symbolize what you wish you were, want to become, or a lifestyle you would like to attain; (i.e. called a wish fulfillment dream in psychological articles). Many people wish and day dream about being famous or about knowing someone famous. Psychological articles and research suggest we frequently take this desirous wish one step further and have it fulfilled in our nighttime reveries.

Alternately, psychological articles have informed us that the famous person may be there to represent a certain hidden part of your psyche, what the famous psychologist Jung would call the “shadow” aspect of your personality. The conscious mind finds the “shadow” parts unacceptable and thus they seek outlet in the subconscious recesses of your dream imagery. For instance, you might dream about partying with someone that has been in the media a lot lately for too much party behavior; thus having the celebrity represent a shadow component. On the other hand, you might also dream about becoming best friends with a celebrity that you idolize or have always wanted to meet. This type of dream might be simple “wish fulfillment”; your dream is satisfying your desire to either become or befriend someone of celebrity status.

Another psychological theory about celebrity dreams is that a person who dreams about a celebrity is expecting a big turning point in their waking life. Psychological articles, tell us that in this type of dream the celebrity symbolizes the excitement and eagerness of it all. It could be a new relationship or a big move, a new job even–anything that is a major change for the future of the dreamer.

Lastly, a celebrity could represent some “real” person in your waking life; not necessarily even a high A list superstar. The “celebrity character” may in fact be left over “day residue” from a random actor or actress you saw on a television show, and subconsciously reminded you of someone with whom you really do interact. In this case, the psychological articles suggest that the characteristics of the role “the celebrity” plays represents some aspect of your real life acquaintance.

It may seem strange to wake up and remember that the person in your dream was not really the person it was supposed to be. Yet, next time you dream about a famous person, we at Boomer Yearbook want you to know that it is not such a strange thing at all.

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological-Informational Social Network Website for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join now to discover the many ways this website for baby boomers can contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness.

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Dream Interpretation: Using Title or One Line Summary

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Psychological Articles on Dream Archetypes: Black Cat

Psychological Articles on Dream Archetypes: Black Cat

By Boomeryearbook.com

Even though there are no exact formulas for interpreting a dream, many psychological articles affirm common “universal or archetypal” dream symbolism. However, as we’ve stated before,
http://boomeryearbook.com/blog/2009/01/13/how-unique-dreams-and-their-symbolism-can-be/
general guidelines about dream symbolism can never adequately reflect any one person’s individualistic significance represented by a dream figure. For instance, while psychological articles may give a generic interpretation to seeing a black cat in a dream as a symbolic omen of bad luck, it would be absolutely incorrect to make that a universal archetype for “all” dreams. Additionally, while it would be incorrect to collectively interpret that anyone who dreams about a black cat has had some type of bad luck in their past or will have in their future, if the black cat in the particular dream was in some way foreboding or scary, what you can interpret, but with caution and not certainty, is that it is possible the person dreaming about a black cat may be experiencing anxiety or worrying that a particular situation may be doomed for a bad outcome. This would be an even more reasonable interpretation if the dreamer proclaimed to “being superstitious” and fearing black cats, as in this individual’s case, the archetype might indeed “fit” and be meaningful symbolism for the dreamer.

Psychological articles, such as the ones cited in previous Boomer Yearbook dream articles, suggest a few methods to aid in interpreting your own dreams, and report a higher incidence of psychological self awareness in persons who are able to unravel their dream imagery and its significance. For instance, in one psychological article on dream interpretation, Jane Teresa Anderson suggests that you can start by summarizing your dream in just one sentence, or as the famous dream researcher, Galye Delaney suggests, give your dream a one line title. Both authors recommend this one line dream summary as an excellent step in understanding your own dreams; explaining that even if your dream was long and complicated, try summarizing the part that you remember the most, or the most vivid visceral “feeling” you were experiencing in your dream as an aid in finding meaning and interpreting your dream.

After summarizing your dream in a one line sentence or title, psychological articles suggest the next step is to ask yourself how that sentence applies to your waking life. You may find that your dream title, “I had an extreme fear of a black cat crossing my path and bringing bad luck” is representative of your fear of something bad interfering with your relationship and causing a break-up. You may then realize that a relationship rupture or break up has been on your mind and your dream is painting you a vivid picture, in the form of the black cat, as a way for your subconscious to communicate with your conscious mind to alert you to your anxiety. Once you interpret your mind’s “alert signal” as presented in your dream, you are in a much better position to understand how you truly feel about the waking life situation and how you want to deal with it.

The more you practice this technique, the better you will become at utilizing it. Remember it is just one possible technique, but it may be the one that works for you!

At Boomer Yearbook we recommend you keep a dream journal, and record your dreams, or whatever fragments of your dreams that you remember, as soon as you awaken. You will find that with just a little practice, usually a few nights or one week’s time, that you will have better dream recall and greatly improved subjective psychological understanding of your dreams and their significance to your waking life.

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological-Informational Social Network Website for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join now to discover the many ways this website for boomers can contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness.

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Shaman Principles for Understanding Dreams

Friday, February 27th, 2009

Elven Maiden Shaman

Elven Maiden Shaman

By Boomeryearbook.com

Psychological articles inform us that there are hundreds of different ways of interpreting dreams; and while not as frequently discussed in Western articles, shamanic principles for interpreting dreams are still quite popular in many Eastern philosophies and psychological literature. But, what is shamanism? Shamanism is a range of beliefs about how to get in touch with the spirit world; and in shamanic belief, the “otherly” world is inhabited by both good and evil spirits. There are many variations of shamanism but one of the basic principles is “everything is a dream and all dreams are real”. Shamans will tell you that the true source of reality is the mind. So, everything we see and do is actually all in our minds. And if we want to change the reality of our life, we’re going to have to get in touch with our minds. Our minds not only contain our fantasies but they also contain doorways to real places and real beings. In the West, thanks greatly to the creator of Psychology Sigmund Freud, dreams are labeled as just our imagination and are merely reflective of suppressed fantasies or desires for wish fulfillment. But, it’s interesting to consider the possibility of people having prophetic dreams, people who share the same dream and people who connect with others through dreams. Many cultures and beliefs attach great importance to dreams. Shamans believe that through dreams, we can understand our true nature, and also get in touch with spirit beings. It is held by shamans that every dream means something, and every dream should be respected.

According to psychological articles, the vast majorities of dreams are generally either good or benign and occur mostly when the dreamer is in the REM (rapid eye movement) sleep cycle. Oftentimes mundane dreams are not remembered, but our very vivid dreams and nightmares are hard to forget. Researchers and theorists tell us that there are several ways to increase dream recall. For instance, psychological articles report that people who keep dream journals are more likely to remember their dreams and even begin to understand personal dream significances and patterns. Upon reviewing your dream journal, dream researchers propound that you will find a great deal of insight into your waking life’s conflicts, pleasures, hopes and pain. And curiously, we are told that short afternoon naps greatly increase both dreaming and dream recall.

If you’re dreaming is quite dull and uninspirational, many Western psychological articles propose that it may be due to watching a lot of “heavy” unimaginative TV shows, part of the “day residue” we have cited in other articles on Boomer Yearbook, and you should limit your media exposure time so that your dreams reflect what’s going on in your head and not “stuff” you are vicariously watching. If you’re exposing yourself to a lot of ‘day residue” nonsense, many Western theorists feel that your dreams will reflect that and not give true insight into your personality.

However, shamans would interpret these “serious” dreams quite differently. As Mircea Eliade states in his book, Shamanism, Archaic Shamanism, Archaic Techniques of Ecstacy, Shamans are the archetypal figure representing “the wise old man (or woman)”, are believed to possess superior gifts of insight and knowledge, and to be intermediaries between the human and spirit worlds. Shamans hold that dreams reflect our true nature; thus a “serious” or dull dream would suggest the dreamer possesses negative energy and the shaman’s role as healer would be to call upon the spiritual world to help transform the dreamer’s negativity into something positive. It is believed that seeing a shaman in one’s dream is a call for a supernatural guide to re-balance the dreamer’s energy field of flat negativity.

Shamans lead relatively simple lives and live in close knit communities, and since they believe dreams reflect our true nature; they believe in the need to “heal” that nature. They feel that dreams can be used as a vehicle to help the process of healing by having the shaman call upon the spirits to provide curative wisdom and answers to the illness of negativity.

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological-Informational Social Networking Website for Baby Boomers and Baby Boomer Generation! Create Boomer Yearbook Profile, Connect with old and new Boomers, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join now to discover the many ways this website for baby boomers, echo boomers and booming seniors can contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness.

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Sex Dreams: Sometimes a Cigar is Just a Cigar

Thursday, February 26th, 2009

Sex Dreams

Sex Dreams

By Boomeryearbook.com

Sex dreams can be common for both men and women although they are generally not discussed and considered a taboo topic. It is strange that it should be so today, considering how sex is so prevalent in today’s society. We see it everywhere from television to bill board ads and even in song lyrics. Yet, we rarely discuss the subject matter as it relates to dreams. Perhaps it is less embarrassing to watch someone else’s sexual fantasy on television or listen to someone else talk about them than to actually do so ourselves.

Whether you talk about your sex dreams or not, there is nothing to be embarrassed about. Like all other dreams, it is simply the unconscious mind working its many wonders as we sleep. The famous psychologist, Sigmund Freud, believed that people had sexual dreams because of repressed sexual desires and emotions. Of course, in his time, sex was very much a taboo topic. It was never discussed or displayed the way that it is today.

However, I suppose that it is possible that one could experience a sex dream because of repressed desires and emotions. Especially for the elderly and the baby boomers generation that did not grow up speaking as freely about sex. A dream could be about a particular sexual fantasy or about a particular person. A lot of times if a person has something (or in this case, someone) on the mind it will manifest itself in a dream. You may not even be thinking about that person in a sexual manner. Yet, the dream may bring to light some hidden or unwanted romantic feelings you may be feeling towards a person.

Even with all of the Freudian type theories, psychological articles inform us that it is also entirely possible that your sex dream meant absolutely nothing–nothing sexual anyhow. It could be that you are dreaming about a particular person from your past. This doesn’t mean that your marriage is in trouble or that you have feelings for someone else. It could just symbolize a particular time in your life. Maybe at that point you had adventure in your life or particular freedoms of the past. Perhaps it reminds you of a time in your life when you were not tied down with so many responsibilities.

Just remember when you have a dream of a sexual nature; it is nothing to be ashamed of or to be alarmed about. You should not immediately interpret the dream as something negative. Dreams often leave us puzzled and confused. We want to search for answers as to why we would dream a particular dream, especially if it is an embarrassing dream or something we think we should feel guilty about. Yet, we cannot control what our unconscious mind may be trying to accomplish. So do not over-think the situation and remember—it’s only a dream, or as Freud would say, “Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar”.

We at Boomer Yearbook agree with Freud. What do you think?

Boomer Yearbook is a psychologically based informational social network for echo boomers, baby boomers and booming seniors. Share your thoughts, upload pictures and find new or rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner.

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