Archive for the ‘Dog Lovers and Special Families’ Category

Making Provisions for your dog after you’re gone

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

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By Boomeryearbook.com

Dogs can be the companions of our later life and many people profess to love their dogs even more than they loved their departed relatives, especially relatives they were not particularly close to, such as the mother-in-law! People with elderly problems who are dedicated to their pets are well aware that they will probably not outlive their animals, yet very few make proper provision for their pets, should the worst happen.

The idea of sailing toward the end of life without making responsible provisions for a surviving spouse would be unthinkable for most people. Yet in spite of loving their pets to distraction, many neglect this vital provision and leave the fate of a beloved pet companion to chance. It is certain that a pet left alone after an owner’s death, especially an elderly pet, will have little chance of finding another home and they will probably end their days in some ghastly rescue center with hundreds of other unfortunate dogs and cats who were once treasured but sadly left behind.

Making proper provisions for your dog after your death is so easy. Many people with elderly problems who have an extended family can make arrangements prior to their death to ensure some younger member of the clan takes on Fido in his twilight years. Quite often there is someone delighted to have the chance of adopting a well behaved pet but in the confusion which follows bereavement, such things might be low on the list of priorities. By the time someone gets around to doing something about a treasured pet, it is too late and the poor dog has been destroyed or passed to a dog pound.

When you know you have elderly problems and you are considering how to leave your estate after death, it might be a good idea to write your intentions for your dog into your will and ensure your attorney is aware of your wishes where your pet is concerned. If there is no family member willing to take on an extra set of paws, there are some lovely doggy homes and hotels around as long as financial provisions have been put in place. These institutions are quite different from the state pounds where dogs are often kept in over crowded conditions due to the sheer numbers of abandoned animals.

Remember if you have more than one dog, to mention in your last will and testament if you do not want them separated. It is not unusual for dogs that have grown up together to form a strong attachment, in which case it would be cruel to part them.

For many people, their dogs are as close to them and as precious as their children. You would not entertain the idea of leaving your children without provision, so why not be as compassionate with the furry and faithful companion who sees you through every crisis in your life and sticks with you through thick and thin!

Making Provision for Your Dog After Your Death is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Getting a New Puppy: A Guide to Training a Puppy for the Baby Boomer or Booming Senior Owner

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

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By Boomeryearbook.com

The aging baby boomer or booming senior owner of a new puppy might already be experiencing personalelderly problems and the decision to welcome a new addition to the family may well have been made due to loneliness or the loss of a life partner. A pet can certainly help to reduce the effects of bereavement, partly because the nurturing process is therapeutic and partly because the company provided stems isolation at times of solitude, such as evenings and early mornings.

Older dog owners often have particular issues, such as an inability to move quickly. If you have a new puppy, make sure you use a harness and lead when you are out walking, rather than a simple collar arrangement which might easily be ‘slipped’, allowing puppy to escape onto a busy road. Be mindful that you are no longer as agile as you used to be and your elderly problems are likely to hinder your ability to catch a young puppy on the run, even if you had the inclination to try!

New puppies can be naughty and boisterous. Make sure yours gets enough exercise to reduce the risk of boredom and keep your own joints supple and free of elderly problems. Puppies that chew the furniture might have been left alone too long or given too much freedom during the teething stage. Also ensure you give your new puppy plenty to chew on and encourage him to exercise his sharp little teeth; that way he might leave your belongings alone!

House training needs to be addressed early and persevered with until puppy has learned to be clean. People with elderly problems cannot be cleaning doggy mess every day: it’s unhygienic, unnecessary and depressing. Take professional advice if your puppy is persistently soiling the rugs and do it soon to avoid naughty habits forming.

There is nothing nicer than having a lovely, cuddly puppy to snuggle into. For someone who is aging, a puppy can be solace for the children who grew up, for the grandchildren who live far away or for the wonderful wife or husband who is no longer around. Remember, however, to allow your puppy to interact with other people to promote his ability to socialize and reduce the risk of his becoming over protective and snappy with strangers.

Try not to spoil a puppy. Feeding at the table and handfed snacks between meals are a no-no if you want your pup to grow up with good habits and polite manners. Introducing snacks to a puppy can result in drooling – those awful slimy shoelaces that hang from the jowls and make everyone feel nauseous! Cute in a little puppy but repulsive in an older dog and puppies tend to grow up quickly! Feed only at mealtimes and always in puppy’s own bowl, never on a plate that is used for humans.

If you are going to allow your dog onto the sofa when he is full grown, that is certainly up to you. But if you are going to object to a fully grown Newfoundland taking up two thirds of the couch, do not allow him to get up there as a puppy! Once dogs have established their allowable territory, it is impossible to convince them to change their habits.

Getting a New Puppy A Guide to Training a Puppy for the Elderly Owner is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Making a Difference: Why Older Rescue Pets Deserve a Second Chance at Life

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

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By Boomeryearbook.com

One of the more annoying aspects of getting older and facing elderly problems is the requirement to make adjustments to our routine. Just at the precise moment when we begin to enjoy seeing the same friends we have seen every day for years, they start moving away or otherwise leaving us! So inconsiderate of them and before you know it, your social circle has halved!

Jokes aside, getting older necessitates a lot of changes as we begin to lose companions and also begin to develop elderly problems. Just as we lose our friends in older age, so do pets. Dogs who have served their masters loyally for many years end up in dog pounds because proper arrangements have not been made to give them a home after their owners pass away. Is there anything worse for a dog than finding himself in a cold cage locked up with a dozen barking and yapping strangers instead of being tucked up in his own bed?

What must go through a dogs mind when this happens? What did I do? Why have I been locked up here when I have been such a good boy? One of the worst character traits of the human race is its arrogance when it comes to pets. A man would not dream of leaving his wife destitute after his death (okay, some would but not the decent ones) yet he would leave his dog on the street.

The pets that have been deserted in homes and rescue centers all over the country deserve a second chance at life. Not all of them can find good second homes and many die in the pound, pining for the owner they loved and protected for so long.

Making a difference to an older pet can afford a great deal of personal satisfaction. Taking the decision not to adopt a puppy this time can be a lifeline for an older dog. They are so grateful and their loyalty is touching. At first they are tentative guests in your home but after a while they begin to integrate and deal with their new surroundings and become a valued friend and companion for an older owner and one who may be experiencing elderly problems in later life.

Most people whiz through early life without lending a second thought as to how they will spend their twilight years. Many fool themselves into thinking things will not change and their wives or husbands will be there forever. Immortality is something none of us can depend upon, however, and it is certain that that later life will bring bereavement and enforced adjustment to a new routine when loved ones and old friends are no longer present.

Elderly problems are unavoidable and the prospect of spending time alone for someone who has been accustomed to constant company can be daunting but many aging baby boomers and seniors reduce loneliness and isolation by bringing an older dog home for a second chance with a new friend.

Making a Difference: Why Older Rescue Pets Deserve a Second Chance at Life is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Giving an Old Dog a Home

Wednesday, September 16th, 2009

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By Boomeryearbook.com

Hopefully, everybody gets old, a sometimes unpleasant truth. Everybody has to face they are not getting any younger and start dealing with elderly problems that start to bite in our late baby boomer years, or sometimes earlier, and continue until we finally shuffle off our mortal coil, by which time hopefully we will have lived life to the full.

Predictably, our dogs get older with us and all too often we have to face the agony of losing a long term pet; a dog who has romped through the woods with us, played catch in the park, played with our children, seen off intruders (and occasionally one or two we would have preferred to be made welcome – we all make mistakes) and given us years of companionship and love.

What on earth do we do when our constant companion is suddenly gone? Many people vow never to get another dog but invariably they change their minds after a year or two and start looking for another doggy friend. Anyone who has returned home after a bad day to an ecstatic welcome from their dog will understand the feeling of comfort a dog can give. A dog’s affections are without strings. The equation is a simple ‘I will love you forever no matter what’. This is the kind of devotion you do not get from a fellow human being.

So as you are getting on and possibly have elderly problems to consider, what kind of dog do you look for? Well most people consider taking a puppy into their homes and of course puppies are cute but they do require a lot of hard work and attention in the early days of training and possibly someone with elderly problems might be better off with an older dog.

Every year many thousands of people die without making provision for the pets that are left behind. The faithful and loyal friend who has seen you through all your problems over many years might suddenly find himself locked up in the pound with hundreds of other dogs, scared and lonely and confused. At least consider giving one of these beautiful dogs a home. It’s not all about the cute factor, at least it shouldn’t be; a dog that is seven or eight years old might already have elderly problems but he also will have other years of life and love to give. He can’t be happy in a dog rescue center.

If you do decide to give an older dog a home, bear in mind that there might be a period of settling in. This might take six months and over that time your dog will get to know you and love you. At first there might be some hiccups. You might try to feed dry food to a dog that has always been fed on fresh meat. You might discover your dog has allergies to certain things, or he might not like the mailman or the neighbor’s cat. Patience will pay off and if you let your dog know you disapprove of bad behavior he will soon settle down.

Giving an Old Dog a Home is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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A Boomer’s Guide To Dog Ticks: II

Saturday, April 18th, 2009

Baby Boomers Guide to Dog Ticks

Baby Boomers Guide to Dog Ticks

By Boomeryearbook.com

Since dog ticks do not usually harm people, they can be seen as an almost harmless nuisance. Fortunately, in the case of humans, by and large it usually is. The same can’t be said for dogs, and lack of awareness of what dog ticks or tick-borne diseases (TBD) can do to your pet can have disastrous consequences.

The first sign of a problem is a number of symptoms such as a general lack of health, unexplained feverish spells, lethargy, and lack of appetite and in extended cases: anorexia. You sense that something is wrong but you and your Vet may be unaware that it is TBD and thus are treating the symptoms of a syndrome rather than the underlying disease. When such symptoms present yourself, always be on the lookout for TBD as a possible culprit.

Called ‘ehrlichiosis’ in veterinarian science, TBD has an extensive number of bacterium that are borne by different types of ticks. As some ticks are more common in some places than others, particular types of TBDs are prevalent in different parts of the country. The most common is Ehrlichia canis and German Shepherds are known to be prone to the disease. In most TBDs, including E. Canis, the basic area of attack is the bone marrow of the dog that is of central importance to the immune system. As a consequence, the immune system of the dog is compromised and your pet gets sick easily, and sometimes this leads to an undiagnosed case and thus the Vet treats each and every illness separately without understanding that they are all related.

The transmission of TBD is generally the same. People are often prone to believing that cleaner environments compared to farms or dumps means that TBD won’t be a problem. However that’s not the case. Ticks latch themselves on to the dog’s skin; near the ear, under the legs, neck and shoulder. It penetrates the skin with pincers which also keeps it in place. Bacteria are transmitted through these pincers that feed and mate through the host’s (your pet’s) blood. If you find a tick on your dog, take a pair of tweezers to the tick’s head and remove it completely as you do not want it to become even more embedded into your beloved dog’s body. Ticks are really dangerous to your dog as they can not only transmit bacteria but can also sometimes cause temporary paralysis while secreting chemicals; a condition called ‘tick paralysis’.

Aside from E. Canis, other types of TBD are Ehrlichia ewingii, Anaplasma platys, Neorickettsia risticii, Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Each type varies in the type of tick that bears the disease, the regions where they are more prevalent, the severity of the problems they cause and the manner they infect and sicken the dog. Invariably, if left untreated and on entering the chronic stage of a TBD, dogs usually die with organ failure or another disease that doesn’t respond to medicine, giving it the awful recognition as “quiet dog killer”.

After being briefly introduced to TBDs, some precautions can be made to avoid this dreadful problem. One of the first things is to keep your dog as clean as possible while closely observing its skin for any strange lumps, which can be an indication that a tick has latched onto your pet. Also be on the lookout for any repeated sicknesses, loss of appetite and the other symptoms noted in the above mentioned Article One. Also, keep your pet’s environment clean; it may not prevent ticks but it may lesson infestation.

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. So please use monthly dog and flea preventative measures and let your Vet check out any suspicious symptoms your pet may be exhibiting.

www.boomeryearbook.com is a free social networking site connecting the baby boomers generation. Whether you are a member of the baby boomers generation or are related to someone who is, you will find plenty to do here. Free psychological articles on a vast variety of topics such as dream analysis, coaching and self-help, elderly problems, examinations and proposed solutions for types of discrimination along with weekly updates on mental and medical health. You can also become a non-member subscriber to our free newsletter to receive these articles directly in your inbox so you don’t miss out.

At Boomer Yearbook you can share your thoughts, upload pictures and find old friends, or use our online optical illusions and brain games, provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner, to expand your mind and help ward off the possibility of depression, dementia and Alzheimer’s. Join now to discover the numerous ways in which this online social networking site for the baby boomers and boomers of all ages can contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness. The baby boomers generation changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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A Boomer’s Guide To Dog Ticks: I

Saturday, April 18th, 2009

Bayb Boomers Guide to Dog Ticks

Bayb Boomers Guide to Dog Ticks

By Boomeryearbook.com

Our precious dogs are definitely part of our families, yet unlike our human loved ones, our four legged relatives can not tell us where they may hurt or if they are feeling sick or uncomfortable. And since for the most part human and canines exhibit “different” signs of illness, it’s therefore quite understandable that we two legged creatures become confused in trying to interpret our pet’s symptoms. Fortunately, that’s where our Vets come into play as by and large our dog health providers, (and some very experienced dog owners) manage to avoid pitfalls or misinterpretations in dog symptoms and their related causes. However, there is one notable exception that can defy diagnosis by even the most seasoned Vet; that being dog tick-born disease (TBD).

Oftentimes ticks are mistakenly believed to result from “unsanitary” environmental conditions such as a neglected farm house or otherwise non-hygienic environment wherein TBD is seen as something lurking around just waiting to infect your dog. But this is far from the truth and can frequently catch a dog owner unaware as ticks do not discriminate and dog tick infestation is found in many upscale sanitized suburban neighborhoods. All dog owners need to be proactive in avoiding TBD (by using monthly preventative medications) as well as being on the lookout for all signs and symptoms as TBD can be difficult to diagnose and if left untreated can be fatal for your beloved pet.

Complicating matters further, some dogs who don’t have full blown symptoms of TBD are nonetheless carriers (i.e., think Typhoid Mary of the dog world), as dog ticks can live on other animals, can survive in non living environments such as dog bedding, towels, shoes and boots, carpets, or even hiding out in car upholstery just waiting for an unprotected dog to present itself for a good tick feed. While dog ticks are usually not interested in attaching themselves to people and are thus harmless to us 2 legged creatures, (remember we are talking about dog ticks illness TBD, not Deer ticks which can bring Lyme Disease to people), dog ticks love our dog’s blood and can easily latch on and cause problems. Some dogs tend to recover from a dog tick infection, however, a pet can be chronically sick, showing no or seemingly inconclusive symptoms, and can be gradually deteriorating before our unsuspecting eyes. Please be on the lookout as TBD can be solved if detected and treated early and of course, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure—ALWAYS remember to apply your dog’s monthly tick and flea medication.

Step one after seeing symptoms- get your dog to the Vet for a proper diagnosis. Your Vet will check your dog’s skin for lumps, either large or small, that may be latched on ticks. Second, be on the lookout for these possible symptoms of TBD:

1. Changes in appetite
2. Changes in urine and feces color
3. Your dog’s immune system might seem more vulnerable than it once was with evidence of lethargy, loss of appetite, fever and anorexia.

Any of the above may be a sign of onset of a TBD problem, and must be checked. Initially, TBD may be quite subtle but eventually, if untreated, TBD or ehrlichiosis can cause death.

There are various types of TBD with Ehrlichia canis being the most common, followed by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Ehrlichia ewingii, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Anaplasma platys, and Neorickettsia risticii. Each type, bacterium and tick alike, have various prognoses that share basic signs - but some are more treatable than others depending on the stage of the disease. The one thing they all share is deception, as TBD can mimic other illnesses. For example, tick paralysis is frequently misread as epilepsy, wherein the poor animal has a fit with momentary paralysis that looks like an epileptic attack. In fact, it’s a neurotoxin released by a tick into the bloodstream. Less dramatically though, lethargy, loss of appetite, fever and anorexia are signs seen in infected dogs.

Apart from recognizing that your dog might have TBD and taking him to a good Vet, other precautions are also possible. TBD doesn’t necessarily develop if you see a tick on your dog. Removing it is a precaution worth taking, however, care must be taken by removing it with a curved Kelly forceps, tweezers or a tool made for that purpose. Routine checking and keeping your dog clean are great ways to be proactive and not allow TBD to harm your pet.

Whatever the precautions taken TBD can still occur. The best solution is a general awareness of TBD, an understanding of your dog’s health, and early detection and treatment.

www.boomeryearbook.com is a free social networking site connecting the baby boomers generation. Whether you are a member of the baby boomers generation or are related to someone who is, you will find plenty to do here. Free psychological articles on a vast variety of topics such as dream analysis, coaching and self-help, elderly problems, examinations and proposed solutions for types of discrimination along with weekly updates on mental and medical health. You can also become a non-member subscriber to our free newsletter to receive these articles directly in your inbox so you don’t miss out.

At Boomer Yearbook you can share your thoughts, upload pictures and find old friends, or use our online optical illusions and brain games, provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner, to expand your mind and help ward off the possibility of depression, dementia and Alzheimer’s. Join now to discover the numerous ways in which this online social networking site for the baby boomers and boomers of all ages can contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness. The baby boomers generation changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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The Benefits of Dogs for the Elderly

Friday, March 13th, 2009

Psychological Articles: Benefits of Dogs for the Elderly

Psychological Articles: Benefits of Dogs for the Elderly

Psychological Articles:Resolving Elderly Problems with Dogs

by Boomeryearbook.com

The human-dog connection is a centuries old bond. There’s nothing like a sweet, attentive, loving dog to make you forget about day to day stresses as well as life’s major traumatic events. Psychological articles affirm that having contact with a responsive animal can do wonders for our physical and emotional well being.

Numerouspsychological articles have reported that as we age contact between people and their dogs can have even more beneficial effects; especially in resolving the elderly problem of loneliness. Too often, the elderly tend to lead isolated lives, and having a four legged, loving companion can provide a sense of purpose, fulfillment, and constancy that can help shield against the elderly problem of depression. Psychological articles have observed that dog owning aging baby boomers and seniors cope with daily activities better than their non-pet-owning friends.

Feel Good Effect

Psychological articles have stated that walking your dog and other routine caring tasks helps resolve the elderly problems of getting much needed exercise as well as alleviating loneliness and satisfying the craving for companionship. Simply playing with your dog raises both serotonin and dopamine levels-the brain nerve transmitters known to give calming and increased pleasurable sensations. Just think about this. People take heroin and cocaine to attempt to stimulate brain serotonin and dopamine levels, and this “artificial drug induced high” can be healthily achieved by getting a pet dog!

Alzheimer

Studies indicate that Alzheimer’s patients show lower stress levels and fewer anxious outbursts if there is a dog in the household. According to psychological articles, the mere presence of a dog can ease the effects of the disease.

AIDS

Hard as it is to admit, as a rule, the general public is not totally unbiased and empathic to AIDS patients. However, dogs are! They would give them the same unconditional and unbiased love that they would to a healthy owner. It is observed that AIDS patients who have dogs are far less likely to get depressed as compared to those without pets.

Heart Diseases

Psychological articles and research indicates that heart attack patients who own dogs have better chances of a speedy recovery than those without them. Dogs can feel the symptoms of a heart attack much quicker than any other animal. It is observed that dog owners have lower triglycerides and cholesterol levels. And as stated above, they also encourage the owners to exercise regularly as they need to be taken out for walks.

Anxiety Disorders

In a study conducted by the American Psychiatric Association, a trial therapy session was carried out which involved patients, a trained dog and its handler. The psychological article concluded that the patients who interacted with the trained dog exhibited significant improvements in mood and behavior such as reduction in anxiety levels and lessening of symptoms of dementia.

In a therapeutic program called ‘Project POOCH’, convicts volunteered to train homeless dogs with series behavioral problems. The aim was not only to train the dog but also to inculcate a sense of responsibility and accomplishment among the convicts doing the training. This project has been so successful for both the dogs and the convicts that it is being expanded with the hope that both dogs and convicts will benefit. The dogs are helping to make criminals more useful and functionally rehabilitated and once the dogs are trained, they are freed from shelters and possible death and provided with new, hopefully permanent homes.

Psychological articles show that throughout the world elderly people are being encouraged to keep dogs as the benefits of these friendly pets can not be denied. The benefits of owning a dog extend beyond companionship and pleasure, to the numerous physical and mental health benefits attainable with the help of these magnificent canines.

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological Articles -Informational Social Networking Website for Baby Boomers and baby boomer generation! Create Boomer Yearbook Profile, Connect with old and new Baby Boomers, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join this website for baby boomers, stay informed and let your voice be heard.

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First Pets

Saturday, December 13th, 2008

First Pets

First Pets

by Becky for BoomerYearbook.com

First pets are like first loves, they always hold a special place in your heart.

My first pet was a dog named Misty. I was 5 years old. Misty was part Collie, and part Doberman. She was the sweetest and most beautiful dog in the world. She was mainly black but had brown paws, and some patches of brown on her tail and on her face just above her nose, as well as some brown on her ears. Misty was only 9 months old when we got her. I remember going with my sisters to take her for walks. We would play catch outside in the backyard and she would run all over the place with the ball still in her mouth, just to make me chase her. I swear this was her favorite game.

Misty took to the whole family, but she was especially close with my Grandma. She would sleep on the floor next to my grandma’s side of the bed, and if Grandma moved even to roll over on her other side, Misty would lift her head up to make sure Grandma was alright. One time Grandma went away for 2 weeks to Michigan, and we weren’t sure Misty was going to make it while she was gone. Misty lay at the top of the stairs the entire time, hardly eating, and only moving to go outside to potty. She wouldn’t play as she missed Grandma so much.

A few years after we got Misty, I did get another pet, a parakeet. I never thought Misty bonded with me like she did Grandma, but once I got the parakeet (his name was Pudgy) Misty showed definite signs of jealousy. I didn’t keep Pudgy for long, as I saw that it upset my first love, Misty.

Sadly when I was 18, Misty became ill and she had to be put to sleep. The vet said there was nothing more they could do for her, and the most humane thing was to put her out of her misery. I never cried so hard in my life, but I knew she was going to a better place.

Now, being a mother, I have been able to see the excitement on my son’s face, and watch the bond between him and his first pet, Buddy (a parakeet) grow stronger everyday. I know someday he will look back and remember Buddy the way that I remember Misty.

Do you remember your first pet? What was his/her name? What kind of pet did you have? Take a walk down memory lane and share your story over at www.boomeryearbook.com

www.boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.

DOES YOUR DOG NEED LEGAL COUNSEL?

Wednesday, December 10th, 2008

DOES YOUR DOG NEED LEGAL COUNSEL?

DOES YOUR DOG NEED LEGAL COUNSEL?

by BoomerYearbook.com

If you think that you have heard and seen it all, then you might want to think again. Dogs now have their own legal counsel. Well at least indirectly. These types of specialized legal services are available for pet owners who have legal issues regarding their pets. It really is a great idea, because when you think about it there really are many legalities when it comes to pets.

There are issues when an apartment owner will not allow animals. Then there are all those dog bite lawsuits, which we read about. Therefore, when you put it this way it really does show a need for specialized law services. We use divorce lawyers all the time for marriage breakdowns. It makes sense to use the services of a pet lawyer for pet issues.

Actually, the kinds of legal issues that require the help of a lawyer can be quite serious. Often if it involves any type of lawsuit and then there are large amounts of money involved, as well as having to have the animal destroyed. Both of these can be quite devastating to the pet owner.

Everyone needs and should have some type of legal representation when having to attend court. So why not have the best in the field that is pertinent to your case. That is where these dog lawyers have made a smart move by promoting themselves as pet owner legal experts. There certainly will not be any shortage of clients for them. The pet industry is a huge business and the legal sector is just taking a piece of the pie, by tapping into the market with their services.

Non-pet owners probably think that it is just another way for lawyers to make money .They just cannot fathom putting out the type of money that would be required for these services. In fact, though a lost lawsuit could cost the potential client much more than the lawyer’s fees.

When it comes down to it, if you asked most pet owners which is the bigger issue, the chance of having to pay huge sums of money in the event they were to lose the law suit, or the risk of having their pet put to sleep, the latter is going to be the main reply.

Want more tips on pet owners’ rights? Have a comment or question you’d like to share? Come join with others at Boomer Yearbook for simple and effective coaching tips and strategies. Boomers Changed the world! We’re not done yet!

www.boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.