Archive for the ‘Types of Discrimination’ Category

Baby Boomers living a Tao-centered “sickness free” life

Friday, September 18th, 2009

Baby Boomers Tao guide to alleviating elderly problems

Baby Boomers Tao guide to alleviating elderly problems


By Boomeryearbook.com

The Tao Te Ching is a sacred text containing eighty one verses that were dictated by a self-realized man, Lao Tzu. Lao Tzu lived approximately five hundred years before the birth of Jesus – the Tao Te Ching is the most widely translated body of text after the Bible and its eighty one verses are believed to be the ultimate commentary on living a harmonious life by observing nature – this seems to be exactly what the doctor prescribed for the Seventy-six million baby boomers.

The 71st verse: Knowing ignorance is strength. Ignoring knowledge is sickness. Only when we are sick of our sickness shall we cease to be sick. The sage is not sick but is sick of sickness; this is the secret of health – a Wayne Dyer translation

Lao Tzu is teaching us that sickness simply implies that there is some imbalance in the mind or body. He is telling us that all sickness, mental and physical, stems from not being in tune with the great Tao (or the great Way) – in simpler terms, something about ‘you’ is not in agreement with the ways of nature. Even the slightest presence of a cough, cold, fever or fatigue indicates that there is surely a mental equivalent of that in the form of bad thinking habits - anger, fear, hatred, jealousy or guilt – a movement away from the pure compassion, love, acceptance and patience of the great Tao.

Taoist sages have rightly concluded that fear, hatred, doubt, impatience, greed or any other “ego-based” thoughts always end up creating some ‘dis-ease’ (hyphenated) in the mind or body. Thus, for optimum health, baby boomers will need to weed out such thoughts and to stay centered in the natural well-being of the great Tao by planting seeds of compassion, mercy, patience, well being and empathy. As a great mystic once said, “Don’t think of illness, think of health. Don’t think of thorns, think of flowers. Don’t think of ugliness, misery, think of beauty and joy”.

Practicing the Tao

Contrary to what baby boomers may think, the truth is that it’s never too late to make healthy changes in our lives. Start with cultivating a “happy mind” by refusing to entertain negative thoughts and feelings. Start to perceive a sneeze, an ache, a slight pain or any other form of minor discomfort as the body’s request to allow it to return to its natural healthy state by taking some time off, relaxing or simply going for a walk. A “happy mind” would naturally trust and follow the body’s messages knowing fully well that a body that’s often heard; never falls sick.

Baby Boomers will benefit from taking a good look at their habits, engagements and pursuits from a Tao perspective – ask yourself if these thoughts, habits or pursuits could be a cause of any mental and physical dis-ease (both now and in the future)? If the answer is yes, then simply make it a point that you will not continue to ignore this – after all ignoring knowledge is sickness and knowing ignorance is strength. We baby boomers simply have to take gradual and steady steps everyday towards weeding out negative and impure thoughts/habits/engagements from our lives and planting in seeds of compassion, sharing, peace and empathy.

When Sathya Sai Baba, a God-realized man in India, received multiple fractures to his hipbone; a disciple asked him how he could remain happy and blissful in such an apparent painful physical state. His reply was:

“People today need to learn to give up body attachments and experience their divinity within. Pain is a natural phenomenon. But suffering is a “choice”. I do not suffer, as I am not (just) the body”.

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Baby Boomers Alleviating Elderly Problems-Understanding the Tao to Alleviate Elderly Problems– bending is living

Thursday, September 17th, 2009

Alleviating Elderly Problems: A Taoist Approach

Alleviating Elderly Problems: A Taoist Approach

The Tao Te Ching is a sacred text containing eighty one verses that were dictated by a self-realized man, Lao Tzu. Lao Tzu lived approximately five hundred years before the birth of Jesus – the Tao Te Ching is the most widely translated body of text after the Bible and its eighty one verses are believed to be the ultimate commentary on living a harmonious life by observing nature – this seems to be exactly what the doctor prescribed for the Seventy-six million baby boomers.

The Tao is all about studying and learning important life lessons from nature. In the 76th verse of the Tao Te Ching, Lao Tzu invites us to change our perception of weakness and strength. He teaches us how the most hard and stiff organisms in nature are actually very weak and easily destroyed. On the other hand, anything in nature that’s yielding, flexible and gentle; proves to be the most durable. Isn’t it true that upon nearing death and decay a tree would become hard and stiff making it vulnerable to strong winds and fire? The wood of the tree becomes frail, feeble and stiff as it ages. Lao Tzu rightly points out that it’s the wood’s inflexibility and hardness that tends to make it weak. Isn’t this akin to all other organisms as well that become completely stiff and inflexible (weak) at the time of their deaths?

Being baby boomers we have all probably seen newly born babies who seem to be complete yoga masters and have no difficulty in performing amazing physical feats (like placing their feet in their mouth). We have all witnessed toddlers bump their heads and limbs against the walls and furniture in the house – each time they manage to shrug it off in a matter of minutes only to resume whatever they were doing. Within minutes they would make friends, have fights and then make up with them. It seems as if their bodies and their minds are flexible and supple – they are unafraid of being hurt, injured or looking silly. On a different note, they are also least bothered about which God the next door neighbor prays to or about how much wealth their school mates’ parents possess . Somehow, as we grow older physically our minds, thoughts, judgments and feelings become too stiff, inflexible and rigid – it’s sad that society judges us according to how fiercely we hold onto our beliefs and concepts of what’s right and what’s wrong. In order to live longer and happier, baby boomers need to bring about a shift in that kind of reasoning.

Alleviating Elderly Problems by Learning to Bend

Alleviating Elderly Problems by Learning to Bend

It seems as if our ability to listen more than we speak, to bend when necessary, to let go of grief and grudges and to allow our point of views to change with time and experience is very similar to a palm tree amidst a hurricane whose flexibility (apparent weakness) turns out to be its greatest strength.

We baby boomers need to look at their opinions and beliefs about touchy subjects like birth control, abortions and the death penalty and consider being in the position of someone who holds a contrary opinion. We need to look at things from his/her perspective and try to shake loose our unshakable opinion. Similarly we need to put ourselves in the place of people from different religions, different countries, different social statures, the opposite gender and a different generation in order to attain mental and physical longevity. As someone rightly said “The essence of illness is the freezing of behavior into unalterable and insatiable patterns”.

Please read the 76th verse of the Tao and try to meditate on how these words ring true in your own life:

“Men are born soft and supple; dead, they are stiff and hard. Plats are born tender and pliant; dead, they are brittle and dry.Thus whoever is stiff and inflexible is a disciple of death.Whoever is soft and yielding is a disciple of life. The hard and stiff will be broken. The soft and supple will prevail”

(From a translation by S. Mitchell)

Baby Boomers Understanding the Tao – bending is living is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of baby boomers psychological coaching tips and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Reflections of A Generation (pt. 5): Lifting the Veil – The Fight For Gender Equality in Iran

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Iranian Females fighting for Gender Equality


By Boomeryearbook.com

Iran Echo Boomers: Women Behind the Veil

Iran Echo Boomers: Women Behind the Veil

American baby boomers are well aware of the continual struggle to achieve gender equality in a male dominated society. In fact, Baby boomers, feminists, and other concerned activists continue to challenge perceived injustices to this very day. Iranian echo boomers are finding that their own struggles in this regard are very much akin to those that baby boomers experienced during the 1960s. The comparison is only in essence, however. For the Iranian activist, gender issues are more complicated than the simple bias of a misogynistic (in a cultural sense) social structure. Rather, there are the dual issues of cultural bias and religious beliefs that have to be dealt with.

What is worse, however, is that Iranian women have be subjected to oppressive restrictions under the guise of religion that in fact, have little or no basis at all in the tenants of Islam. What is problematic about this is that while cultural bias can be challenged to a significant degree, religious based restrictions cannot. Because Iran is a theocracy, challenges to the religious underpinnings are not tolerated. Protest of this nature will result in imprisonment or worse.

During the early period after the Islamic Revolution of 1979, this practice was especially rampant. Women, for example, could not seek a divorce from their husbands – regardless of the degree of ill treatment or abuse that was leveled against her. This is a clear contradiction to Islamic teachings which prescribe that women have recourse for divorce in abusive situations. Women, during this time, were also restricted from employment opportunities and it was recommended that they stay at home. Again, this is contrary to the detailed teachings of Islam which does not prohibit a woman from seeking employment (provided she doesn’t neglect her responsibilities to her family). Indeed, the Prophet’s own wife Khadija was a wealthy merchant.

Iranian women have been fighting these contradictions and other injustices since the revolution. Iranian women had gained many concessions prior to the revolution and truly expected that those hard won gains would continue under an Islamic system. While many, if not most of those gains were lost, a great deal of women had nevertheless benefited from the increased educational opportunities that were made available prior to the revolution. This resulted in a generation of educated women that were unlikely to settle for anything less than a level of gender equality that was commiserate with their understanding of the modern world.

Consider, for example, that one in every five Ph.D. students in Iran is a woman. About 56% of all natural science university students are women. Indeed, well over 70% of engineering students in Iran are women. The Iranian government, while not pleased with these numbers, has realized that much of the nation’s intellectual capital is invested in women. In order to compete on a national stage in areas of technology, business and other areas, it is necessary to have the input and participation of women. This fact alone has been a means for women to push the gender equality platform, albeit slowly, at least in areas of employment opportunities.

What is clear is that there is a desire for Iranian women to embrace many of the freedoms that American baby boomers and others Western women enjoy. But it goes beyond just wanting western style comforts; rather it is a desire to embrace those basic and fundamental liberties that are inherent to success and happiness. American baby boomers have shown that equal participation of women in the social structure results in significant societal contributions. In order for Iran to progress to its stated hope of being on equal footing with other industrialized nations, it will need to capitalize on the full participation of its female citizens.

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

The Psychological Article on
Reflections of A Generation (pt. 5): Lifting the Veil – The Fight For Gender Equality in Iran
is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on World Religions, politics and understanding as a solution to types of discrimination. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Reflections of A Generation (pt.4): Behind the Veil – Women In Iran

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Iran Echo Boomers: Women Behind the Veil

Iran Echo Boomers: Women Behind the Veil

By Boomeryearbook.com

With the growing social unrest within the Islamic Republic of Iran, the Iranian government is facing a crossroads of its very existence. Young Iranian echo boomers (mirroring the socially active American baby boomers) are becoming increasingly vocal in their dissatisfaction with perceived social inequities. Chief among these concerns is the rights of women in the Islamic Republic. For now, they are looking toward their government as a means of change. How long, however, will it be before peaceful reformation gives way to forceful revolution?

Gender inequality is a social injustice with which American baby boomers are very familiar. It is certain that many baby boomers view the plight of Iranian women with a great deal of empathy. Iranian women, for their part, are well aware of the limitations they face and have been strong voices for change in their country. It is an ironic twist of fate that the plight of women in Iran actually witnessed significant gains under the previous oppressive regimes of the Shahs.

The Pahlavi government – which featured a line of Shahs from 1925 to 1979 – was a pro-western regime. Unfortunately for the Shah, Iranians were generally conservative Muslims who chaffed under the measures that were being advocated. The Shah was so unpopular, in fact, that virtually every rival faction in Iran was united to bring the government down and to establish an Islamic Republic. However, being a pro-west regime, the Pahlavi Shahs instituted a number of progressive reforms concerning women’s rights over the years.

In 1936, for example, Reza Shah passed a law that forbade women from wearing the hijab (head covering worn by Muslim women). Women also found themselves more involved in the workforce. Educational opportunities were opened up as well. Under the Pahlavi regimes, women rose to such posts as government ministers and even judges. In fact, Nobel Prize recipient Shirin Ebadi, was Iran’s first female judge. By 1963, Iran instituted universal suffrage and women were elected to parliament. American baby boomers, at the time, could have taken heart to some of the Iranian women advances.

Much of this hard won effort, however, would come to an end with the Islamic Revolution of 1979. Again, ironically, women played a very key role in the success of the revolution as they were instrumental in the mass demonstrations. Nevertheless, the problem is two fold. On the one hand, Islam as a religion has defined roles for men and women in certain aspects of daily life. On the other hand, Iran – like many other locales around the world – is a male dominated (some could say misogynistic) culture.

Dealing with the latter is less of a challenge than dealing with the former. Issues such as the weight of a woman’s testimony in court (2 women equals 1 man), mode of dress in public and inheritance guidelines are Qur’anic in nature. In other words, these are areas in which Muslims believe divine guidance has been given. For women to challenge these types of perceived restrictions is to challenge the religious foundations on which the state is formed. These types of challenges are generally met with firm resistance from the government.

However, in regards to measures that stem from cultural bias, Iranian women seem to have more flexibility. Employment opportunities fall into this category. Despite a high number of Iranian women enrolled in higher education (70% of engineering students, for example are women), employment opportunities are routinely denied. Thus the separation of the sexes hinders women in this endeavor.

Much in the same way American baby boomers brought attention and eventual resolution to gender inequality, so to must Iranian echo boomers. The Iranian government, for its part, must recognize the differences between true religious concerns and cultural biasness. Perhaps by relaxing many of the non-religious restraints, the Islamic Republic can begin establishing a constructive dialog for effective reformation for its citizens without compromising Islamic tenants.

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

This Psychological Article on Reflections of A Generation (pt.4): Behind the Veil – Women In Iranis part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on World Religions, politics and understanding as a solution to types of discrimination. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Reflections of A Generation (pt.3): The Islamic Republic of Iran –Fact or Fiction?

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Iranian Echo Boomer Reformers

Iranian Echo Boomer Reformers

American baby boomers are watching the events in the Islamic Republic of Iran with a keen interest. In the young Iranians, they see a kindred spirit of social activism. These young Iranian echo boomers, so called because they are mirrors of the reformist baby boomers, have taken their voices to the world stage. Their willingness to stand up and be heard has given their government pause. The Iranian government has long conveyed that freedom rings true in the Islamic Republic. Is this government a true republic willing to guarantee the rights and freedoms it espouses, or is it really just another totalitarian regime?

It should be noted – and this is an important note – that Iranian echo boomers are not fighting their government. Rather they are protesting their government’s resistance to proffer specific social freedoms. It is the opinion of this author that this is the legacy that American baby boomers have inspired. Iranian activists are not calling for a revolution to overthrow the government. This alludes to a hope and a belief among the Iranian people that their government is a viable instrument through which to effect change. This sentiment is one that was held by American baby boomers and ultimately proved to be true. Can the same be said of the Iranian system of government?

To answer this question, one has to evaluate the government system in question. Iran’s government is ostensibly a republic. It has elected representational bodies that legislates and administers the affairs of government based on Islamic principles. Indeed, there are three branches of government - executive, parliament, and judicial. There is even a national constitution that provides a conceptual foundation (Islamic) of national identity.

However, all of these branches of governments and the positions within them are subordinate to the office of the Supreme Leader. In fact, the Supreme Leader has a significant and influential hand in appointing (directly and indirectly) the officials who serve in the other branches of government – including the government body that selects and can remove the Supreme Leader: the Assembly of Experts. There have only been two Supreme Leaders since the Islamic revolution of 1979; the founder of the revolution himself, the deceased Ayatollah Khomeini and the current leader, Ali Khamenei. While the office of president is the highest elected office in the country, the president is also subordinate to the supreme leader.

While this system may seem foreign to American baby boomers and other Westerners, one has to remember the general mindset of Iranians. Most Iranians – at least up until the revolution, were conservative, religious minded, and generally had an unfavorable attitude towards the west. As Muslims, Iranians generally accept the concept of having a guardian (a single leader) who safeguarded the Islamic underpinnings of the budding Islamic state. Even today, Iranian echo boomers – whose parents ignited the Islamic revolution – don’t have a significant issue with this political structure. This is evident by the recent protest over the recent presidential elections. The protests are over a legitimate election process – not the legitimacy of the system itself.

Nevertheless, this is a time of opportunity for both the Iranian government and the Iranian people. The government has the chance to illustrate that it is a true republic in fact and not just name by listening to the voices of the people and taking significant resulting action. For the people, this is a chance for the protests to be heard as it is difficult for the government to silence the Iranian echo boomer reformers International media attention.

The government should remember that its own existence is the result of a disgruntled population that eventually lost all hope that the prevailing political system could effect positive change. The desire for reformation always precedes the need for revolution. There are real social issues, such as the rights of women that are at the forefront of concerns for Iranian echo boomers. These concerns need to be addressed by a receptive Iranian government while the people are still tolerant of the current political and social structure.

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

This Psychological Article on Reflections of A Generation (pt.3): The Islamic Republic of Iran –Fact or Fiction? is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on World Religions, politics and understanding as a solution to types of discrimination. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Reflections of A Generation (pt.2): Reformation Vs. Revolution In Iran

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Iranian Echo Boomer Reform Movement

Iranian Echo Boomer Reform Movement

 

 

Psychological Articles

By Boomeryearbook.com

There is a growing dissatisfaction among Iran’s large population of young adults. Some of this unrest exploded for the world to see with protests associated with the allegations of voter fraud with the recent presidential elections. As thousands of protestors took to the streets to voice their concerns (and the whole world watching on television), the Iranian government struggled to fashion a response that would quiet the crowds and not embarrass the regime. The current government is the result of a revolution itself – a popular uprising amongst the people at the time. Faced with eerily similar circumstances, the question is whether the current government faces a reformation or another revolution.

The difference between the two – in general terms – is significant. In this, there are lessons to learn from history. American baby boomers, for example, have defined the process of social reformation. The so-called counter-culture; baby boomers set out to redefine society in a mold that was in conformity with their understanding of the American dream. This redefinition, however, was to be accomplished within the scope of the established political framework. In other words, baby boomers wanted change but did not want to overthrow the established government.

Social revolution, however, is a different concept. A revolution identifies the problems that a society faces as inherent symptoms of a corrupt or failing government. In such a circumstance, the only viable solution is to effect regime change. Obviously, this wasn’t much of a consideration for American baby boomers. Ordinarily, such a decisive measure is costly in terms of human lives and infrastructure damage. Still, there are two points of interest that are derived from all of this.

The first is that in times of social unrest, the initial goal of the dissatisfied is reformation. Secondly, despite the constant chatter from talk shows and news pundits, it does not appear that the Iranians are not looking to overthrow their government. At this point in time (which is a key point for the Iranian government and its citizens) the call is for social reformation and not revolution. To better understand the significance of this and the lessons that should be well understood by the Iranian government if no one else, is illustrated in recent historical events.

The current Iranian government is the result of the Islamic (sometimes called Iranian) Revolution of 1979. Prior to the revolution, Iran was governed under a monarchy. It would suffice to say that history views this government as unpopular. Psychological articles inform us that the ruler of Iran, Shah Pahlavi, stood over a pro-western, liberal, and generally agreed upon, oppressive regime. A measure of the discontent in Iran with the Shah is that virtually each of the normally rival factions in Iran – religious, Marxist, leftist, etc. – all had one thing in common; a desire to see the Shah ousted.

Calls for social change and efforts for such (i.e. reformation) were often brutally suppressed by the Shah’s government.

Naturally, the widespread discontent eventually united the factions to action. Under the leadership of Ayatollah Khomeini, Iran witnessed staged protests of immense proportions. As one observer noted, there were more protesters than the secret police could ever hope to arrest. The Shah went into exile in 1979.

The lesson is that the Shah, recognizing the writing on the wall, finally attempted to enact many of the social changes that had been called for; only too late. Once revolutionary momentum has been attained, reformation is no longer an option. American baby boomers never had to face this dilemma - the Iranian government does. Now, Iranian officials have to weigh the choice of reformation or revolution in regards to its own continued existence.

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

This Psychological Article on Reflections of A Generation (pt. 2): A Mirror of Social Unrest In Iran Influenced by Baby Boomers? is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on World Religions, politics and understanding as a solution to types of discrimination. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Reflections of A Generation (pt. 1): A Mirror of Social Unrest In Iran: Influenced by Baby Boomers?

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

Iranian Echo Boomers: Mirrors of Baby Boomer Revolutionaries

 

Iranian Echo Boomers: Mirrors of Baby Boomer Reformers

 

 

By Boomeryearbook.com

 

Recent news headlines are awash with the political events that are taking place in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Perhaps at a glance, one might wonder why so much attention is being paid to the social unrest of a nation that is so distant to our own. A closer examination, however, reveals our fascination with witnessing social reformation. US Baby boomers especially, are keen to see the dynamics of change manifest in an environment much like the one that sparked their own counter-culture movement. Indeed, one could easily argue that the great experiment of the boomers has had a direct influence on the calls for social reformation that are now being heard in Iran. For certain, the issues that Iranian society is now struggling with (and the resulting unrest) mirror’s the boomers own fight against a prevailing social structure.

In fact, a closer look at the current social structure of Iranian society is not so different than the conservative landscape that shaped America in the 1950’s. America, prior to our own social reformation; was one of defined gender roles, a Judeo-Christian based morality standard, and a general resistance to any change that would disrupt the status quo. Iranian society could certainly be described in similar terms. Iranian society has definite ideas about the roles of men and women, it features an Islamic (which is to say religious) code of morality, and the government (including older generations) is resistant to any change to the system, especially by the present (which is to say younger) generation of citizens.

And it is this current generation of Iranian citizens that are becoming more restless with the current social structure and vocal in their dissatisfaction. This generation is young and very much in tune with the social dynamics both at home and abroad. Consider the fact that the median age of the 70 million people in Iran is 26 years of age. Further, an estimated ¼ of the population is under the age of 15. This younger generation of Iranians is better educated than their parents, and in this age of technology, they are very much aware of the more liberal (some would say progressive) social structures that make up many western nations.

Baby boomers are very familiar with this situation. They themselves stood at a similar crossroads. As America transitioned from the 1950’s to the 1960’s, there were many social issues that began to ferment unrest. Racial and gender inequality, participation in foreign wars, a negative perception of government policies, to name a few issues, resulted in baby boomers resorting to action. First there were the grass root information campaigns and voices being heard. This soon transformed into protests and political activism on a wide front.

By the 1970’s the counter-culture was in full swing. For baby boomers, it meant a continual drive to influence and drive the direction of society. This meant, on the one hand, to have a consistent and continual voice in the dynamics that formed the social structure. It also meant that their ideas had to have a platform, which turned out to be television, radio, movies, comics and other mediums. What we are seeing in Iran is a generation of Iranian activists who are taking a cue from their American counterparts, as well as their own parents who led the Islamic Revolution of 1979. Having the required education and communication resources has allowed for their own grassroots campaign to spread the idea of social change. Their voices have been heard. Again, using American baby boomers as a model, it seems that the second phase of reformation has begun – protests and political activism.

This Psychological Article on Reflections of A Generation (pt. 1): A Mirror of Social Unrest In Iran Influenced by Baby Boomers? is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on World Religions, politics and understanding as a solution to types of discrimination. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Boomer Yearbook is a Social Network and Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Gypsy Women:Psychological Articles on Types of Discrimination

Friday, March 27th, 2009

Gypsy Fortune Teller

Gypsy Fortune Teller


By Boomeryearbook.com

Gypsy is a term which was basically used for the Romanian people in the sixteenth century. In the present times it represents English people who live in freely, with few encumbrances, and while not specifically members of any traveling group, are still primarily nomadic. The birth of a child is a great event for them and they believe in having large families. Their art and literature is gripped with the notion of immortality. Gypsies typically are dark skinned people, are highly superstitious, and are believed to indulge in witchcraft. Psychological articles inform us that stealing, conniving and duplicitous behavior are stereotypical attributes that are frequently associated with Gypsies. Oftentimes Gypsies have been noted walking the streets for money, poorly clothed and dirty, and thus instilling the fear of being robbed in the minds of those they pass. Psychological articles report that mainstream people regard Gypsies as unwashed and unclean; taken food from public disposal areas, homeless and nomadic, and even training their children to beg.

While originally thought to have come from Romania, (i.e., some new speculation believes they originated in India) Gypsies are not primarily restricted to Romania. They are people on the move of any religion or cast who are nomadic. Banjaras, in India are considered Gypsies and are thought to have practices different from other Indian groups or residents. Also, there are the Sea Gypsies of South-East Asia, and numerous “travelers” in the US and other Western Countries.

Gypsies are notorious for being strange looking and oddly dressed, and are believed to be practicers of voodoo and other forms of witchcraft. When you enter a fortune teller’s house you typically find a Gypsy woman with tarot cards sitting in the middle of a room with a yellow lamp lit above her head. Over the centuries fortune telling and practices of magic has been associated with gypsies; and founded or not, Gypsies often find themselves as a focus of types of discrimination.

Most Americans view Gypsies as a little dangerous but nonetheless fun and exciting people, as Gypsies traditions are tinged with tribal color. A Gypsy woman wears a long colorful skirt with huge, heavy earrings, other dangling jewelry, and married women typically don a colorful head scarf. They also wear good luck charms and other items to warn off evil spirits. Their diet consists of whatever is available as they are always on the move.

Famous Gypsy Women:

From a more positive perspective, we must mention a few very famous Gypsies who have secured some excellent achievements in life and have a claim to fame. Some of the most prominent Gypsy women are:

• Micaela Flores Amaya, a Flamenco dancer. She grew up in Barcelona and became a dancer, cinema actress and painter.
• Rosa Taikon Janush whose jewelry designs are very popular in Sweden.
• Katarzyna Pollok from the Ukraine belongs to a tribe of Gypsies and is a famous painter and sculptor.
• From Austria, Ceija Stojka a great writer, who was the first Romanian to write a literary work about the Holocaust. She is a painter and a poetess too.
• From Russia, Olga Pankova, a writer and a poetess.
• Another Gypsy scientist from Russia is Sofia Vasilyevna Kovalevskaya, who was recognized as a genius in mathematics.
• Dunja Rajter is another successful Gypsy woman from Croatia who has become a lead actress and singer. Her most important work is the social support programs she ran for war affected children.

The Psychological Article on Gypsy Women is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on World Religions, Spirituality, and Solutions to Types of Discrimination. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Religious Symbols: One World Many Faiths

Religious Symbols: One World Many Faiths

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Basic Tenets of Judaism

Monday, March 23rd, 2009

Star of David

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination


By Boomeryearbook.com

Judaism is a religion often confused with a culture or with ethnicity. What Judaism refers to is a practice of faith based on the Torah, a holy book said to be written by Moses, the supreme prophet of Judaism. Judaism is different from other religions in that its focus is not so much on beliefs as it is on actions. Though originally established among the Jews (hence the name), anyone from any race can practice Judaism.

Judaism is a monotheist religion, this means that a belief in one God and worship that one God rather than several gods. It is about 3500 years old and boasts to be one of the world’s smallest religions having about only 12 million followers. Judaism is one of the world’s oldest religions and subscribes to the instructions given from the Written Torah, the Oral Torah given to Moses and laws contributed to by long-standing Rabbis.

Some Judaic precepts are:
• God exists
• God is one and unique.
• God is incorporeal (i.e. spiritual).
• The words of the prophets are true.
• All of God’s children are equal – male and female.
• The Sabbath (the seventh day of the week on the Jewish calendar, said to be Saturday or Sunday) must be respected. This means that all work is done in 6 days of week and then rest must be taken on the seventh day).
• Prayer is to be directed to God alone and no other.
• Peace is superior to war.
• God knows the thoughts and deeds of men.
• There will be no other Torah.
• God is eternal.
• Followers strive to make the world better by working with the earth (hence consuming only kosher foods).
• The written Torah and oral Torah were given to Moses.
• Moses’ prophecies are true and he was the greatest prophet.
• The Messiah will come.
• The dead will be resurrected.
• God will reward the good and punish the wicked.

Judaism asserts that relationships and actions are more important than cosmological consequences; therefore, the belief in heaven and hell varies among different practitioners; but all forms of Jews focus on obeying the 613 laws of the Torah and trying to be examples of love and virtue, along with a prominent Jewish tradition placed on the ritual of giving back to the community and the earth.*

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

The Psychological Article on An Introduction to Judaism is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on World Religions, Spirtuality, and Solutions to Types of Discrimination. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological Articles based-Informational Social Network Website for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join now to discover the many ways this Website for Baby Boomers is offering psychological articles as knowledge and hopeful solutions to Types of Discrimination.

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Taoism: An Introduction

Monday, March 23rd, 2009

Ying-Yang

Ying-Yang

Taoism

By Boomeryearbook.com

Psychological Articles as Solutions to Types of Discrimination

Taoism is a philosophy with religious offshoots that has evolved since 400 BC; and mingled with other traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, it’s had profound effects on East Asia. The literal meaning of Tao is ‘the way’ which defies definition and can only be experienced. The basic belief of Taoism is that a single force permeates the universe and living things called ‘Chi’ - balances in everything or between Yin and Yang- embodies the harmonious relationship between all opposites and is the basis for types of discrimination.

The founder of Taoism is believed to be Tao Tsi born in 604 BC. His book of teachings is called ‘Tao-te-Ching ‘The Book of the Way’ and was followed by his successor, Zhuangzi, centuries later. Both philosophers represent different strains of Taoism; similar to divisions in Greek thought between Plato and Aristotle. The basics, however, remain constant.

Tao believes that Tao is the force that permeates existence, and that each believer’s aim is to attune himself in spirit and person with Tao. Therefore enlightenment is achieved by listening, i.e. through introspection and meditation and through outward observation. God is also not a distant ephemeral reality but is expressed through many manifestations of God in human society; and yet, cannot be represented as an image or a thing. Development of harmony with Tao within oneself is a primary aim to achieve health and the attainment of virtue through the three jewels that are compassion, moderation and humility which discourages types of discrimination. Taoism stresses the importance of ‘Chi’ (breath/air) and the need to nurture it within, and ‘Wu Wei’ which is allowing nature to take its course. It also sees humanity in a positive light; as intrinsically good and compassionate if given freedom to choose any alternative.

The key to developing and experiencing Tao is to achieve yin and yang. Although seen and interpreted in different ways, the meaning and symbol of yin and yang represents opposite or polarized forces in nature. Its symbol is presented as black and white swirls twined around each other with a black dot in the white and vice versa. This symbolizes that opposites can mingle and are not always distinctly separate entities. Taoists believe that human intervention often upsets this balance in both nature (externally) and themselves (internally), and thus, health and vitality is caused by perfect harmony of ying and yang and imbalances within the person, cause illness. The Tao philosophy of Chi has medicinal applications such as acupuncture and herbal remedies, as well as use in healing manifestations of meditation and the physical discipline of Tai Chi balancing body and mind.

Taoism was initially a combination of philosophical concepts and psychology. It took on religious significance when it was adopted in 400 AD by the Chinese state and became one of the three religions of China; the other two being Buddhism and Confucianism. All three disciplines developed together, and the harmony and syncretism that evolved from these religions has shaped China and other countries for centuries to come. Taoism survived as a state entity until 1911 and the subsequent coming of Communist rule that unfortunately banned religion and opened the door fortypes of discrimination; Communism not only destroyed much physical heritage but disallowed religious practice. At present Taoism has approximately 20 million followers mostly centered in Taiwan with smaller numbers elsewhere. Many of modern cultures’ aspects like herbal medicine, martial arts and holistic medicine have been adopted from Taoist thought.

Religious Symbols: One World Many Faiths

Religious Symbols: One World Many Faiths

The Psychological Article on Taoism is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on World Religions, Spirituality, and Solutions to Types of Discrimination. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological Articles based Website for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and keep up with the latest advancements in medical and mental health.

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