Archive for the ‘Baby Boomer Games -Online Optical Illusions’ Category

Psychological Article: Types of Online Optical Illusions

Sunday, March 15th, 2009

Literal Online Optical Illusion: How many feet do you see?

Literal Online Optical Illusion: How many feet do you see>

By Boomeryearbook.com

Psychological articles tell us that Optical illusions, or misperceived sensory signals, are categorized into three main types. First are literal optical illusions which are images different from the objects which make them. Sometimes our brain focus on the figure or its background to prepare perceptions categorized as figure-ground illusions. Our mind often chooses to ignore what it wants in order to create meaning and beauty; hence it forms Typographical illusions by focusing on one detail at the expense of other.

Second are physiological illusions which are created by the effect of an excessive impression of a stimulus such as color, movement and brightness. A good example of this type is the afterimage made after the bright lights. The retina of the eye retains the strong impression of the intense stimulus long after it is gone or removed. But these images are not simply restricted to the retina’s role because there are motion aftereffects as well where people registering one direction of motion for some time may experience the illusion of opposite motion at the same time. This is usually experienced by people watching waterfalls and is therefore called waterfall illusion. It is commonly experienced by normal individuals in their day to day life and often young children are caught wondering about it.

Cognitive Illusion: Square A and B are identical shades of gray.

Physiological Illusion: Square A and B are identical shades of gray.

The third type of optical illusions is the cognitive illusions in which the brain and eye make bizarre inferences. These are a result of beliefs and assumptions about one’s surroundings and the world. Cognitive illusions are an attempt by our brain to organize sensations into something more meaningful. In order to do so, the brain figures out possible and probable matches to existing conscious and sub conscious stimuli and compares to stored cognitions in order to formulate reasonable explanations of perceptions. This organization is possible when the brain sensory system perceives the stimuli as a meaningful whole, or what psychological articles refer to as a Gestalt.

Cognitive Optical Illusion

Cognitive Optical Illusion

Cognitive illusions further branch out as Ambiguous illusions, which psychological articles explain are ways our brains encourage alternative interpretations of visual stimuli, while distorting illusions involves distortion of shape and size occurring because of conflicting images, Paradox illusions occur because of paradoxical cognitive impressions, and Fictional illusions are those which are perceived by only one person ad thus are usually referred to as hallucinations.

Cognitive illusions can also be based on the human ability to view 2 dimensional drawings in the depth of three dimensions. Similarly, movement illusions can occur, for instance, when we are riding a bike and things in our surroundings will appear to move, although they are stationary. This movement perception is caused by a chain of sensory illusions resulting from motion.

Another interesting fact about cognitive optical illusions is that the color and brightness constancy impacts the perception so much that it identifies the color as it is regardless of the amount of light. All these various types of illusions are experienced by adults and children in routine life and are a part of the normal human range of experience. However, psychological articles suggest that regular viewing of online optical illusions challenges and teases our brains and has a beneficial and stimulating effect!

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological Articles-Informational Social Network Website for Baby Boomers and baby boomer generation! Create Boomer Yearbook Profile, Connect with old and new Baby Boomers, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join this website for baby boomers, stay informed, and let your opinions be heard.

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Creating Online Optical Illusions

Sunday, March 15th, 2009

Online Optical Illusions: Are these true squares?

Online Optical Illusions: Are these true squares?


By Boomeryearbook.com

Optical illusions can be a lot of fun. They can serve to test intelligence, measure differences of perception and also to understand how different minds work and respond to the same stimulus. Optical illusions can both be easy and difficult to make. One must keep in mind the purpose; get all essential resources, a fine place to work in and a fine well-defined plan.

One easy way of making an optical illusion is through marker drawing. All one has to do is to draw shapes within shapes with the chosen markers of selected colors. When we draw shapes within shapes the images will be there but they will become somewhat difficult to spot. This is where the fun of it lies! To make an optical illusion drawing you will need a drawing paper and markers. Whichever shapes you intend to draw keep your mind clear about your selection. And here’s a tip; it is advisable to draw shapes which allow more and smoother drawing in a flow without breaks. This will help create a more effective illusion. Draw one sketch of the selected shapes and then instead of filling these shapes up with color just keep drawing continuous lines in similar shape to fill the entire area. One idea is to write a familiar word and keep outlining it till it forms a complex shape.

Another interesting optical illusion can be made with colors. You can choose a paper plate and divide the area into three layers of triangles. Each layer must have a combination color scheme. Use a compass to draw circles for triangle layers. In the middle make two tiny holes with a paper puncher and insert light weight 26 to 30 inch piece of string, thread it through the two holes and then tie it carefully in a loop. Color your neatly drawn triangles with different poster paints. Remember to use primary colors such as red, blue and yellow with bold strokes of black. Hold the strings taut, then twist or spin them several times to see the magic of colors. You will see the colors blending and expanding as they spin. They will be creating some lovely new colors for you to see and appreciate.

Optical illusions help make great brain teaser art. Confused faulty perception poses challenges for the observer and is entertaining and stimulating. One comfortable way of making a brain teaser is to use a stencil to draw geometric designs on a drawing paper. You can draw grapes or a moth with a lot of circles. Draw circles within circles and use different colored markers to make it even more challenging. Keep a good count of the shapes you draw. Once you are done, ask a friend to count the shapes. It’s an easy bet that your friend will be stumped and fascinated by optical illusions created by background figures and shapes.

Boomer Yearbook
is a Psychological Articles-Informational Social Network Website for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join now to discover the many ways this Website for Baby Boomers can keep you informed and contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness.

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Word Brain Teaser Explained

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009

Brain Word Games

Brain Word Games

By Boomeryearbook.com

See if you can read the paragraph below. You might be surprised to find that you actually can read it even though it looks like a bunch of jumbled gibberish.

Olny srmat poelpe can raed tihs. I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn’t mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Amzanig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt! if you can raed tihs psas it on!!

Practice makes perfect

Practice makes perfect

So how does this happen? Well, according to the paragraph itself, the mind reads a word as a whole so it doesn’t matter if the letters are out of order as long as the first and last letters of a word are in the right place. However, this task is probably more easily accomplished by people who habitually read. The more often you read, the faster your mind can process the words you are reading. Most likely, your mind recognizes words that are used on a regular basis more quickly, even if the letters are in the wrong order. Did you notice any words that took you slightly longer to figure out? Or did you read straight through without any hesitation?

It might also help if you are good at playing the word games or riddles that require you to unscramble the letters. Have you ever noticed that some people seem to just look at a scrambled word and can instantly know what the correct word is supposed to be? It seems unfair, doesn’t it? If you’re not one of those people you probably had a bit of difficulty reading the above paragraph. However, it doesn’t necessarily mean that not smart. The mind is a funny thing and everyone processes things differently and at different rates.

Boomer Yearbook, a free social networking site for the baby boomers or those concerned with the elderly problems of the baby boomers generation, is based on the vision that the baby boomers want to connect and reconnect, but in our own way and on our own terms.

As a clinical psychologist, Dr. Karen Turner provides free psychological articles on dream analysis, coaching, self-help, online Optical Illusions and brain teasers to ward off senior moments, depression, and dementia, the latest news on cosmetic enhancements and weekly updates on mental and medical wellness. Join now to discover the many ways in which this website for baby boomers can contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness.

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Magic Circle Moving Optical Illusion

Sunday, March 1st, 2009

Magic Circle Optical Illusion- All Psych

Magic Circle Optical Illusion- All Psych

By Boomeryearbook.com

Optical or visual illusions often occur when our visual field gives us false or deceptive interpretations of an object or image. Optical illusions can be scientifically or artistically created or can soemtimes occur naturally as a result of our visual field giving two dimensional images a three-dimensional interpretation.

Acording to a psychological article in All Psych, this “Magic Circle” optical illusion results from our eyes (visual perceptual sense) being tricked into projecting movement onto a static object.

Do you see it moving? If not, keep trying.

As cited in Boomer Yearbook’s “Riddle me this-Good for you Gaming”
http://boomeryearbook.com/blog/2008/10/24/riddle-me-this-good-for-you-gaming/
optical illlusions and brain teasers challenge our brains, helping to keep them healthy and active, thus improving our vision, shortening surgical recovery time, and even helping with pain management.

So Boomers! Game On. It’s fun and good for you.

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological-Informational Social Network Website for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join now to discover the many ways this website for baby boomers can contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness.

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Rose Optical Illusion

Sunday, March 1st, 2009

Optical Illusion-Naturally Occurring

Optical Illusion-Naturally Occurring

This is an example of a natrually occurring optical (visual) illusion. It is a real picture taken on a gorgeous sunny day on a sandy beach. At first glance this looks like just a beautiful rose. But keep looking and see if you can find the hidden picture inside the rose.

Have you found it? Here’s a hint. It is an ocean creature.

Answer:

Still can’t see it? Check around the center middle top of the rose and you will see a swimming dolphin.

Are you still having trouble finding the hidden image? As in many things in life, practice makes perfect, and we at Boomer Yearbook hope you will check out our many Online Optical Illusions and Brain Teasers. Enjoy!

Boomer Yearbook is a Psychological-Informational Social Network Website for Baby Boomers, Echo Boomers and Booming Seniors. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join now to discover the many ways this website for boomers can contribute to optimal physical and emotional wellness.

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HOW SMART IS YOUR RIGHT FOOT?

Monday, February 2nd, 2009

Isodirectional/Non Isodirectional Psychological Article

Isodirectional/Non Isodirectional Psychological Article

HOW SMART IS YOUR RIGHT FOOT?

You have to try this please, it takes
2 seconds. I could not believe this!
It is from an orthopedic surgeon.

This will boggle your mind and you will
keep trying over and over again to see
if you can outsmart your foot,
but, you can’t.

It’s pre-programmed in your brain!

1. Without anyone watching you
(they will think you are GOOFY….)
and while sitting at your desk in
front of your computer, lift your
right foot off the floor and make
clockwise circles.

2. Now, while doing this, draw the
number ‘6′ in the air with your right
hand. Your foot will change direction.

I told you so!!! And there’s nothing you
can do about it! You and I both know how
stupid it is, but before the day is done
you are going to try it again, if you’ve
not already done so.

Psychological Articles Explaining Brain Coordination

by BoomerYearbook.com

A silly little trick has been circulating throughout the cyber world for some time, similar to trying to pat your head and rub your stomach, but this one involves the coordinating movements of your hands and feet. The foot trick goes something like this: While sitting upright in a chair, lift your right foot off the floor and make clockwise circles. Then, while making clockwise circles with your right foot, draw the number 6 in the air with your right hand. The catch is to try to keep your right foot moving in a clockwise direction while drawing the ‘6’ in the air. It is very difficult, if not impossible for some. So, what’s the deal? Read on. This psychological article will explain.

There is a plausible explanation for the challenge to move your foot in a clockwise direction while making a counter-clockwise motion with your hand. The difficulty is not limited to hand/foot coordination. Try this other little muscle coordination test (this one is off the cuff): hold both arms out in front of you, bent at the elbow (hand should be pointed up, palms facing one another). First, move your right arm in forward circle. Once you have your right arm moving forward, move your left arm in backward circles simultaneously. Can you do it? Accurately? Keeping your movements in circles? (Yeah, right. No one was looking as you were reading this psychological article explanation, so who is going to challenge you?)

If you cannot, no matter how hard you try, make your arms and legs move in opposite directions you are not alone. According to a psychological article by David Rosenbaum, Penn State University, published in November/December Journal of Experimental Psychology, your brain is programmed a certain way. The psychological article explains that the brain is the sophisticated wiring that controls our muscle movements. Because of how we are programmed, the brain naturally has more trouble coordinating movements that are in different directions, or non-isodirectional. Why? you ask. Give that question some thought. Do you more often need to use your limbs in conjunction with one another or in contradiction to one another? Here are a few activities that you may have participated in recently, or at least observed, that will demonstrate coordinated muscle movements: 1) riding a bicycle. Do your legs move in the same direction or opposite directions? If they moved in opposite directions you would never move from square one; 2) swinging a bat. Both arms must move together; 3) folding clothes. The actions are mirror images, but are still in the same direction. Also, do not confuse ‘opposite’ with ‘alternating’. Although some of our movements may alternate, they are still in the same direction. It came on our respective mental hard-drives, luckily.

And why does all of this matter? There have been numerous psychological articles that have reported studies that tested the effects of stroke on motor coordination. The general consensus is that non-isodirectional movements are difficult under normal circumstances. For stroke patients, both isodirectional and non-isodirectional movements are compromised not only on the lesioned brain hemisphere but also on the “unaffected” hemisphere. The conclusion is that both the left and right hemispheres are needed for coordinated muscle movements. When a person suffers a stroke, regardless of the side in which the stroke occurred, the synchronization of motor control movements is negatively affected.

Isodirectional Brain-from article by Deric Bownds

Isodirectional Brain-from article by Deric Bownds

What did this first in Boomer Yearbook’s series of psychological articles help you discover about your own abilities to move your limbs in opposite directions? Are you the exception or the rule? Tell us how your own tests turned out on BoomerYearbook.com.

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www.boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with psychological articles and brain games provided by clinical psychologist, Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping the Baby Boomers connect for fun and profit.

Optical Illusions: Perception, Observation, and Imagination

Wednesday, December 24th, 2008

by BoomerYearbook.com

At some point in our lives, all of us have encountered the phenomenon of optical illusions and many of us have wondered exactly what is it that causes these varying perceptions. In 1992, Matthew Luckiesh in his book “Visual Illusions: Their Causes, Characteristics and Applications”, illuminated three main causative factors in optical illusions; perception, imagination, and observation. While most of us possess an imagination, some of us are blessed with being able to imagine in intricate multifaceted dimensional ways whereas others are more concrete and conservative imaginers. Aside from the powers of imagination, individuals also are unique in their abilities to observe and perceive. As Luckiesh said, “only part of what is perceived comes through the senses from the object. The remainder always comes from within.”

Thus if an individual were to take a look at the four above pictures, they would “see” these objects from their unique viewpoint of subjective Imagination, Observation and Perception.

It’s a neat little exercise that you can try with your friends. It doesn’t mean you should try and analyze their answers. It’s meant to be a fun exercise just to show that a picture is truly worth a thousand words, and there is a great deal of grey area when we talk about “objective” perception.

Now if these pictures were put in front of me for example and I had to use my imagination; this is what I would have come up with.

In picture one I would imagine this as being a music stand to hold sheet music. The arrow would be just as it seems a simple arrow. Bet you can guess right off the top I don’t have a vivid imagination. With the second picture, I would have to say the writing gives away the picture but you had to admit it looks more like a tree than a bush, while at least to me. I really had to study picture three to determine that it looked like a birds head. Number four was intriguing in that it had no beginning or an end.

Now if we move on to the observation part of this exercise how many can honestly say they noticed the background. If you were to place your hand over the picture do you really think you would recall the background colors? Interestingly some people would whereas others won’t.

From my personal subjective point of view, I found the pictures mundane and unexciting. Can you guess that I am not an artist or architect, and alas, not even a particularly creative imaginer? However, when comparing notes with my co-worker, she was able to create wonderful three dimensional possibilities and could study the pictures for the smallest of clues. Ah, but she is a gestalt psychologist and told me that the reason I could not see a beginning or end to picture number four is that our minds create a “completeness” and fill in perceptual blanks. Personally, I found picture number four to be most interesting…Hmm. Wonder what that says about me?

Carrying out an exercise such as I have outlined here is for entertainment purposes only. It can be fascinating to hear the perceptions from a group of friends than just singly looking at the illusions.

If there were anything to be learned from this exercise of comparing viewpoints on optical illusions it’s to recognize just how differently individuals perceive any situation. It’s always interesting to note how several people can look at one situation yet all take something different from its context.

You could even go a step further with this exercise and ask each person to make up a story about the picture. Then you will be in for some real fun. Or if you are the more scholarly type, you can read more on the psychological study of perception or the philosophical understanding of epistemology (study of human knowledge), or you can join boomer yearbook and hear what others have to say.


www.boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.

The Spinning Girl Explained by Boomeryeabook.com

Wednesday, December 10th, 2008

The Spinning Girl Explained by Boomeryeabook.com

The Spinning Girl Explained by Boomeryeabook.com

by BoomerYearbook.com

Ah, the ever mysterious spinning girl. You see her spinning one way initially, and you know that you can see her spinning the other if you try. So you do. And you try, and try and try. Some people get to see her spin the other way around almost easily. Some people take a couple of minutes or tries before finally succeeding. And once you do get a hang of seeing her turn around one way and then the other – it’s really fun. Makes you wonder if it’s really your brain and your eyes, or just the computer playing tricks at you. Two people can be looking at the illusion the same time and see her spinning different ways. So if she happens to spin both ways at the same time – how does the spinning girl work? And how can you make her shift from one direction to the other?

Well, to make things a bit clear, the spinning girl is not really an image of a spinning girl, nor is it a big virtual hoax (a big surprise there, eh?). The spinning girl is a 2D image of a girl simply shifting back and forth. But as human beings, we see things in 3D because our brains are not made to interpret two dimensional representations. Since the spinning girl is an image of two dimensional nature, our brain processes this piece of visual information the best way it possibly can. And because our visual systems have been evolved to create assumptions for things they cannot interpret – it may be bound to create something near true, or create a false construction, which explains the case of optical illusions, one example of which is this. So, with the case of the spinning girl, our visual systems automatically assume that we are seeing a three dimentional image of a girl spinning either clockwise or counter – clockwise! This explains why we see a spinning image.

And once you do get a hang of seeing the image spin in one direction, simply focusing on the image’s shadow, feet or around the image may force your visual system to recreate the image. By this, you may be able to see the image spinning in the opposite direction.

Sounds fun, right? For other optical illusions, visit boomeryearbook.com! Meet other boomers and (as my old psychology teacher used to say), tickle your brain!

www.boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.

Riddle Me This: Good-For-You-Gaming

Friday, October 24th, 2008

post1.jpg

See if you can answer this riddle:

What fun activity can you participate in while lounging in your pajamas that also relieves stress, reduces pain, delays mental decline and can make you a better surgeon?

The answer is playing games, and if you solved this riddle it is probably because you already classify as an avid game player.

The benefits linked to game playing have been confirmed in multiple studies led by credentialed researchers from a variety of medical specialties. If you think I’m pulling your leg, look below for a couple of examples:

 

A study led by Dr. Robert S. Wilson that was published in the February 13, 2002 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association found that people who engaged more frequently in brain-challenging activities were less likely to develop Alzheimer’s Disease. The study also listed playing games and solving puzzles among the list of beneficial cognitive challenges. Go HERE to read the entire JAMA publication.

A March 19, 2007 article on Forbes.com entitled “Gaming’s Health Benefits” includes the results from several studies that linked game playing to a variety of benefits, including pain management, fewer surgical errors, and even sharper eyesight. You can read the entire article HERE.

All of these studies linking mental health benefits to playing games means a win/win situation for you, because while participating in a fun activity you are also giving your brain a boost. Best of all is that whether you prefer brain teasers, board games, puzzles, or Pac-Man, every single type of game is linked to at least one brain benefit. Be warned, though, Boomers – six hours of PlayStation every day won’t help you to ward off dementia. It’s brain teasers such as the optical illusions and psychological games found on Boomer Yearbook that will keep your brain at its best well into your Golden Years. Now that you know where to find these games, there’s only one thing left to say: Game on!

Intrigued by the research linking game playing to brain benefits? Puzzle it over at Boomer Yearbook.

It’s Just Fun

Tuesday, February 5th, 2008

Courtney and Lindsay
Arguably, the most famous optical illusion in existence. Do you see a young lady or an old woman?