Archive for July, 2009

Exercising the Elderly Mind

Monday, July 13th, 2009

Exercising to Avoid Elderly Problems

Exercising to Avoid Elderly Problems

By Boomeryearbook.com

Elderly minds, just like elderly bodies, vary from person to person. Not all elderly minds exhibit the symptoms of elderly problems. The frailest elderly people can shock the socks off those who deal with them on a daily basis by grasping ideas and concepts with razor sharp alacrity. Contrarily, another elderly person might have all the muscle tone of someone thirty years younger but little mental agility to compliment their physical capabilities.

It is perhaps one of life’s little practical jokes that the human mind sometimes deteriorates at a slower – or even a faster – rate than the body. Elderly problems manifest themselves in combinations, making individual treatment a matter of individual assessment. And so it should be. Human beings are a complex bunch and no two are the same, we are assured. If they were, they would be a boring set of critters, albeit with all the same elderly problems and related nuisances!

Exercising the mind in the elderly need not be the kind of project requiring a towel around the neck and a bottle of Bourbon before you can even consider what to do next. Elderly problems, especially those of the mind, do not hit the population with the force of a meteorite collision. Such things appear in a gentle mist of forgetfulness, each day filled with more absent mindedness than the last, until the person is beset by all the practical obstacles caused by their inability to think clearly. Independence slowly fades away and elderly problems triumph, leaving the elderly victim confused and condemned to living a dependant old age.

With the possible exception of those suffering the onset of diseases widely associated with the elderly, such as Alzheimer’s Syndrome, the older mind can be encouraged to stay alert long into advanced old age simply by exercising brain cells on a regular basis. Elderly problems may be minimized and sometimes entirely eradicated by keeping the mind functioning in a productive manner. Elderly problems such as forgetfulness, confusion and losing a grip on reality can all be kept at bay simply by doing daily crosswords or puzzles, exercising the brain by completing aptitude exercises on handy electronic games, playing Scrabble or Poker and being generally sociable within peer groups.

Activities that have a hand-to-brain function are even more valuable, such as knitting, sewing, model building and painting, requiring a compatibility of faculties to keep cells both physical and mental on their toes and in ship shape condition.

Slowness and inactivity need not be a feature of old age. Vigilance and frequent activity can lead those who anticipate elderly problems into a confident and enjoyable old age without any of the inherent difficulties. An optimistic program of care combined with a determination to enjoy life can achieve wonders.

The Psychological Article on Exercising the Elderly Mind is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing coaching series of suggestions to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Journaling for Elderly Problems

Monday, July 13th, 2009

Journaling to Alleviate Elderly Problems

Journaling to Alleviate Elderly Problems

By Boomeryearbook.com

Psychological comparisons for the elderly or for those trying to fight off the effects of elderly problems can be helpful when looking for a program of stimulation.  Physical and mental agility is imperative to combat the uglier symptoms of elderly problems, especially those that affect a person’s ability to function within a family unit or socialize in general.

Boomers are an inquisitive set: not content with sitting around and waiting for extreme old age and elderly problems to remove life’s enjoyments one by one, boomers are more likely to ask WHY they can’t remember to switch off the television, or WHY hands no longer listen to brain when making a three point turn.

To identify some of the problems that might rear their ugly heads in later life, it is sensible to instigate a gentle program of assessment to prevent elderly problems taking too strong a grasp too early in the game. 

Ask yourself whether you can still manage the coordination exercises you played around with in your teens.  No?  Make a note of it.  Do you enter a room and then stand around wondering why?  Write it down and also write down how often.  Make a note of how often in the course of a week you join friends for a game of cards or a fund raising quiz or for a walk in the park.  If your weekly interaction with friends is less than weekly, make a note of it and also make an effort to change things.  Elderly problems sneak up when you least expect them to but there is no need to hold the door open.

When you have finished writing about yourself and making rude remarks in the margins, take an honest look at just how much of your life is spent in actively using your brain and your body to keep yourself young, alert, happy and free of the elderly problems that beset the less vigilant victims of old age.

Stimulation comes in the form of having fun.  The days when you went surfing or hang gliding to perk up your cells might be over but you could always try ballroom dancing, casino evenings and dinner clubs to ward off senility, early dementia and any other nasty old thing you can think of associated with elderly problems and having your life run for you because you are too worn out to run it yourself.

The price of complacency is high for those who are horrified at the thought of elderly problems blighting their lives and turning old age into a death sentence.  There is no need for it and no need for you to sign off on it.  Get your pen and paper and start a program of self comparison.  Make a start.  Make a life.  

The Psychological Article on Journaling for Psychological Comparisons of Elderly Boomers is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of suggestions on coaching and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Dependency Between Elderly Partners

Monday, July 13th, 2009

Can't Live Without You: Co-Dependency in Elderly Couples

Can't Live Without You: Co-Dependency in Elderly Couples


By Boomeryearbook.com

Dependency can be a king pin in an elderly relationship, especially one that has been established for many years. Elderly problems may be experienced by elderly partners both individually and as a couple, as a result of the deep rapport that exists between them.

‘So what is wrong with long term devotion?’ You may well ask. Absolutely nothing is wrong with a long serving and loving relationship that mutually benefits two elderly people. However, extreme dependency can lead to elderly problems in one or both partners as a result of their long term reliance on each other.

In cases where the individuals are of a similar age, elderly problems are likely to be easier to deal with. Where one of the partners is very much older, the younger will often experience enormous pitfalls when trying to adjust to a life without the other in the event of death or serious illness.

Lengthy partnerships or marriages of forty or fifty years are usually deemed to be highly successful, simply by virtue of survival! Some people cannot imagine spending an entire lifetime with one partner. As extremely long partnerships continue into the sixty year bracket, living a single life must be unimaginable for both parties and when it becomes necessary through death or illness, elderly problems result.

In traditional marriages, either the husband or the wife takes responsibility for carrying out tasks such as household accounts, getting the car serviced, making tax returns, and so on. Left to tackle such things alone, a bereaved partner struggles against a mountain of difficulties and related elderly problems that are a direct result of being dependent upon a long term personal relationship.

The solution to such elderly problems is hard to define, as elderly couples often see no reason to change their lifetime habits. Why would they? Gentle encouragement might be shown to exercise a little independence, however, as a safeguard against a lonely and frightening situation to come, where grief and isolation are aggravated by not being able to deal with day to day routines previously handled by a partner now departed.

Elderly couples sometimes share a devotion rarely found in modern relationships and often this devotion itself becomes an emotional support for individuals experiencing elderly problems. While the other partner is safely resident within the relationship, all is well: the loss of this relationship can send a perfectly balanced and grounded elderly person into a tailspin when they are required to survive alone in a world they no longer recognize or feel comfortable in.

Dependency between elderly couples is a plus while both partners are still living and free of elderly problems but a little self sufficiency does not go amiss to allow for future isolation.

This Psychological Article on Dependency Between Elderly Partners is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of coaching suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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The Psychology of Attention Seeking in the Elderly

Monday, July 13th, 2009

Attention Seeking in the Elderly

Attention Seeking in the Elderly


By Boomeryearbook.com

The elderly have an inherent gift for turning minor elderly problems into major dramas when they feel the occasion warrants a little attention seeking. Just as children will seek attention from a parent intent on ignoring them, the elderly will turn cartwheels (figuratively speaking of course) to feature as the main attraction, usually when you least desire to be attracted!

Attention seeking is a symptom of a greater need. Old age can be tough and sometimes elderly problems wash over the most confident and sunny disposition, rendering a person vulnerable and susceptible to loneliness. This is when an elderly friend of relative is likely to seek your attention, as this is when your attention is most needed: it’s as simple as that.

An unfortunate feature of attention seeking behaviour is that it is not always important to seek attention of a particular quality – any attention will do! As a result, the behaviour which is designed to draw attention can sometimes be embarrassing and unwelcome; the worst kind of elderly problem.

The elderly do not seek attention simply to cause inconvenience to loved ones and friends. Such antics are usually only employed as a last resort and likely after a prolonged period of isolation or loneliness. Elderly problems come in a variety of packages and coming to terms with solitude and isolation is something few people tackle successfully in advanced old age or even much earlier.

Most caring professionals who deal with elderly problems on a daily basis deal with attention seeking behaviour firmly but gently. There is nothing to be gained in reacting angrily to situations where compassion and friendliness bring better results.

For those who seek attention and those who strive to provide attention to the seeker, the advice is the same – activity and social interaction. Keeping the brain alive and the body active is the only answer to the kind of loneliness and solitude that prompts such elderly problems; that and making such activities available on a continued program, on a regular basis.

The antidote to attention seeking is attention itself. The lack of interaction with others is the worm that eats away a person’s sociability, making them a target for all kinds of dysfunctional attitudes and elderly problems.

For elderly people who are wheelchair bound or unable to attend formal groups, a provided companion will stave off the symptoms of isolation sufficiently to eradicate attention seeking behaviour and its related elderly problems. There is no need for the elderly to run marathons and take degrees in applied science to achieve a sense of worth and freedom: stimulation may be just as easily acquired by an hour’s socializing with a good friend by your side.

This Psychological Article on The Psychology of Attention Seeking in the Elderly is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of suggestions on coaching and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Elderly Problems and How to Address Them in a Parent

Monday, July 13th, 2009

Psychological Article on Coaching Tips for Elderly Problems

Psychological Article on Coaching Tips for Elderly Problems

By Boomeryearbook.com

An unfortunate drawback of entering late middle age is that one’s parents may be entering advanced old age, possibly experiencing elderly problems and generally being higher maintenance than one welcomes in later life.

There are elderly problems associated with physical limitations, mental impairment and social behaviour that we will all have to deal with at some time. Nobody is spared the ageing process, no matter how wealthy, how intelligent or how determined they are to stem the onset of the golden years.

When you reach your fifties and sixties, the antics of an elderly parent can turn your world completely topsy-turvy and transform daily routine or family outings into a battleground. Elderly problems in those of advanced years differ radically from the mild, ‘senior’ annoyances associated with approaching old age. Eighty and ninety year olds can be more exhausting than children but need not necessarily affect the family unit as deeply as you think.

Elderly problems may often take the form of rebellious behaviour. In that case, the very best way to tackle difficulties is with an air of pervading calm to dispel hysteria and tantrums. Confrontational statements should be avoided when dealing with extreme elderly problems, as any authoritative behaviour may be translated as ‘disrespectful’. At all cost it is important to retain an air of respect and affection, especially when dealing with parents displaying the symptoms of elderly problems. There is nothing more demeaning than being bossed around by Junior; even if Junior is nearly seventy!

While many elderly problems require younger carers to ‘take over’, some lend themselves to ‘self fixing’ procedures. Elderly hands may sometimes move slowly but they do, nonetheless still move. It is far better to allow your elderly parent to change a light bulb if he or she is still able to do so, rather than rush to take the initiative before you have ascertained a need for help. Try to think whether you would welcome such help in their shoes and whether that help is more likely to be seen as ‘interference’.

Allowing an elderly parent some level of independence, wherever possible, is important. As the brain enters extreme old age, the more stimulation it receives the better. Taking control of small day to day tasks as a matter of routine will help your elderly parent maintain dignity and a sense of worth which might otherwise become impaired by relying on others completely.

Elderly problems need not intrude on your elderly parent’s ability to interact with the rest of the family and enjoy life.

This Psychological Article on Elderly Problems and How to Address Them in a Parent is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of suggestions on coaching to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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