Archive for April, 2009

Co-Dependency: A Relationship Addiction Psychological Articles by Boomeryearbook.com

Sunday, April 26th, 2009

Psychological articles show that normal relationships have a balanced level of healthy dependence but ‘relationship addiction’ connotes unhealthy dependency which can have a bad influence on both parties. Such relationships can cause serious problems among people and require effective co-dependency counseling.

Defining Co-dependency

When two people in a relationship become inextricable and extremely dependent on each other then you are witnessing co-dependency. Drugs, behavior problems and destructive habits of one person can influence the other person in a relationship to a great extent so that they start controlling each other. Psychological articles describe this co-dependency in terms of obsessive-compulsive behavior; as the co-dependent participants have become so intertwined that they have lost their individual freedoms.

Psychological articles warn that co-dependence brings fear, obsession and distrust. The victims of this disorder are helpless as they feel the compulsion to look after the other person in the relationship. Co-dependents display total dependence on the other person which if combined with a need for approval might goes as far as to take them towards insanity or irrational behavior. Co-dependents sacrifice their own lives, tastes, likes, and preferences to those of their partner, and will go to any length to preserve the relationship. Psychological articles inform us that the co-dependent’s fear of rejection and loss perpetuates the unhealthy relationship and sabotages belief systems as the co-dependent is so fearful of being alone, the dependent relationship tricks him/her into believing they are happy in the dysfunctional situation.

Remedies for Co-dependency

Oftentimes, psychological articles state that people in need of treatment for co-dependency or relationship-addiction also show co-committent problems such as eating disorders or drug addiction. Co-dependency resembles alcoholism and drug addiction in many ways. It has obsessive compulsive tendencies and generates uncontrollable behavior that can lead to disastrous consequences. But there are also great treatments available and co-dependents can resolve these destructive issues in “codependent programs of recovery’ which are comprised of teaching self importance, self reliance, and independent decision making.

Co-dependency treatment oftentimes becomes recognized and undertaken when the dependent partner is treated for alcohol, substance, or other addictive behavior. Yet, psychological articles alert us to the possibility that an addictive personality can be hard to cure and to be on the lookout that the person doesn’t cease one destructive behavior, such as alcoholism, only to find refuge in a dependent relationship. For instance, many psychological articles alert us to the fact that some people may seek refuge in co-dependency when they feel their other addiction is too over powering to be controlled. strongly argue that if a co-dependent want to recover, he/she will have to be separated from the person they are dependent on because they feel compelled in their addiction. Yet often the problem is rooted in the co-dependent and not in the other “dependent” person. Ultimately it can and should be done, but is not often easy to separate the dysfunctional dependent partners and allow them to grow to individual autonomous people.

Psychological articles reveal that what needs to change is the behavior- as the compulsive behavior is the real addiction. Once the co-dependent is empowered to control his destructive actions, other issues can be resolved through therapy and co-dependency counseling.

There are many effective co-dependent therapies such as individual or group treatment options. Psychological articles reveal that a particularly effective recovery program is based on the Twelve Steps; including daily meetings for the co-dependent and working with an experienced sponsor. For rapid recovery, psychological articles state that is it crucial to teach the co-dependent self-love, self-reliance, and self-respect. Healthy eating, exercise and adopting a healthy lifestyle will also facilitate recovery. Co-dependency might also cause a dependent to give up their life for the other, therefore, treatment and a better lifestyle is needed to help co-dependents control the addiction and become a healthy person autonomous individual.

The Psychological Article on Co-Dependency is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of coaching articles and suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Co-dependent Parents Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems By Boomeryearbook.com

Sunday, April 26th, 2009

The vast majority of parents love taking care of their children, and appropriately, most of these parents are equally willing to retire from parental authority once their child has grown into adulthood. However, psychological articles show that co-dependent parents are not part of the vast majority of parents willing to relinquish control. Instead, co-dependent parents find it terribly hard to let go of parenting responsibilities and authoritarian power and continue treating their adult child as “their little baby”. Co-dependent parents of adult children thus relish having their child dependent on them for solutions to problems as well as life choices.

Co-dependent parents show extreme care and love, to such a high degree, that it becomes intrusive, demeaning and makes their child uncomfortable and insecure. Furthermore, psychological articles reveal that it is harmful for both the child and the parent. A co-dependent parent might consciously want to be helpful, but the hovering, controlling behavior makes the adult child self-doubting and nervous and discourages the adult child’s independent thoughts and activities. In extreme cases of co-dependent parents, the caretaker diminishes and debilitates the child’s self-esteem to onerous levels and the adult child remains totally dependent on the parent; while internally feeling resentful and angered.

Psychological articles argue that such excessive attention towards children is unnatural and can cause serious damage to the personality of a child. It is capable of bringing pain to the parent as well. By not enabling a child to solve his problems and making him depend on them, the parents are hurting their child. They can make him an emotional cripple who will be unable to be self sufficient and adequately navigate the adult role of problem solving and decision making. A co-dependent parent robs the child of the ability to see relationships clearly and to recognize the responsibility of his/her actions.

The co-dependent parent often lies and makes excuses for her child which results in maladaptive ways. Such parents think they can maintain control and build healthy relationships by fostering dependency, but this is never the case. The children of co-dependent parents, reveal psychological articles, are encouraged to comply with the decisions of the parents even if they disagree. The adult child feels incapable of challenging the parents who lead to irrational thinking and self doubt which can cause social withdrawal and future poor decision making strategies.

Psychological articles warn that a situation involving co-dependent parents is a delicate one. A co-dependent parent might believe they know what is best for their child without realizing that the child is being robbed of the right to choose and for chances of learning to make adult decisions. Psychological articles further state that co-dependent single mothers have even greater problems in understanding the independent adult life of their child. In particular, a lonely single mother might find it difficult to accept their child’s leaving home, and thus they feel a loss of identification with a primary role and way of establishing their own self esteem.

Psychological articles stress that co-dependent parents must realize that it is natural for a child to grow up and make autonomous decisions. The adult child must have some freedom to live independently and choose according to what “internally” feels right. Psychological articles tell us that parents can control co-dependency by getting support or professional help and learn to stop worrying and controlling their child’s life. Additionally, psychological articles reveal that it is imperative that co-dependent parents stop trying to plan their adult child’s every move and rather allow the child to find his own path in life.

The Psychological Article on Co-Dependency is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of suggestions on coaching and how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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The Misery of Co-dependency

Sunday, April 26th, 2009

Here are some questions on co-dependency would like you to ask yourself. Do you find it difficult to let go of a relationship? Are you painstakingly loyal and afraid it will hurt the others or anyone for whom you care deeply? Are your children or others you love in danger because you are complicating your relationships? Are you rejecting all solutions offered by trustworthy friends? Do you have secret feelings of shame about your behavior or feelings of “caring” for another? Do you believe you have the ability to totally change another’s behavior and habits? If you have answered yes to any of these questions then you are a co-dependent!

According to psychological articles co-dependents depend on the behavior of their loved one in order to substitute for their personal lack of a sense of self. Oftentimes they have never learned and/or have learned but become oblivious to their own values and needs while heroically trying to mend the ways of the addict (dependent). Fortunately, do provide hope as co-dependency is a common and treatable problem. If you are a co-dependent, you are not alone and there is help.., but you must be willing to commit to yourself and not escape by trying to combat your loved ones problems while ignoring your own. For instance, psychological articles tell us that there are many instances of children, spouses, friends and lovers who have tried to make someone stop drinking or give up drugs. In some of these attempts the co-dependent may have so identified with the “addicted dependent” loved one that the co-dependent may have attempted to drink or do drugs with them to prevent overly excessive use. This “policing” and “over-identification” does not work and can have disastrous consequences in that the co-dependent person, already vulnerability to dependency, can become a drug abuser themselves, simply shifting the object of dependence from the person to the person’s substance. Psychological articles inform us that co-dependents convince themselves that they can change the other person but more often, without help, they wind up losing themselves.

If you are thinking that co-dependency is an addiction to a person, Yes!, you are right. Psychological articles tell us this is exactly what is going on, and this “person” addiction compels the co-dependent to want to adjust the dependents wrongs, and fix the other person; a psychologically impossibility. As stated in other Boomer Yearbook psychological articles, co-dependence usually results from a dysfunctional childhood family of origin, such as an alcoholic or abusive environment. If these circumstances fit your upbringing it will not guarantee that you will become co-dependent, but it behooves you to check out the signs, see if you fit the profile, and if you do, get help, as psychological articles state you can be susceptible to relationship addiction or co-dependency issues.

Co-dependency fills the person with an obsession to protect the other “dependent” person from harm and to decide for him/him because the co-dependent feels they can make a better decision than the dependent loved one. However, what the co-dependent is really trying to do is gain some control of their own life by trying to control others. This control can even extend to adult children, in that co-dependent parents, (sometimes called “hovering or helicopter parents”) can still feel their children are incapable of handling independent lives as mature adults, and will intrude and give unasked for advice, judgments, and opinions.

Additionally, the co-dependent has lost their freedom of choice as they are no longer an autonomous person but are living in the shadow of your partner. Psychological articles reveal that the co-dependents life totally revolves around the needs and occurrences of the person to whom they are addicted of co-dependent upon, and are content with the submissive role as it is a defense, an escape from the lack of self-fulfillment and personal responsibility. Compulsive urges control the co-dependents behavior and oftentimes leaves the person feeling helpless, and terrified of losing or damaging the relationship.

Psychological articles bring hope stating that all these miseries brought by co-dependency can be treated and resolved. In some cases there are group supports and recovering co-dependents can provide help, and there are many therapists specifically trained to aid the recovery of co-dependent issues. Psychological articles state that the therapeutic goal is to give the co-dependent a sense of self, improve self esteem and learn to think and act like an independent adult.

The Psychological Article on Co-Dependency is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Symptoms of Codependency Psychological Articles by Boomeryearbook.com

Saturday, April 25th, 2009

Psychological articles dealing with codependency issues point out that a co-dependent’s obsessive behavior towards the dependent family member or friend can be very intrusive. The co-dependent person might care so much that it becomes a psychological obsession and can make the other person feel their boundaries are being violated and even experience the perception of feeling emotionally assaulted. Such a relationship is usually seriously unhealthy to all parties involved.

First, one must be aware of co-dependence symptoms in order to combat the disorder. A co-dependent, while appearing too close to another person is actually avoiding true intimacy. While boasting of personal perfection, the reality is that the co-dependent is really distrustful, hyper-vigilant, and strives to obsessively control another’s behavior at the psychological expense of the other person; even subjecting his dependent person to debilitating physical or emotional abuse in order to maintain the status quo and perpetuate the “unhealthy” mutual dependency. Most extreme cases of co-dependence are accompanied by depression; as the relationship is mutually destructive and frustrating.

Signs of Co-dependency

The thoughts and feelings of a co-dependence lead to destructive behavior that can cause pain not only to the co-dependent but to others as well, state psychological articles on the issue. These behavioral patterns can harm otherwise healthy relationships and make people anxious, angry and unhappy. Psychological article stress that only we can change our behavior, others simply cannot!

Co-dependents act in emotionally destructive ways in spite of their possible good intentions, exhibiting the following characteristics:

* Co-dependents may consider themselves responsible for other people’s needs, thoughts, feelings, behavior, choices, well-being and destiny.
* If their subject is facing some problem the co-dependent will become anxious, feel pity and guilt.
* Co-dependents have an uncontrollable urge to help the subject of their co-dependency to resolve any problem; offering unasked for advice or giving numerous quick suggestions.
* They are likely to express anger when their help proves ineffective.
* They will anticipate other’s needs and will wonder why others don’t do the same for them.
* They will do more than what is reasonably expected or required and will even do work which other people can comfortably do for themselves.
* They will feel safe when giving to others and unsafe when others give to them.
* They will try to please others at the expense of their own pleasure.
* They will not know what they need or want and even if they do know, will convince themselves that personal needs are not as important as serving the needs of others.
* They will feel “victimized”, as they are attracted to needy people and feel sad over all they have given to another while others have not given to them.
* They will feel very bored and worthless if they do not have a problem to solve or someone needy to help.
* They will over-commit themselves, give up their routine to help someone else, and then feel resentful for doing so.

While frequently denying their dysfunctional histories, psychological articles tell us that co-dependents come from troubled families of origin and harbor much resentment. Feelings of malcontent are manifested in the co-dependents typically guarded and defensive behaviors interspersed with episodes of easily becoming angered and lashing out in righteous railings against their subject of dependence and the world in general. Although psychological articles tell us that co-dependents feel they are special and different, they nonetheless appear to adopt a “martyr-like” stance and will reject compliments. They feel unappreciated and victimized. They are afraid of rejection and making mistakes. They are very pessimistic, and they very much need therapeutic support and psychological help to break the destructive patterns.

Co-dependency can ruin lives. We at Boomer Yearbook urge you to recognize the symptoms and if you find you are suffering from this debilitating disorder, to seek help.

The Psychological Article on Co-Dependency is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of suggestions on how to recognize and alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Co-Dependency Issues: Learning How to Let Go

Saturday, April 25th, 2009

Psychological Article on Co-Dependency

Psychological Article on Co-Dependency

Psychological Articles by Boomeryearbook.com

All You can Control is Yourself

According to psychological articles we should have only one main responsibility- to make decisions for our own future and find ways to make our own life easy and comfortable. Controlling others and their lives is thus NOT our responsibility and thus cannot bring any happiness. Psychological articles have repeatedly stressed the fact that we with the exception of caring for young children, we can create success, love, and happiness just for ourselves and no one else; as psychological articles inform us that whenever we try to create these states of happiness, love and success from outside we pass on our power to the external world and lose control over the power of creating our own lives. The reason behind this is simple - these states can only be created from within!

Co-Dependency: A Plague

Psychological articles have observed that people suffering from ‘co-dependency’ have typically experienced an emotionally troubled or otherwise dysfunctional childhood, leaving the person unable to detach her/himself from others, to properly attend to personal circumstances, and thus not able to obtain good resolutions of their own problems. Feeling incompetent in their own lives, the co-dependent person becomes needy of others and outer-circumstances, causing an extremely unhealthy personality characteristic for everyone involved. In order to feel competent and important the co-dependent tries to control others; first through showing compassion and advice giving, which inevitable leads to lecturing and emotional black mail. Psychological articles tell us that sometimes co-dependents are simply re-living their pain by recalling their own painful childhood, and in other circumstances they are not only re-playing old familiar patterns of behavior but they are unconsciously trying to “fix” their own dysfunctional situation by enabling others.

Total dependency

Co-dependents are unhappy people and experience intense psychological pain as they are totally dependent on somebody or something other than themselves; a situation that never brings inner peace or joy. Additionally, psychological articles tell us that they oftentimes put themselves in emotionally, financially, and even physically high risk situations as they are so busy “caring for others” that they fail to provide for their own safety. They do not treat themselves with dignity or respect as they have turned over their own power to empower others and never fully gain the ability to identify good personal choices. They fail to get consolation from within, and without as “externals” can not support “internal” emotional needs and well-being.

Look Within

Since unable to control whatever is outside of self, the co-dependent must learn to spare themselves from the pain and unhealthy dependency on others and learn to rely on inner peace and power; making personally useful decisions, and bringing honor, dignity, love and true happiness.

The best approach if you have co-dependency issues, according to psychological articles, is for you to control them by shedding your fear of feeling out of control. To do this, you must feel responsible for your own emotions and behaviors and not try to escape authenticity by associating feelings of gratification with anything or anyone outside of yourself. Only personal responsibility can bring lasting peace and happiness.

Psychological articles emphasize that if you are suffering from co-dependency issues keep the following in mind:

1. You do not have any right to control or change others but it is in your power to control and change yourself.
2. Your attempts at controlling the outside world will only result in your being controlled by it.
3. You endanger yourself by relying on other people and situations for love and safety.
4. You can easily supply love and faith in life from inside youself.

The Psychological Article on Co-Dependency is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of out of the ordinary suggestions on how to alleviate elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook is Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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The Health Benefits of Honey and Cinnamon

Saturday, April 18th, 2009

Pscyhological Articles on Benefits of Honey and Cinnamon

Pscyhological Articles on Benefits of Honey and Cinnamon

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems

by Boomeryearbook.com

Honey and cinnamon have a long tradition as herbal remedies for numerous conditions. Honey in particular has been presented in psychological articles as a cure-for-all in many problems like heart disease, arthritis, stomach ailments etc. Additionally, anectodal information in psychological articles has claimed that when used with cinnamon, the combination greatly increases the scope and power of honey. Moreover, recent research in psychological articleshas shown that eating honey in moderate amounts doesn’t increase the probability of getting diabetes. In 1985 the Canadian magazine Weekly World News listed conditions and problems that respond positively to treatment with a combination of honey and cinnamon.

Heart Problems and Arthritis:

The above mentioned psychological article stated that honey and cinnamon both have properties that provide protection from heart problems and arthritis. Honey decreases the amount of hardened cholesterol in arteries thereby reducing the chances of a heart attack, and for those who have suffered a heart attack, if used regularly, it protects from further attacks. One of the elderly problems we face as we grow older is that arteries and veins become weaker, and it has been shown that honey can be revitalizing.

Psychological articles have also informed us that Arthritis has also been shown to significantly improve with regular usage of honey and cinnamon. It is recommended that ideally the honey and cinnamon combination should be taken in a cup of hot water with a half a teaspoon of cinnamon and two of honey. In a study at Copenhagen University, seventy three patients of a total of 200 were cured of their Arthritis while the rest experienced significant relief!

Stomach problems and flu.

Generally stomach problems are helped significantly by honey. Bladder infections respond immediately to honey if mixed with warm water and taken in liquid form as psychological articles have long told of the power of honey to destroy germs in the bladder. The same combination of drinking honey and cinnamon also works well with colds, flu. Psychological articles have advised to use one quarter teaspoon of cinnamon added to the honey to help coughs and blocked sinuses. Honey is also known to work well on stomach ulcers and reduces pain and gas when used with cinnamon and psychological articles as well as folklore has informed us that honey and cinnamon can easily eliminate bad breath.

Immune system and longevity

Psychological articles have stated that both honey and cinnamon have been proven to strengthen the immune system of viral and bacterial infections, and that when taken together the ingredients that have large amounts of natural minerals in the form of vitamins and iron, greatly help white blood cells fight disease, although existing in synthetic form, the combination of elements in honey has a greater effect. Furthermore, psychological articles report that this increased immune response from taking honey and cinnamon also enhances general health as well as longevity. Used in combination with a healthy lifestyle, (daily usage of 3 or 4 times a day) of both ingredients has been recommended to help eliminate many elderly problems, to maintain good health and live a longer life.

Skin problems

Due to its antibiotic properties, honey used in pastes to cover rashes and other skin problems has a relieving and healing effect. Common problems such as pimples, which psychological articles tell us honey can remove from their roots, usually respond particularly well. More serious infections like eczema, ringworm etc. have also been shown to have significant positive effects and sometimes, psychological articles report them as cured.

Weight loss, anti-carcinogenic and fatigue

Psychological articles have documented that fat formation is prevented if one teaspoon of honey and cinnamon mixed into a cup of boiled water is routinely taken before breakfast and before bed, as it helps reduce weight- even in obese people! Furthermore, in some instances, honey and cinnamon have been shown to be an effective anti-cancer remedy resulting partly from their ability to strengthen the immune system as well as their cleansing qualities. Likewise, apathy, fatigue and increases in strength have been reported in psychological articles from the regular usage of honey and cinnamon taken in equal part. Research has shown that a tablespoon of honey sprinkled with powder made from cinnamon is an effective single dosage.

The Psychological Article on The Benefits of Honey and Cinnamon is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on Elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook contains Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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A Boomer’s Guide To Dog Ticks: II

Saturday, April 18th, 2009

Baby Boomers Guide to Dog Ticks

Baby Boomers Guide to Dog Ticks

By Boomeryearbook.com

Since dog ticks do not usually harm people, they can be seen as an almost harmless nuisance. Fortunately, in the case of humans, by and large it usually is. The same can’t be said for dogs, and lack of awareness of what dog ticks or tick-borne diseases (TBD) can do to your pet can have disastrous consequences.

The first sign of a problem is a number of symptoms such as a general lack of health, unexplained feverish spells, lethargy, and lack of appetite and in extended cases: anorexia. You sense that something is wrong but you and your Vet may be unaware that it is TBD and thus are treating the symptoms of a syndrome rather than the underlying disease. When such symptoms present yourself, always be on the lookout for TBD as a possible culprit.

Called ‘ehrlichiosis’ in veterinarian science, TBD has an extensive number of bacterium that are borne by different types of ticks. As some ticks are more common in some places than others, particular types of TBDs are prevalent in different parts of the country. The most common is Ehrlichia canis and German Shepherds are known to be prone to the disease. In most TBDs, including E. Canis, the basic area of attack is the bone marrow of the dog that is of central importance to the immune system. As a consequence, the immune system of the dog is compromised and your pet gets sick easily, and sometimes this leads to an undiagnosed case and thus the Vet treats each and every illness separately without understanding that they are all related.

The transmission of TBD is generally the same. People are often prone to believing that cleaner environments compared to farms or dumps means that TBD won’t be a problem. However that’s not the case. Ticks latch themselves on to the dog’s skin; near the ear, under the legs, neck and shoulder. It penetrates the skin with pincers which also keeps it in place. Bacteria are transmitted through these pincers that feed and mate through the host’s (your pet’s) blood. If you find a tick on your dog, take a pair of tweezers to the tick’s head and remove it completely as you do not want it to become even more embedded into your beloved dog’s body. Ticks are really dangerous to your dog as they can not only transmit bacteria but can also sometimes cause temporary paralysis while secreting chemicals; a condition called ‘tick paralysis’.

Aside from E. Canis, other types of TBD are Ehrlichia ewingii, Anaplasma platys, Neorickettsia risticii, Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Each type varies in the type of tick that bears the disease, the regions where they are more prevalent, the severity of the problems they cause and the manner they infect and sicken the dog. Invariably, if left untreated and on entering the chronic stage of a TBD, dogs usually die with organ failure or another disease that doesn’t respond to medicine, giving it the awful recognition as “quiet dog killer”.

After being briefly introduced to TBDs, some precautions can be made to avoid this dreadful problem. One of the first things is to keep your dog as clean as possible while closely observing its skin for any strange lumps, which can be an indication that a tick has latched onto your pet. Also be on the lookout for any repeated sicknesses, loss of appetite and the other symptoms noted in the above mentioned Article One. Also, keep your pet’s environment clean; it may not prevent ticks but it may lesson infestation.

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. So please use monthly dog and flea preventative measures and let your Vet check out any suspicious symptoms your pet may be exhibiting.

www.boomeryearbook.com is a free social networking site connecting the baby boomers generation. Whether you are a member of the baby boomers generation or are related to someone who is, you will find plenty to do here. Free psychological articles on a vast variety of topics such as dream analysis, coaching and self-help, elderly problems, examinations and proposed solutions for types of discrimination along with weekly updates on mental and medical health. You can also become a non-member subscriber to our free newsletter to receive these articles directly in your inbox so you don’t miss out.

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A Boomer’s Guide To Dog Ticks: I

Saturday, April 18th, 2009

Bayb Boomers Guide to Dog Ticks

Bayb Boomers Guide to Dog Ticks

By Boomeryearbook.com

Our precious dogs are definitely part of our families, yet unlike our human loved ones, our four legged relatives can not tell us where they may hurt or if they are feeling sick or uncomfortable. And since for the most part human and canines exhibit “different” signs of illness, it’s therefore quite understandable that we two legged creatures become confused in trying to interpret our pet’s symptoms. Fortunately, that’s where our Vets come into play as by and large our dog health providers, (and some very experienced dog owners) manage to avoid pitfalls or misinterpretations in dog symptoms and their related causes. However, there is one notable exception that can defy diagnosis by even the most seasoned Vet; that being dog tick-born disease (TBD).

Oftentimes ticks are mistakenly believed to result from “unsanitary” environmental conditions such as a neglected farm house or otherwise non-hygienic environment wherein TBD is seen as something lurking around just waiting to infect your dog. But this is far from the truth and can frequently catch a dog owner unaware as ticks do not discriminate and dog tick infestation is found in many upscale sanitized suburban neighborhoods. All dog owners need to be proactive in avoiding TBD (by using monthly preventative medications) as well as being on the lookout for all signs and symptoms as TBD can be difficult to diagnose and if left untreated can be fatal for your beloved pet.

Complicating matters further, some dogs who don’t have full blown symptoms of TBD are nonetheless carriers (i.e., think Typhoid Mary of the dog world), as dog ticks can live on other animals, can survive in non living environments such as dog bedding, towels, shoes and boots, carpets, or even hiding out in car upholstery just waiting for an unprotected dog to present itself for a good tick feed. While dog ticks are usually not interested in attaching themselves to people and are thus harmless to us 2 legged creatures, (remember we are talking about dog ticks illness TBD, not Deer ticks which can bring Lyme Disease to people), dog ticks love our dog’s blood and can easily latch on and cause problems. Some dogs tend to recover from a dog tick infection, however, a pet can be chronically sick, showing no or seemingly inconclusive symptoms, and can be gradually deteriorating before our unsuspecting eyes. Please be on the lookout as TBD can be solved if detected and treated early and of course, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure—ALWAYS remember to apply your dog’s monthly tick and flea medication.

Step one after seeing symptoms- get your dog to the Vet for a proper diagnosis. Your Vet will check your dog’s skin for lumps, either large or small, that may be latched on ticks. Second, be on the lookout for these possible symptoms of TBD:

1. Changes in appetite
2. Changes in urine and feces color
3. Your dog’s immune system might seem more vulnerable than it once was with evidence of lethargy, loss of appetite, fever and anorexia.

Any of the above may be a sign of onset of a TBD problem, and must be checked. Initially, TBD may be quite subtle but eventually, if untreated, TBD or ehrlichiosis can cause death.

There are various types of TBD with Ehrlichia canis being the most common, followed by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Ehrlichia ewingii, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Anaplasma platys, and Neorickettsia risticii. Each type, bacterium and tick alike, have various prognoses that share basic signs - but some are more treatable than others depending on the stage of the disease. The one thing they all share is deception, as TBD can mimic other illnesses. For example, tick paralysis is frequently misread as epilepsy, wherein the poor animal has a fit with momentary paralysis that looks like an epileptic attack. In fact, it’s a neurotoxin released by a tick into the bloodstream. Less dramatically though, lethargy, loss of appetite, fever and anorexia are signs seen in infected dogs.

Apart from recognizing that your dog might have TBD and taking him to a good Vet, other precautions are also possible. TBD doesn’t necessarily develop if you see a tick on your dog. Removing it is a precaution worth taking, however, care must be taken by removing it with a curved Kelly forceps, tweezers or a tool made for that purpose. Routine checking and keeping your dog clean are great ways to be proactive and not allow TBD to harm your pet.

Whatever the precautions taken TBD can still occur. The best solution is a general awareness of TBD, an understanding of your dog’s health, and early detection and treatment.

www.boomeryearbook.com is a free social networking site connecting the baby boomers generation. Whether you are a member of the baby boomers generation or are related to someone who is, you will find plenty to do here. Free psychological articles on a vast variety of topics such as dream analysis, coaching and self-help, elderly problems, examinations and proposed solutions for types of discrimination along with weekly updates on mental and medical health. You can also become a non-member subscriber to our free newsletter to receive these articles directly in your inbox so you don’t miss out.

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Elderly Problems: Benefits and Risks of Seniors Living Alone

Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

Elderly Problems: Benefits and Risks of Seniors Living Alone

Elderly Problems: Benefits and Risks of Seniors Living Alone

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems

By Boomeryearbook.com

An elderly problem that is often overlooked is how to live alone. It is overlooked not only by the caregivers, but more so by the elderly person themselves. After living independently upwards of thirty or forty years, it’s a difficult thing to realize that your independence is becoming limited. Thus, when possible, psychological articles tell us that it is advisable to allow an elderly individual to remain at home as it promotes a greater sense of security and well being, resulting in less anxiety and stress related health problems. However, living alone can pose significant challenges and other elderly problems, and needs to be well thought out to optimize the benefits and minimize the potential risks.

In addition to promoting security and independence, psychological articles and research inform us that living alone can stimulate the brain, helping to curb some other elderly problems such as boredom or forgetfulness. An independent person must make all kinds of simple daily decisions that we often take for granted until it is taken away from us. Small decisions such as what time to eat, what to eat, or when to do the laundry and clean the house make all the difference. These little decisions help to stimulate the brain and give us something to do, thus avoiding feelings of aimless boredom. If a person is less bored, they are less likely to feel lonely or depressed.

If family is unable to handle all of the responsibility of allowing a loved one to remain in their home, there are programs that offer assistance to help alleviate some elderly problems. Some of them include telephone calls at specific times from volunteers or social workers. If there is no answer, they can then call a family member or whoever is in charge. Depending on the health of the person, there is also the option of having a registered nurse attend to the patient’s elderly problems at home during day time hours. Many programs such as “Meals on Wheels” will bring food to senior citizens at a predetermined time every day. This eliminates the need for one meal to be cooked at home and is particularly useful to persons with low income.

Forcing a person to leave their home may bring on other elderly problems such as confusion, disorientation, or bouts of anger. This may be especially true if a person has lived several years in that home. If memories of children and grandchildren are attached to that particular location, it can be hard to leave, as psychological articles tell us that feelings of deep loss and abandonment may occur. If a person must leave their home because there is no one available to check in on them or because of health reasons, it is important to handle the move with delicacy and care so as to avoid creating additional elderly problems. Surround the person with pictures and other memories. Visit often and allow them to maintain as much independence and decision making as possible.

The Psychological Article on Living Alone is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on Elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook contains Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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Elderly Sleeping Problems

Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

Elderly Problems: Insomnia

Elderly Problems: Insomnia

Psychological Articles on Elderly Problems


By Boomeryearbook.com

According to the Encarta Dictionary, insomnia is the “inability to fall asleep or to remain asleep long enough to feel rested, especially when this is a problem that continues over time,” and unfortunately this condition of sleeplessness is one of the most frequent elderly problems. Psychological articles tell us that it often results from sleep cycle changes that occur with aging as well as various other elderly psychological, emotional, and bodily changes. Most elderly patients are very light sleepers because their sleep cycle is shorter than that of a child’s or a young adult’s. The elderly problem of disrupted sleep often derives from the elderly person’s sleep being fitful and restless and, consequently, abruptly waking many times during the course of a night.

It is important to note that insomnia is generally not an exclusive elderly problem in and of itself. Insomnia is often linked with or caused by other elderly problems such as arthritis pain, emotional stress, etc. If a patient is in any kind of pain or distress, whether it be physical or emotional, it can be hard to sleep soundly. Generally, psychological articles say that the patient’s underlying symptoms should be the first course of treatment to see if that alleviates the insomnia. If initial symptom treatment fails and there is still no improvement in sleep then a patient may consider looking to other treatments or medications for help falling and staying asleep. However, there is a risk of dependency with many medical sleep aids. In addition, it is not a good idea for elderly patients to use over the counter medications such as antihistamines for sleeping aids as they tend to have negative side effects in elderly patients, possibly even leading or exacerbating the elderly problems of confusion and delirium.

There are additional things that aging baby boomers and the elderly can do to facilitate sleep. For instance, eliminating bedroom temperature climate problems can make a tremendous improvement in alleviating insomnia, so it is advisable to check to see that the temperature in the bedroom is just right and not too hot or too cold. Another tip is to establish a regular bedtime routine; this means readying for bed and turning off the lights for sleep at the same time every night. Psychological articles refer to this as good sleep hygiene as it helps set the body’s natural biological clock, telling your body it is sleepy as it gets close to the accustomed bed time. Also, avoid the use of too much alcohol, especially around bedtime as it can disrupt your sleep cycle by first making you sleepy and then as the boost of sugar hits your system, waking you up in the middle of the night. Lastly, avoid taking daytime naps, specifically multiple daytime naps because this will also make it harder to sleep at night.

Whatever, the cause or causes of your personal insomnia, it is should not be considered a typical elderly problem. It is not a normal sign of aging so do not write it off as one. Consider all of your sources and possible causes. If you are still unable to fix the problem with some simple changes, contact your physician to see what he or she might recommend. A good night’s sleep is essential to maintain proper body functioning and that goes for every single person, young or old.

The Psychological Article on The Elderly Problem of Insomnia is part of Boomer Yearbook’s continuing series of psychological articles on Elderly problems. We believe knowledge is power. We’d love to hear what you think.

Boomer Yearbook contains Psychological Articles for Baby Boomers. Connect with old and new friends, or expand your mind and ward off senior moments and elderly problems with dream analysis and online optical illusions and brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join other Baby Boomers to stay informed, receive weekly Newsfeeds, and let your opinions be heard. Baby boomers changed the world. We’re not done yet!

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