Archive for November, 2008

Amaretto Sweet Potatoes

Wednesday, November 26th, 2008

Save time and forget the stress while preparing these yummy home cooked meals that are sure to be a hit with family and friends.

8 medium sweet potatoes, scrubbed
2 sticks of unsalted butter
6 tablespoons amaretto liqueur
1 1/4 cup of dark brown sugar
zest from orange and a bit of the orange rind shredded
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Boil your potatoes until tender. Cool and peel the skin off and them mash in a pyrex or corning ware dish. Melt your butter & blend in the brown sugar. Pour this mixture over the potatoes and add the amaretto & zest from the orange. Bake for about 15 mins. until warm and then shred a little orange rind on the top. Yummy!!!!!!!!!
Hungering for more fast and delicious recipes? Come join www.boomeryearbook.com and Check out ‘What’s Cookin’ with Peggy.

www.boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.

Autumn Butternut Casserole

Monday, November 24th, 2008

3 cups mashed, cooked butternut squash
1/4 cup butter
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/4 teas. salt
1 1/2 tablespoon butter
6 cups of Jonathan apples(about 2 lbs)
1/4 cup sugar
1 1/2 cups of corn flakes crushed
1/2 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoon butter
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Season squash with 1/4 cup of butter, 1 tablespoon brown sugar, 1/4 teas. salt. Heat 1 1/2 tablespoons butter in a skillet with the sliced apples sprinkle with 1/4 cup sugar cover and simmer over low heat until barely tender about 5 mins. Spread in a 3 qt. casserole and spoon mashed squash evenly over apples. Mix corn flakes with 1/2 cup brown sugar 7 melted butter. Sprinkle over squash. Bake 350 degrees for 15 mins.

Save time and forget the stress while preparing these yummy home cooked meals that are sure to be a hit with family and friends. Hungering for more fast and delicious recipes? Come join www.boomeryearbook.com and Check out ‘What’s Cookin’ with Peggy.

Boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit

Parmesan Green Beans

Monday, November 24th, 2008

2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teas. salt
1/2 teas. pepper
1/8 teas. garlic salt
1 cup 2% milk
3/4 teas. Worcestershire
4 tablespoons grated Parmesan Cheese(divided)
2 14.5 oz. can cut green beans
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Melt butter in medium saucepan. Mix flour, salt, pepper, and garlic salt. Stir in milk and heat until thickened. Add Worcestershire and 1/2 Parmesan cheese. Add green beans and heat through. Add remaining Parmesan cheese and stir. Yummy

Save time and forget the stress while preparing these yummy home cooked meals that are sure to be a hit with family and friends. Hungering for more fast and delicious recipes? Come join www.boomeryearbook.com and Check out ‘What’s Cookin’ with Peggy.

Boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit

Cranberry Jello Mold

Monday, November 24th, 2008

1 3oz. rasberry jello
1 cup water
1/3 cup of sugar
16 oz. whole cranberry sauce
8 oz. sour cream
1 cup chopped apples peeled & diced
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Dissolve Jell-O in one cup boiling water. Add sugar and dissolve. Add cranberry sauce, sour cream and apples. Blend through lightly. Line Jell-O mold with a little mayonnaise. Add ingredients and refrigerate until firm. Unmold on plate.

Save time and forget the stress while preparing these yummy home cooked meals that are sure to be a hit with family and friends. Hungering for more fast and delicious recipes? Come join www.boomeryearbook.com and Check out ‘What’s Cookin’ with Peggy.

Boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit

As White As Wine!

Sunday, November 23rd, 2008


Though the popular one in the world of wines is the red wine; it is the white cousin that is actually the choice of the classes.

We’ve spoken about this in the earlier articles saying that due to shortage of white wine, vintners tried to make white wine with red grapes, and hence rose wines were born. Now, the actual glamour of wine lies in the white version; and all over the world, it is the white wines that command a premium, as the grape variant does not grow so easily all over the world.

For all kinds of meetings and various get-togethers, white wine is the beverage of choice, as it signifies class and subtlety. In America, the Napa Valley is the top wine producing region – as is a known fact. But did you know that the region actually became very popular only after the Paris wine tasting festival in 1976; where a Chardonnay white wine variety beat all the other popular French and Italian wines in a blind tasting competition?

It is this event that made the world sit up and notice Napa Valley as a premier wine producing region. Since then, American white wine also has been counted as one of the best vintages of wine in the world.

Trivia – The actual color of white wine is not white. It is either Yellow or a pale Golden. If the vintage comes out to a darker shade, the vintners combine a paler variant to bring the color back.

According to a study at the medical department of the University of Connecticut, White wine has also been found to be as good as Red for the heart. But then, only when taken in moderation. So, have your glass of white guilt free, and feel good that you are helping your heart too!

Thirsting for more wine tips? Come join our oenophiles and fellow wine lovers at www.boomeryearbook.com

www.boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.

American Wines

Sunday, November 23rd, 2008

We have been talking about wines for several articles now, and onwww.boomeryearbook.com, we have been mentioning that boomers and wines are a combination that’s a big hit.

But then, for a country that is among the leading wine consumers of the world, wine production in the USA was seriously started only by the boomers of our generation. In other parts of the world, the history of wine making goes back to over 6000 years! But then, the history of wine making will be talked about in another article.

Wines have been in production in areas such as Napa Valley, California for over 150 years now, but thanks to various kinds of challenges – ranging from the unavailability of proper grape varieties to a repeated attack by disease; the world only noticed American wines in the late 1970s. That achievement was thanks to a local Chardonnay winning a blindtasting competition against several other popular French wines.

Now, America is among the top wine producing and exporting nations in the world (ranked 4th and 7th respectively). But the funny thing is that overseas, even today, if one is given a choice of an American wine and a French one, typically people prefer French ones, even if they are of a more recent vintage than the American ones. That is primarily due to the fact that most of the vintages here in the USA have been brought in from France and other regions in Europe, and possibly a little snobbery on the part of the Europeans.

But in the USA, except in elite restaurants that pride themselves on serving only French wines (god only knows why!), in most other places, American wines are considered to be equally good – if not better. And the price is lower too.

For the boomers who are used to a regular dose of wine, anything goes, as long as it’s red! Doesn’t it?

Thirsting for more wine tips? Come learn from our oneophiles and join fellow wine lovers at www.boomeryearbook.com

www.boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.

As Red as Wine

Sunday, November 23rd, 2008

For most of us boomers, the word ‘Wine’ is synonymous with ‘Red Wine’.

Especially since American wines started being made with gusto, reds have come more into fashion. In fact, all over the world, the demand for white wine was so great that the production could not keep up. And white grapes could not be grown all over the world. Hence started the tradition of making white wine from red grapes, and that is what created the all new Rose wines. Later on, Rose sparkling wines also were invented; but that’s a different story.

Coming to the actual boomers consumption of red wine, it greatly started in the 1990s, as a reaction to the TV show 60 minutes, which showed a report that regular consumption of red wine positively impacted the heart. THE thing that our generation is obsessed with is health. So, anything that is supposed to positively impact our health is immediately accepted by everyone! And hence red wine also became popular big time almost over night.

Actually, the health benefit is true. There’s a chemical called Resveratrol that’s present in red wine, that’s reportedly good for the heart when consumed in small quantities. The key word here is ‘small quantity’. It has been shown in surveys around the world that moderate drinkers have a lower risk of heart disease than even non-drinkers! That probably is the reason why red wine is so revered by most of the people from our generation. Another study reveals that Cabernet Sauvignon (which is one of the world’s premier grape varieties) has shown positive effects on Alzheimer’s!

Who knew that wine had so many benefits?

We guess the day is not far off when doctor’s prescriptions will have an RX asking you to buy a particular brand of enhanced red wine for its health benefits. Cheers till then J

www.boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.

Usher in the Sparkles

Sunday, November 23rd, 2008

Boomer Yearbook is the numero uno destination for all things related to Boomers, and as part of that series, we have a range of articles on one of the passions of our lives – Wine!

In fact, wine isn’t just a passion of our generation; it has been around for a very long time now. But over the last fifty years or so, wine has grown from a common beverage to being a part and parcel of our lives. Every single occasion we have at home or outside, wine plays a major role. Our demand for good wine is insatiable, and though of a different grade from the French beauties, American wines also have been in great demand in our country.

The first part of that series is right here, and to start real happy, we’ve looked up some nice info about the sparkling variety.

Trivia - Did you know that Champagne is not a reference to all the sparkling varieties, but only to wines grown in the Champagne region of France? Over a period of time, this variety became so popular that Champagne could not fulfill the demand. So, other regions also started producing sparkling wines and they also popularly came to be called Champagne.

There are several vineyards in the USA, but one of the most popular has to be the region of California that is renowned over the world for its Rose wines. This kind of wine is made by using red grapes to make white wine! The wines of California are semi-sweet, and that is what makes them so popular with the ladies and with the younger generation of people. A survey confirmed that many boomers would prefer the older varieties of Whites and Reds, rather than the American wines. Which one do you prefer?

Come join your fellow boomers and share experiences at www.boomeryearbook.com

www.boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.

What is the Face of the American Boomer?

Friday, November 21st, 2008

What does the average American Baby boomer look like? We all know how old they are; they were all born between 1946 and 1964. But is she more likely to be a he? Where does he come from? What does she do for a living?

Much is made of the similarities among boomers - that they were the first generation to grow up with television, that many of them lived through the civil rights era and the Vietnam War. Finding out what historic events they share is as easy as opening a history book or searching on Google. But what distinguishes them from one another is not always apparent from their public image.

Researchers and advocates are trying to correct that, to combat generalizations that depict the 77 million-strong group as all retirees, or suburbanites, or free-loving Woodstock groupies. Understanding boomer diversity across age, ethnic, and economic lines is necessary to accurately assess the needs and actions of the members of the group.

The media often lump boomers into one big homogeneous category, the report notes, including suggesting that they all have similar upbringings, are well educated, affluent, or are married with children. Many researchers say that thinking of the boomers in too-general terms could produce retirement policies that affect some boomers adversely. Stereotypes also mask the reality about the group, whose diversity reflects that of society.

“The harm in over-generalizing comes from a policy standpoint,” says Mary Elizabeth Hughes, a professor at Duke University and coauthor of a recent analysis of boomer lives, including their diversity. “[Our report shows] the income inequality, or the wealth inequality in the boomers. And that suggests that some boomers are going to be very well off in retirement, and other boomers are going to be really struggling.”

An obvious example of diversity among the boomers is their age range, which spans 19 years and means that while some boomers are grandparents, others are still getting kids into preschool.

The differences are especially true for women. Just like any other generation, female baby boomers have had different experiences based on the choices we’ve made. So while there were plenty of women who climbed the corporate ladder, there were also many women who chose to stay at home.

Marketers are already honing their pitches to try to reach particular segments of the boomers - such as those in their late 40s and early 50s whose kids are leaving the nest. But some findings in the Duke report, which is based on census data from 2000 and earlier, suggest more fine-tuning across cultural lines may be needed. The baby boomers are more diverse than popularly recognized. Twelve percent of baby boomers are black, 9 percent are Hispanic, 4 percent are Asian or Pacific Islander and less than 1 percent are American Indian or native Alaskan. But the Duke Professors found that racial inequality persists for baby boomers, in terms of education and wealth. Incomes of blacks are higher than in earlier generations, and more of them have moved into the middle class, says Hughes, “but on the whole, black boomers really did not improve their condition, relative to whites, compared to the generation immediately preceding them.”

Perceptions from society still persist, however. One can find that on many baby boomer social sites boomers discuss whether people born in the early 1960s are really boomers if they don’t feel they fit in the generation. One can also find several comments from 20- and 30-somethings who suggest that the boomers are a mass of greedy people who are taking all the jobs.

There is no real homogeneity that exists within the boomer generation, except for the simple fact that they experienced the same changes and events, yes many of them historic, that were going on in their world. But just like those before them and those that came after, what they chose to do with those experiences is what makes them hugely diverse.

Boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.

Tipping the Scale: Obesity in Baby Boomers

Friday, November 21st, 2008

In the 1960s and 1970s, there was a Cultural Revolution brewing in America. Many people were products of war, despair and the Great Depression and so they all longed for days of peace, love and the American dream.

Young people were busy then, brimming with ideals about clean air, clean water, a cleaner Many have assumed the largest generation in US history, as it moves up the age escalator will be the healthiest generation of aging adults because they grew up in wealthier times, exercised more, smoked less, and were more knowledgeable about health. This assumption has been proven wrong.

Studying the dynamics of health of this population is more challenging than any other generation due to their size, composition, earlier life experiences, and exposure to differing historical events.

For instance, there is an apparent paradox in the trends of increasing exercise levels and a significant rise in obesity over the last few decades. In order to explain these two differing patterns, changes in leisure-time physical activity, work-related activity, eating habits, fast-food super-sizing, and environmental factors influencing healthy lifestyles are taken into account. So even if the boomer generation as a whole is increasing their exercise levels, the eating habits of North Americans, and in particular, the quantity and quality of fast-food consumption both in restaurants and at home cancels out the benefits of any healthy exercise regime.

We live in a pressure-cooker technological world of high prices, advertising, TV, cell phones, taxes, pollution, long work hours, dual wage earner families, occupational disruptions, and affordable housing shortages. These factors contribute to a fast pace of living and thus higher obesity in conjunction with the availability of cheap but poor quality fast foods.

Overweight and obese “baby boomers” are entering their senior years with weight-related problems that are plaguing their “golden years” with problems, increasing the need for nursing homes and medical care. 62% of 50-64 year olds claim to have at least one of the following obesity related chronic conditions: heart disease, hypertension, cancer, arthritis and high cholesterol.

Already faced with a nursing care shortage in America, experts are projecting a need for an additional 10-25 percent of nursing home care, and an explosion in weight-related Type 2 diabetes. Studies show that overweight parents are also producing, via poor eating habits and lack of exercise regimens, overweight children with an increase of Type 2 diabetes.
Type 2 diabetes is more common than type 1 diabetes, where in both cases the body has trouble controlling blood sugar due to problems with insulin, a hormone that controls blood sugar.

Baby boomers as a generation are defined as trend-setters; so why not lead the pack by getting 30 minutes of exercise every day, cutting down on fatty foods, double your portions of fruits and veggies and show your children how to lead a fitter, healthier life.

Boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.