Archive for October, 2008

Peppered Shrimp Alfredo

Friday, October 31st, 2008

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Ingredients:

  • 8 ounces penne pasta
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 red bell pepper, diced
  • 1/2 pound portobello mushrooms, diced
  • 1 pound medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1 (16 ounce) jar Alfredo sauce
  • 1/2 cup grated Romano cheese
  • 1/2 cup cream
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or more to taste
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley

Cooking Directions:

  1. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add pasta and cook for 8 to 10 minutes or until al dente; drain.
  2. Meanwhile, melt butter together with the olive oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Stir in onion, and cook until softened and translucent, about 2 minutes. Stir in garlic, red pepper, and mushroom; cook over medium-high heat until soft, about 2 minutes more.
  3. Stir in the shrimp, and cook until firm and pink, then pour in Alfredo sauce, Romano cheese, and cream; bring to a simmer stirring constantly until thickened, about 5 minutes. Season with cayenne, salt, and pepper to taste. Stir drained pasta into the sauce, and serve sprinkled with chopped parsley.

Cherry Pie Ice Cream

Friday, October 31st, 2008

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Ingredients:

  • 1 cup milk
  • 3 cups heavy cream
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 (16 ounce) jar maraschino cherries, drained and chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups cinnamon graham crackers, broken into 1-inch pieces

Cooking Directions:

  1. Heat cream and milk to just below the boil.
  2. Whisk egg yolks, sugar, and a pinch of salt until just blended.
  3. Strain hot cream onto egg yolk mixture, whisking constantly.
  4. Return to saucepan and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until it coats the spoon.
  5. Strain; add almond extract and cherries.
  6. Cool completely in refrigerator; freeze in ice cream machine according to manufacturer’s directions.
  7. Fold in graham crackers.
  8. Freeze until firm.

Toffee Crunch Ice Cream

Friday, October 31st, 2008

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Ingredients:

  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • Dash salt
  • 1 cup milk
  • 3 ounces German sweet chocolate, melted and cooled
  • 2/3 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons strong brewed coffee
  • 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 (1.4 ounce) bars Heath candy bars, crushed
  • 1/3 cup chopped pecans

Cooking Directions:

  1. In a saucepan, combine the egg, sugar and salt. Gradually add milk. Cook and stir over medium heat until mixture reaches 160 degrees F and coats the back of a metal spoon. Remove from the heat. Whisk in chocolate, then add cream, coffee and vanilla. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours.
  2. Fold in candy and nuts. Fill cylinder of ice cream freezer; freeze according to manufacturer’s directions. Allow to ripen in ice cream freezer or firm up in the freezer for 2-4 hours before serving.

Pesto Cream Sauce

Friday, October 31st, 2008

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Ingredients:

  • 1 (16 ounce) package linguine pasta
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 8 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 pinch pepper
  • 1 1/2 cups grated Romano cheese
  • 1 cup prepared basil pesto
  • 1 pound cooked shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 20 mushrooms, chopped
  • 3 roma (plum) tomato, diced

Cooking Directions:

  1. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add pasta and cook for 8 to 10 minutes or until al dente; drain.
  2. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Saute onion until tender and translucent. Stir in garlic and butter, and saute until garlic is soft and fragrant, about 1 minute. Dissolve flour in milk, then stir in. Season with salt and pepper, and simmer 4 minutes, stirring constantly. Add cheese, and stir until melted. Stir in pesto. Add shrimp, mushrooms and tomatoes. Cook 4 minutes, or until heated through. Toss with pasta until evenly coated.

Pork Roast with a Walnut-Parmesan Crust

Friday, October 31st, 2008

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Ingredients:

  1. 3/4 cup walnut halves
  2. 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  3. 1 medium onion, minced
  4. 1/4 cup toasted fine bread crumbs
  5. 2 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
  6. 2 teaspoons finely chopped sage
  7. 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  8. Salt and freshly ground pepper
  9. 3 pounds boneless pork shoulder roast, butterflied
  10. 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  11. Water
  12. 1/4 cup dry red wine
  13. 1/2 cup chicken stock or low-sodium broth
  14. 1 teaspoon all-purpose flour

Cooking Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Spread the walnuts in a pie plate and toast for about 10 minutes, or until golden. Let cool, then coarsely grind the nuts. Leave the oven on.
  2. Melt the butter in a medium skillet. Add the onion and cook over moderately high heat until softened and lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add the ground walnuts, bread crumbs, parsley and sage and let cool. Stir in the Parmesan and season with salt and pepper.
  3. Spread the pork roast open and season with salt and pepper. Spread half of the walnut mixture on the pork, then roll up the roast and tie it at 1-inch intervals with cotton string.
  4. In a sturdy roasting pan, heat the olive oil until shimmering. Season the roast with salt and pepper and cook over moderately high heat until browned all over, 10 to 12 minutes. Add 1/2 cup of water to the pan. Roast the pork for about 2 hours, basting occasionally and adding 1/4 cup of water to the pan each time you baste. The meat is done when an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the roast registers 160 degrees F. Transfer the pork to a baking sheet and let stand for 10 minutes. Pour any pan juices into a measuring cup and skim off the fat.
  5. Preheat the broiler. Discard the strings from the pork roast. Press the remaining ground walnut mixture onto the pork roast and broil 10 inches from the heat for about 5 minutes, or until the nut crust is golden and crisp. Let the pork stand while you make the sauce.
  6. Set the roasting pan over high heat. Add the red wine and boil until reduced by half, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Add the chicken stock and any reserved pan juices and boil until reduced by one-third. Whisk the flour into 2 tablespoons of water, then whisk the slurry into the sauce in the roasting pan and bring to a boil. Cook until the sauce is slightly thickened and no floury taste remains. Strain the sauce into a gravy boat and season with salt and pepper.
  7. Carve the pork into thick slices and serve with the sauce.

Yield: 7 servings

Rosemary Pork Roast

Friday, October 31st, 2008

 

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Ingredients:

  1. 3 1/2 pounds boneless pork loin roast
  2. 1/2 cup chopped green onions
  3. 2 1/4 cups chicken broth, divided
  4. 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  5. 2 tablespoons olive oil
  6. 4 garlic cloves, minced
  7. 1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary
  8. 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  9. 1 teaspoon salt (optional)
  10. 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  11. 1/4 cup cold water

Cooking Directions:

  1. Place roast in a large resealable plastic bag or glass container. Combine onions, 1/4 cup broth, vinegar, oil, garlic, rosemary and pepper; pour over roast. Cover and refrigerate for 4-8 hours, turning occasionally. Remove roast and place with fat side up in an ungreased shallow roasting pan.
  2. Combine marinade with remaining broth; pour over roast. Sprinkle with salt if desired. Bake, uncovered, at 350 degrees F for 2 to 2-1/2 hours or until a meat thermometer reads 160 degrees F-170 degrees F. Remove roast to a warm serving platter; let stand for 10 minutes before slicing.
  3. Meanwhile, skim fat from pan juices. Combine cornstarch and water until smooth; stir into juices. Bring to a boil over medium heat; boil and stir for 2 minutes. Serve with the roast.

Yield: 8 servings

Welcome to the Boomeryearbook Newsfeed #2

Tuesday, October 28th, 2008

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by Anne Marie

In the aftermath of the WWII, as manufacturing returned to production of consumer goods, populations redistributed themselves and the world of suburbia was born. Cookie cutter homes popped up in planned ‘estates’ all over the outlying areas of large cities and small, and Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Jones became neighbours. Being house proud, in order to stand out from the people next door, became the order of the day. Housewives became instant gardeners and husbands became obsessed with THE perfect lawn. Saturday mornings saw couples emerging from their homes in checkered dresses, shirts and dungarees for the onslaught on their little patches of unsuspecting nature. Beds, hedges, trees and grass were planted, nurtured, sowed and mowed into snap shot perfection. Flower shows and community competition became part of the fabric of suburban life. And Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Jones remained polite but obsessively jealous of their little slices of paradise. Trees began bearing fruit, vegetable gardens began yielding larger tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce and the like, than the local supermarket, and Mrs. Smith began to cast a covetous eye over the property line onto Mrs. Jones’s pumpkins. The fall “harvest” show was coming up and Mrs. Smith was determined to win that Blue Ribbon for her pumpkin pie. Mrs. Jones’s boasting at each Ladies Meeting of the virtues of her pumpkins and the purity of her hand ground cinnamon, had finally driven Mrs. Smith to thoughts of larceny. She was convinced that the pilfering of a couple of Mrs. Jones’s pumpkins for this years pie competition, was actually a Christian act to teach Mrs. Jones some humility. Mrs. Smith became a little withdrawn over the weeks leading up to the entry date for the pie competition. She constantly skulked around her backyard, keeping an eye on Mrs. Jones pumpkins, trying to judge the perfect moment of ripeness to filch a few of those oh so perfect pie makes. Mrs. Jones, being the keen competitor that she was, took note herself of Mrs. Smith’s odd behaviour. The competition was only a few days away. Mrs. Smith had her plan in place, her black sweater and slacks layed out in the guest room, a small pocket light at the ready. The night in question was forecast to be balmy and fine and her excitement knew no bounds. At last, at last, she would show that bragging neighbour who was really the better pumpkin pie maker! But the best laid plans of mice and men and all that, and poor Mrs. Smith found herself spending the afternoon and the night in question at the hospital caring for a child suffering from a severe asthma attack. The next morning dawned bright and clear and Mrs. Smith went out into her backyard to take stock and make a new plan. Oh Horrors! What is this? A fence? A FENCE?!!!! Mrs. Smith was beside herself. All the way down her property line and Mrs. Jones’s was a four foot chain link fence, that wrapped itself around and up the other side of Mrs. Jones’s property! Inside this unsightly enclosure Mrs. Jones was calmly cutting her pumpkins from the patch. Catching sight of Mrs. Smith, she rose and came over to the fence. “I know it’s ugly, she said, but we are getting a dog, and needed to put up something quickly to keep it confined. Next spring we will put up a wooden fence.” Poor Mrs. Smith could only nod and cast her eyes depressingly over her own meager, underdeveloped pumpkins as visions of Blue Ribbons danced out of her head. Of course, Mrs. Jones took first prize AGAIN that year at the pie competition, and to Mrs. Smith’s chagrin, the Jones’s never did get a dog. The following year, competition being what it is, Mrs. Smith tore out her pumpkin patch and planted strawberries. She took first place every year for the next six years in the Jam making competition. BUT. Her lovely wooden fence went up the FIRST year after planting. Take THAT Mrs. Jones!

Now to site business - Please, please everyone, click your little hearts out on the Boomer Games Navigation tab. In this age of depressing headlines and increasing stress, the need to keep our brains active and alert, without early drug usage, is imperative. The game links on this tab are invaluable. And don’t get discouraged if they seem too hard at first. The sense of satisfaction you will get when you finally ’solve’ one is immeasurable and worth the effort. So here’s your challenge for the week - How many puzzles can you solve in 7 days without losing your mind, and which ones did you beat? Inquiring minds want to know - can’t wait to read your comments.

Welcome to the Boomeryearbook Newsfeed #1

Tuesday, October 28th, 2008

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by Anne Marie

Once a week I’ll be popping up in your newsfeed in an attempt to make you laugh, make you think, bring back memories, and if we are all very lucky, learn something new about ourselves and the world we have grown up in, and into. Socially, the years since 1945 have been a roller coaster journey, and most of us have seen more changes in the last 63 years than past ages in history. Our journey here together in this blog, and as members of Boomeryearbook, should be fun don’t you think? We all have enough stress and strain in our lives - having kids does that to you for some odd reason. Being a kid does it too, and I think we can all relate to the days of our youth as baby boomers, and in spite of our education and hard earned middle aged wisdom, we still can’t get our kids to relate. Take heart - they will, though they’ll probably be middle aged themselves before they really ‘get’ it! Here’s a thought - make them read this blog! LOL

I’m 56. That means I was born in 1952 when the world was still recovering from WWII and immigrants were still flowing out of Europe and Britain in search of a better life in the land of milk and honey. Frankly, until Carnation Instant Milk made the Canada Food Guide, I don’t remember a lot of milk and honey when I was a small kiddie. I remember being called ‘Shanty Irish’, confined to the mean streets of the inner city among a babel of foreign languages and customs. Being Irish Catholic among the Italians was one thing. Being Irish Catholic among the Orange Irish ( Northern Protestant) was quite another. The death of my mother and the breaking up of my family changed all that, and by virtue of adoption I entered the more upscale world of a new social group called the middle class. And so began my indoctrination into the mind set of “keeping up with the Jones”. But that is the subject of future blogs, so you’ll just have to remain a member, read your newsletters and prepare to have some fun!
Next week: Mrs. Jones meets Mrs. Smith and the property line got fenced…………………………

Fun’s over, now for the good stuff, lol

Also in this blog will be included drawing your attention to particular links on site that you HAVE to check out or you’ll be missing a treat. This week I want to draw your attention to “What’s Cookin” with Peggy. Every week she posts a new recipe guaranteed to get your kitchen out of the doldrums and set your taste buds a dancing. This weeks special is “Delicious Crumb Cake (Quick and Easy) and it can be accessed from the Navigation Bar, Forum Icon, in the drop down menu.

I’ll be serving coffee at 4:00pm, two days from now. Who’s bringing the Crumb Cake?

Hole In One Insurance

Tuesday, October 28th, 2008

Hole In One Insurance

Undeniably, everyone loves gourmet food and high-stakes contest. Some elite country clubs can meet the expense of these things but most golf courses can’t, which is why hole-in-one insurance has increased in popularity among golf tournament organizers.

This works similarly to health insurance. The customers in exchange of remuneration pay set fees in case inflated expenses from confinement or medical operations must be paid. The thing is patients pay health premiums in the event that they need expensive medical assistance while golf courses buy insurance just in case someone makes a million-dollar hole in one.

Hole in One Insurance makes it possible for people and organizations with tight finances to offer outstanding prizes to the players.

Costs of Hole-in-One Insurance

Hole-in-one insurers base their rates on the laws of probability. This proves that companies will always make money and earn profits in the long run regardless of whether or not someone at a particular tournament wins a large prize. But if in the event that a player legitimately won a $1 million in a hole-in-one contest, the tendency is for the insurer to offer less favorable odds.

Paying Insurance to Make Money

In order for these events to make sufficient profit, money must be willingly spent on golf outings. One idea that makes golf tournaments interesting and exciting is by purchasing prize insurance. It allows golf courses to charge more per player making it very easy to turn an investment into profit

Do you want to learn more about golf and golf tournament fundraising? Find out from the boomer experts inour Golf Tidbits Forum.

 

Boomeryearbook.com is a social networking site connecting the Baby Boomer generation. Share your thoughts, rediscover old friends, or expand your mind with brain games provided by clinical psychologist Dr. Karen Turner. Join today to discover the many ways we are helping Boomers connect for fun and profit.

 

 

CONVERSATIONS IN NEW YORK(#4)

Tuesday, October 28th, 2008

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Susan Gordis

 

 

 

I’ve already said that Native New Yorkers are truly unusual people. That’s demonstrated in numerous and varying ways, among them the fact that we are so accustomed to being crushed together that we retool those situations into opportunities for inclusion in each other’s activities and for making a connection with other human beings.

 

Since I really like to talk with people, and as the multitude of people talking (loudly and ceaselessly) on their cell phones on the buses has increased, I sometimes have difficulty concentrating on reading as I’m making my way around Manhattan by bus. As a result I frequently take my knitting with me, and that leads me into conversations about knitting. Much like a visit to the veterinarian leads to talk of animals, working on a handcraft leads to discussions about handcraft.

 

One of the things my fellow knitters (or crocheters) want to know is where the yarn I have came from. As yarn shopping is an activity unto itself, much like fabric shopping for quilters or pigment shopping for painters, I end up learning a lot about where other people shop, and I share what I have learned about where beautiful yarns can be procured. One woman who was smiling at me across the bus aisle while I was working on a scarf finally was unable to contain herself any longer. She had to bob and weave in order to catch my eye, as there was a nervous teenager holding onto the pole near to the inquiring woman, first balancing on her right foot, then on the left, then shifting the position of her feet slightly, and generally just being an obstacle to interchange. But the knitter across the way was determined. “Where did you get that wonderful yarn?” As I told her how I came to have that yarn between my fingers another woman, four seats away from the other, burst in, “Oh, I saw yarn like that which I really liked but it was too expensive. Would you mind telling me how much you paid?” I told her. “Ooooooh, you’re a very good shopper. Is it cotton?” “Yes, it is,” I told her, “I don’t prefer to work in artificial fibers.” “May I see it?” she asked. By then the previously antsy teenager had become involved in our cross talk, and she volunteered to pass the yarn across the aisle from me to the other woman. After that lady had petted it and cooed over it, she wanted to pass it to the lady with whom I had originally been talking. That required that the three people in between take it and pass it, which they did. These complete strangers had all become part of our yarn discussion.

 

Recently I was in the subway (where cell phones are not operative, thankfully) with another scarf. A woman boarded the train at the next stop and sat down next to me. “Oh, I just love what you’re working on.” “Thank you, it will be a gift for the winter holidays. Do you knit?” “Yes, I do. Where do you buy your yarn?” Had we had that conversation in depth I certainly would have missed my destination by a number of miles, but when I stood up to be ready to get out another woman swooped into the seat I had vacated, and I was able to hear the beginning of the continuing conversation they were now having about yarn and knitting.

 

I was heading back home with the same scarf project and I was at a bus stop where three different buses pick up passengers. I was standing and knitting. An elderly woman said, “I love to see that you are knitting. I wasn’t sure anyone actually does that anymore.” I said, “There are more of us than you might think. Do you knit?” Indeed she is a veteran knitter, and she asked me where I had purchased my yarn. I knew she would be disappointed when I told her that I had bought it online, but when I started to tell her about my favorite local shops she told me that she lives in Queens so it was unlikely that she would get to visit the stores I was mentioning. Her bus came and she went off with a smile. Another woman stepped right up to pick up the thread (no pun intended) of the conversation that had just ended. She asked me to continue with my recommendations for local yarn shopping, so I listed my favorites and what I thought were good values at each of those locations. She sheepishly (ooops - another pun!) told me that she didn’t have a computer so she was limited to shopping “retail,” but she was very grateful for the information. Then my bus came, and I wished her good yarn hunting and boarded the bus.

 

I settled myself in a seat and resumed my knitting. A woman was sitting across the aisle from me, and when I happened to look up in her direction she smiled and said, “I love what you’re working on. It must be so nice that you know how to do that.” I said, “Do you want to learn?” She seemed surprised, but I waved her over and she sat down next to me. I told her I was going to demonstrate two basic things, knitting and purling, and once she learned them everything else would fall into place. She seemed skeptical, but curious. A man sitting perpendicular to the two of us leaned in; he wanted to learn, too. So I held an impromptu knitting class on the #7 bus, which included a woman a couple of seats away who said she knew how to knit, but she was part of it anyway.

 

Another woman who had boarded the bus and taken the seat which my first student had vacated was nodding when I said (again) that knitting is easy. She said she is an accomplished knitter and was glad to see that people were still doing it, teaching it and learning it. When my primary student was getting ready to get off the bus I told her about my favorite new yarn store, and she repeated all the information back to me to show me she was listening. (Students of all ages want to demonstrate to the teacher that they were indeed listening.) When it was my turn to get off the man who had also taken his first knitting lesson said to me, “Thank you so much!” I responded, “Thank you for talking. It’s so nice when the men talk, too, since we women do so much of it.”

 

On a bus I was sitting across the aisle from an older couple. I was working on the bottom of a rather small sweater that’s intended for a two-year-old. The woman asked me what it was I was making. I showed her the little bit that was already completed and she began to chat with me about the use of circular needles, knitting in the round, and her preferences for her knitting projects. We agreed that it’s interesting to use other people’s patterns as reference, but we prefer to make up our own designs. She told me that she had done a lot of knitting in years past but then had not found the time. Her twenty-four-year-old daughter, though, has recently become an avid knitter so that has served as inspiration for her and she was knitting again. The lady told me that now that they were retired (indicating herself and her husband) not only was she knitting again but her husband thought it would help him to keep his fingers nimble and she was teaching him to knit.

 

Children tend to ask me, “What are you doing?” I make sure to tell them that I’m knitting, I’m making a sweater (or scarf or baby blanket) the old-fashioned way, by hand. One little girl asked me right then and there to teach her how. I showed her the most basic concepts while we traveled, and then her aunt promised that she would finish the lesson, as she knows how to knit, too. One five-year-old boy said, “Why don’t you just buy a scarf?” and I explained to him that I find it relaxing to knit, and I like handmade things. He considered that carefully and then said proudly, “That’s why I paint pictures.” Smart little fellow; I feel sure he’s destined to be a successful artist.

 

Once a white-haired gentleman told me about how he learned to knit during World War II, when he was too old for military conscription and already had a family but was trying to find a way to do something for “the war effort.” He knitted things for American soldiers, as many people were doing, and he so loved the activity that he knits to this day, although his hands are slower than they used to be, according to him. During that same trip, although the first gentleman had gotten off the bus, another man engaged me in conversation about the crocheted items he has made, and seemed sorry that he didn’t have his current project with him to show to me, an intricate lace tablecloth for his daughter’s engagement, complete with their names.

 

I continue to be pleased and warmed by the information I learn from and share with my neighbors in New York City. We are a hearty group, able to withstand blackouts and garbage strikes, onslaughts of United Nations representatives and even the 11th of September. Except for crises of this nature, where we show our mettle even more brilliantly, we mostly go about our individual lives secure in the knowledge that we are surrounded by friends in the persons of other New Yorkers, and we share our experiences and our feelings and our lives.

 

 

 

© 2007 Susan Gordis